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  #1  
Old 03-13-2014, 01:47 AM
Sugarfoot Sugarfoot is offline
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Default No where to go

Is it just me or is everyone feeling the discomfort of overcrowding? I'm a Texas gal & it just seems like they keep slapping up more fast food joints & subdivisions everyday. there may be all kinds of shortages but no shortage of people piling in. I work in an industry that has a thumb on the pulse of development & friends it is making my head spin. I have looked in surrounding states for a more remote spot & just having a hard time finding any places that suitable that are not going through the same thing. I am seeing more and more single people and couples with no children buying 3000+ sqft homes. More folks moving to the country breeding really poor quality stock they leave in putrid conditions yet wouldn't think of slaughtering & eating them but shell out money day in and day out at the market for hot dogs made from God knows what. I used to be able to see the stars at night now all i see is a endless string of neighbors security lights that are so blinding i can't see anything else. Please don't be offended if you use one i know they help a lot of folks but for the love of Pete why move to the country if they are terrified to be there. I know states go through shifts & growth spurts etc but they keep coming from all directions & i am really surprised at the number coming from over seas. everywhere i go development is there. I would really dig a good ghost town or just no town. I don't think people are having to many kids i think we are taking on too many people as a country. Do they think you can keep loading people on the life raft and it never sink. Ok got that off my chest. Hope everyone is having a great month so far.
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Old 03-13-2014, 01:59 AM
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Naw , It's not just you, the media still pushes the " If your successful then you deserve" Yada Yada. They will find out soon enough they have been duped by a false economy
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:08 AM
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I can agree with everything you've said Sugarfoot.

I live in a very remote area (to most people's standards) and am surrounded by 200,000 acres of State Forest Land. One of my main goals when I bought my property is to not have any neighbors with no possibility of there being any in the future. That was a tough task since my property is only 5 acres.

When we first bought this house some 20 years ago it really strapped us financially. One thing that I didn't realize is that there was a one acre parcel that was between me and the next neighboring house up the road. We were only here one year and that parcel went up for sale. Oh man - if someone would buy that little piece and build something, I would be able to see it from my house.

We really scrambled, but we were able to buy it - thank goodness!

There is no industry or jobs at all in my area, so we don't have that influx of people wanting to move to this area. I have only one problem with a neighboring house on the other side of me - I can't see it from my house, but there is a problem. I'll be starting a thread of my own to hopefully gain some ideas on how to deal with it.
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:54 AM
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i hate it. i bought my land in wyoming where there are few people and i thought there would not be any job booms are people moving in. but they are, on the road where i seldom see more than one or two cars in 50 miles, i see twenty of more now in the evening, sometimes all of them have out of state plates.

not going to have many neighbores however, i got my land right on the border of blm land.

lot of easteners who destroyed their own state with their governemnt to to point they cannot even live there themselves now come out to the western states, and complain how there aint nothing but wind and sage brush.

a while back at the local gun show some dope came in off the bus and told us how he nowes everything, except for one thing he dont nowe, he told us, he dont nowe how we can live out here where there aint no hunting or fishing.

no hunting or fishing out here in wyoming ?

there is an article here on the bwhm by claire wolf, its tittled 'gulching'. i read it a lot.
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Old 03-13-2014, 07:34 AM
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Sugarfoot, I suspect that the economy is a bit better where you live, and so people are moving in because they have found work.

And, everybody who moves in will want an apartment, food, clothing, etc and so this ALSO increases the number of jobs in your area and so yet MORE people move ! I saw this in Kansas City during the recession of the 1980's and it led to a great deal of growth! (I cannot complain as I that was when I moved from Iowa to the Kansas City Kansas area: I was one of the people here for the work).

And, when I was growing up in California I saw this there as well.

What worked for us, eventually, was to move to one of the smaller cities that surround the metro area, and we moved to the OUTSKIRTS of that city. That way we were close enough in to commute to our jobs.

There are other solutions: I am certain that others will chime in. It is the middle of the night here and I am up with insomnia, so I might think of more to say later!
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Old 03-13-2014, 11:22 AM
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Texas economy is stronger than many areas--hence the influx of folks wanting to feed their families.

We have lots of land----but now having to deal with the water authorities,Forestry and all the EPA regs being installed its expensive.
Thats good and bad.

I had found a small lot I liked--called about it and was astounded at the price tag.
But in away thats good.

Back in the late 70's/early 80's the oil boom went bust and we had 1000's of folks that moved here living in cars.

Its not always greener on the other side of the state lines.

There's some reasonable land available but the new sewer system laws makes it a pricey adventure.
Power companies give you the first 100 ft. on power lines--then its up to you.
But I think thats every where.

Good luck with your quest.
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:53 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Default zoing dictates size of lots and homes

Over the years town zoning has restricted the size of homes that can be built. IMO this is one reason we see all those 2,000 to 4,000 sqft homes. It keeps the tax base up. A 3 to $400,000.00 home brings in a lot more $$$ than a 1,200 sqft one @ $100k
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:23 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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Hi Sugarfoot

Know where you are coming from--early 70's I lived in Austin (home of the Armadillo), but when I realized I needed to start locking the house when I was out, it was time to get away. Next year and a half, I lived in a tent out on the far NW part of Lake Travis, and then settled in a little Williamson county town--wasn't even incorporated then.

Got to watch the stop lights accumulate along 183, and 620 until nowhere was just another Austin bedroom, incorporated, political bullshit, and a police force of 7 who earned their keep by writing tickets--time to get away again.

Spent a long time looking, and finally a realtor I hooked up with through Lands of Texas website showed me THE PLACE. Knew it as soon as I saw it. Smaller acreage than I would have liked, but well wooded at the end of a private road 1/2 mile from blacktop (a FM road), with big ranches on three sides. Most important, it is well away from the I-35 corridor, and not likely to see much development during the time I have remaining.

Guess what I'm saying, is your dream is out there, just have to do a lot of serious looking, and of course be able to trim back the "wants list" so I falls more in line with the "needs" List. The little 2 room cabin suits me just fine--not so much for the lady friend though.

JVC
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Old 03-13-2014, 05:21 PM
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Sugarfoot,
There are 7,219,303,829 people in the world (as of a few seconds ago - it's changing constantly and the number doesn't go DOWN, as far as I can tell!)

http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/

Poor old earth is really infested with a bad case of people. I've been away from my place in Arkansas (20 acres, no neighbors within a half mile or so last time I checked) - but I'm longing to retire there. I've been gone almost 20 years, so I'm sure the folks that moved into the area since I left won't be tickled when I come back! When I first moved there, I had the attitude of: "I'm here now, the rest of you can just stay OUT!" (I've heard that's the Oregon unofficial state motto!)

My point is, there are still lots and lots of places that are sparsely populated - but be aware that if/when you find one, the people who are already there might be that way too. I've learned to like where I am, wherever I am - because tomorrow may never come. If/when it does, I'll be ready for it!
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  #10  
Old 03-13-2014, 05:33 PM
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That's a great story jvcstone!

For myself, I am so close to my present home and property to be my ultimate place. I was forced into early retirement a little while ago and had always said that this home is where I want to retire to anyway.

Winters here are wearing on me - especially coming off from one of our worst ones in 20 years. I also wish for more land - only have 6 acres here but it is all river front and I can't see any neighbors. I don't know what I would do with more land anyway.

Moving south is appealing to me - maybe western NC or eastern TN mountains, but the thought of moving and the work involved just turns me off. And....the grass isn't always greener on the other side.......

So I don't have to worry about any influx of strangers or city folk where I live. I only get a little noise from a couple camps across the river on summer weekends - 4-wheelers and kids screaming from time to time.
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  #11  
Old 03-14-2014, 12:25 AM
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This sounds so very familiar. In the last week of August, 2001, I took a vacation in the NE corner of South Dakota at the urging of my friend who had an "unused" cabin there. In the first week I stayed pretty much at the cabin but during the first week of Sept 2001, I ventured into town which was about 14 miles away. Within two to three trips to that town, I had it figured out. This was a place I could live. I based that decision on the PEOPLE there, NOT the geography. I say that because you don't have to live with the rocks and streams, (which while nice to have are not always your friend) you live with the people.

One day while I was asking a fellow a question, his answer solidified my future. I asked him, "how come folks don't lock their cars or their doors here?" His answer was right off the tip of the tongue...he didn't even think about it and said, "Well what if your neighbor needs to use your phone?" That did it. I was now convinced. If folks in this town had the generosity to leave their homes open to their neighbors and the neighbors had the courtesy NOT to abuse that privilege, I figured I could live with people like that. I went to a realtor in town who showed me three houses, one of which was a block from the local hospital, (i.e. work for me) and I bought that little, two bedroom 1 1/4 bath house at the east end of town...not the fancy side.

I flew home on the 8th of September that year and went back to the Navy where I was "gainfully employed" and found out 3 days later that I had made the smartest decision of my life. I didn't get to retire until March of 2007 but in late 2006, I found a farm that was MUCH to my liking there. I had been working on my house each year when I went on leave until that time. SCORE!!!!

Within a few weeks of that find, I bought that farm and moved there on the 29th of DEC 2006. I had been raped by the Wall Street Banksters so I scraped what money I had left and paid cash for the farm...a smart move to be certain.

Now, after 7 years of living here, I have to say that the most important part of finding the right place was becoming involved in a positive manner with the people in that town FIRST. Then when I asked one of them about a farm, the gal at the lumber yard knew that there were two of them on the market and I went to see them both the same day. The first one I saw was the one I bought, but the point here is that you don't always find what you want on the "distance purchase plan". You have to be somewhere a while to decide that you really want to be THERE.

Small towns and rural America is populated by folks who have been there for generations, for the most part. They don't warm up to "strangers" easily particularly if you are able to afford to buy what they have to sell. (Go figure)

You really need to be there for a while and decide if you can make some friends or do something that gives you a reason to want to stay before investing a lot of money in a place you may later decide you can't live in. In addition, if you are coming from a place like Texas where winter is NOT a big deal, be absolutely certain you spend a month or two during winter in your intended place before you commit your resources and find you don't "do winter". We had 4 months of sub-zero temperatures this year. Coldest winter on record. That may not be "your cup of tea" so you need to know that before you find out you "Don't Do Winter!" Moving large amounts of snow on a regular basis is a way of life from October to late April in a lot of places. Splitting wood by hand is a common past time, as well.

As I said, people in those places have been there for generations so they may have a place to live, but the economy may not be all that good for them and they are strapped for cash. They may be struggling to survive. They will see you can afford to buy, set up and live there so they may take a jaundiced eye toward you for NOT being broke!

Figure out what it will cost to live there for you. If you are going to have to work, remember that those folks may need a job as well and strangers coming to take their jobs may not sit quite right... And they really don't like folks who move there and immediately go on "General Assistance".

If you are able to afford the cost of living after moving into a new place, keep that to yourself. Don't let folks know you are able to afford things because they will charge you more than they do each other for the same thing, particularly tradesmen and services. Plus, you will be at the bottom of their priority list when their high school friends and 3d cousins need their work as well. If you live alone, don't advertise that. The women will immediately form a barrier around their men and the men will form a barrier around THEIR women. People will ask you questions of all sorts but they are gathering "INTEL" for their friends so be very careful what information you give them because tomorrow, they will all know it.

Additionally, be sure to do business "In Town". Get known by the local merchants as being someone who supports the local economy. DON'T drive 70 miles to the "big city" to do your shopping. They all know you are there. If you change the color of your fingernail polish, the whole town will know it by the following day and you'll also find out if they liked the other color better, too!

Whatever you do, be sure to find a way to be of service to that community in a short time after moving there. It will get you a long way to "getting along with folks" if you do. Go to church in town. If there isn't the kind you normally attend, try them all but pick one and go there. Wash dishes at the church dinners or cook "dish to pass" regularly.

One other piece of advice. Whatever you buy or have done, pay IN FULL, IMMEDIATELY. Don't carry a tab with anyone for anything. No one moves somewhere, sets up a homestead and lives all alone without interacting with the "locals".

Remember to them, YOU are the ones that you don't like where you are now because you are the one moving in to THEIR town! AND...you'll still be "the new folks" until your great grand-children have graduated from their high school!

I got more but I think you get the drift here.
Hope this helps you because I found all these things worked for me.
Cheers
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  #12  
Old 03-14-2014, 03:14 AM
sethwyo sethwyo is offline
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Someone needed to use my phone, they took it right off the seat of my car, never brought it back. cant figure who it was that would be out so far in the middle of the night, mabey a migrating mexican.
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2014, 11:36 AM
BIGGKIDD Male BIGGKIDD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icu4dzs View Post
This sounds so very familiar. In the last week of August, 2001, I took a vacation in the NE corner of South Dakota at the urging of my friend who had an "unused" cabin there. In the first week I stayed pretty much at the cabin but during the first week of Sept 2001, I ventured into town which was about 14 miles away. Within two to three trips to that town, I had it figured out. This was a place I could live. I based that decision on the PEOPLE there, NOT the geography. I say that because you don't have to live with the rocks and streams, (which while nice to have are not always your friend) you live with the people.

One day while I was asking a fellow a question, his answer solidified my future. I asked him, "how come folks don't lock their cars or their doors here?" His answer was right off the tip of the tongue...he didn't even think about it and said, "Well what if your neighbor needs to use your phone?" That did it. I was now convinced. If folks in this town had the generosity to leave their homes open to their neighbors and the neighbors had the courtesy NOT to abuse that privilege, I figured I could live with people like that. I went to a realtor in town who showed me three houses, one of which was a block from the local hospital, (i.e. work for me) and I bought that little, two bedroom 1 1/4 bath house at the east end of town...not the fancy side.

I flew home on the 8th of September that year and went back to the Navy where I was "gainfully employed" and found out 3 days later that I had made the smartest decision of my life. I didn't get to retire until March of 2007 but in late 2006, I found a farm that was MUCH to my liking there. I had been working on my house each year when I went on leave until that time. SCORE!!!!

Within a few weeks of that find, I bought that farm and moved there on the 29th of DEC 2006. I had been raped by the Wall Street Banksters so I scraped what money I had left and paid cash for the farm...a smart move to be certain.

Now, after 7 years of living here, I have to say that the most important part of finding the right place was becoming involved in a positive manner with the people in that town FIRST. Then when I asked one of them about a farm, the gal at the lumber yard knew that there were two of them on the market and I went to see them both the same day. The first one I saw was the one I bought, but the point here is that you don't always find what you want on the "distance purchase plan". You have to be somewhere a while to decide that you really want to be THERE.

Small towns and rural America is populated by folks who have been there for generations, for the most part. They don't warm up to "strangers" easily particularly if you are able to afford to buy what they have to sell. (Go figure)

You really need to be there for a while and decide if you can make some friends or do something that gives you a reason to want to stay before investing a lot of money in a place you may later decide you can't live in. In addition, if you are coming from a place like Texas where winter is NOT a big deal, be absolutely certain you spend a month or two during winter in your intended place before you commit your resources and find you don't "do winter". We had 4 months of sub-zero temperatures this year. Coldest winter on record. That may not be "your cup of tea" so you need to know that before you find out you "Don't Do Winter!" Moving large amounts of snow on a regular basis is a way of life from October to late April in a lot of places. Splitting wood by hand is a common past time, as well.

As I said, people in those places have been there for generations so they may have a place to live, but the economy may not be all that good for them and they are strapped for cash. They may be struggling to survive. They will see you can afford to buy, set up and live there so they may take a jaundiced eye toward you for NOT being broke!

Figure out what it will cost to live there for you. If you are going to have to work, remember that those folks may need a job as well and strangers coming to take their jobs may not sit quite right... And they really don't like folks who move there and immediately go on "General Assistance".

If you are able to afford the cost of living after moving into a new place, keep that to yourself. Don't let folks know you are able to afford things because they will charge you more than they do each other for the same thing, particularly tradesmen and services. Plus, you will be at the bottom of their priority list when their high school friends and 3d cousins need their work as well. If you live alone, don't advertise that. The women will immediately form a barrier around their men and the men will form a barrier around THEIR women. People will ask you questions of all sorts but they are gathering "INTEL" for their friends so be very careful what information you give them because tomorrow, they will all know it.

Additionally, be sure to do business "In Town". Get known by the local merchants as being someone who supports the local economy. DON'T drive 70 miles to the "big city" to do your shopping. They all know you are there. If you change the color of your fingernail polish, the whole town will know it by the following day and you'll also find out if they liked the other color better, too!

Whatever you do, be sure to find a way to be of service to that community in a short time after moving there. It will get you a long way to "getting along with folks" if you do. Go to church in town. If there isn't the kind you normally attend, try them all but pick one and go there. Wash dishes at the church dinners or cook "dish to pass" regularly.

One other piece of advice. Whatever you buy or have done, pay IN FULL, IMMEDIATELY. Don't carry a tab with anyone for anything. No one moves somewhere, sets up a homestead and lives all alone without interacting with the "locals".

Remember to them, YOU are the ones that you don't like where you are now because you are the one moving in to THEIR town! AND...you'll still be "the new folks" until your great grand-children have graduated from their high school!

I got more but I think you get the drift here.
Hope this helps you because I found all these things worked for me.
Cheers
Couldn't say it any better!
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2014, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Icu4dzs View Post
I got more but I think you get the drift here.
Hope this helps you because I found all these things worked for me.
Cheers
I feel your approach is a very good one and should work in most small towns in the US.

Myself - I am more of a recluse so I never wanted or needed to be socially accepted in the nearest small town. Over the past 25 years in this area, I found the local town to be just a gossip center.

Because of the remoteness of where I live, most everything is bought on-line. Grocery shopping is done every other week with a trip to a larger town where there is competition with much better prices and sales. In the nearest small town there is one grocery store, and boy do they know it! The know they can get their high prices since the only other alternative is spending the fuel money and time to venture to the next larger town. That kind of attitude really turns me off.

This small town has very little to offer - a couple gas stations, one mini-mart, one chain drug store, and that is about it. I tried spending my money in that town as much as I could, but even doing that we were not treated as we feel a customer should be treated. It's no wonder so many small businesses folded up over the past 10 years.
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Old 03-17-2014, 01:23 AM
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Originally Posted by blackpowderbill View Post
Over the years town zoning has restricted the size of homes that can be built. IMO this is one reason we see all those 2,000 to 4,000 sqft homes. It keeps the tax base up. A 3 to $400,000.00 home brings in a lot more $$$ than a 1,200 sqft one @ $100k

BlackpowderBill that is a good point, one I have not considered although I think it positively ruthless I can see how from the local goverments perspective this would be a good thing. To us live within your means working clods not so much. That certainly would explain why some cities reject building permits for new residential unless it is a minimum 1200 sqft single family or something along those lines.
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Old 03-17-2014, 11:38 PM
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You are just in the wrong part of Texas. The nearest town to us generally has a graduating class of about 14. No traffic lights. Just a gas station, feed store, and general store. We go 40 miles to get groceries once per week in a slightly bigger town. It is nice and quiet and "the stars at night are still big and bright".
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:02 AM
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You are just in the wrong part of Texas. The nearest town to us generally has a graduating class of about 14. No traffic lights. Just a gas station, feed store, and general store. We go 40 miles to get groceries once per week in a slightly bigger town. It is nice and quiet and "the stars at night are still big and bright".
"...Deep in the heart of Texas..."
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paradox View Post
You are just in the wrong part of Texas. The nearest town to us generally has a graduating class of about 14. No traffic lights. Just a gas station, feed store, and general store. We go 40 miles to get groceries once per week in a slightly bigger town. It is nice and quiet and "the stars at night are still big and bright".

Yep..we have 1 traffic light, 1 feed/hardware store, 1 grocery store, 3 gas stations, 3 restaurants, and a Dairy Queen. No police force. Volunteer fire and rescue squad. Everybody knows everybody else's business. Big news around here is a fresh litter of pups or a runaway donkey. No one complains about barking dogs or crowing roosters. Sometimes somebody will catch a monster catfish out of the creek and nail the head out on the fence post bordering the county road to show off.
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by StockdaleDave View Post
Yep..we have 1 traffic light, 1 feed/hardware store, 1 grocery store, 3 gas stations, 3 restaurants, and a Dairy Queen. No police force. Volunteer fire and rescue squad. Everybody knows everybody else's business. Big news around here is a fresh litter of pups or a runaway donkey. No one complains about barking dogs or crowing roosters. Sometimes somebody will catch a monster catfish out of the creek and nail the head out on the fence post bordering the county road to show off.
You have a DQ and 3 restaurants? That's like a mini metroplex! You can get egg rolls and crispitos at our gas station, does that count?
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:46 AM
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Most gas station food I've found requires a coroner to identify what it's supposed to be. We have 2 Mexican restaurants and 1 old school diner. The DQ deep fried jalapeno slivers are a favorite of mine. You can't go 3 miles in any direction from here and not find someone with a smoker selling BBQ on the weekends. We definitely don't go hungry round here.
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