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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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  #1  
Old 03-20-2014, 10:22 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Default What kind of tiller?

I am considering getting a tiller for my little JD 2305 diesel. Is a self-powered better than a PTO-powered? Any recommendations on brands? I am thinking of a 36" width so I can just straddle the beds/rows. Any and all thoughts are welcome.
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Old 03-21-2014, 12:23 AM
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I've been thinking about getting one for some years now - I have a JD 2520.

I've done some research, and found that the King Kutter brand sold around here by Tractor Supply is a very good one, and for a reasonable price. The smallest one they make is 4' which has a minimum HP rating of 20HP.

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...p?cm_vc=-10005

https://www.kingkutter.com/store-product.aspx?id=3554

But that won't work for between row cultivating.

Over the years I've owned a front tine tiller, a Troy Built rear tine, and a Mantis mini-tiller. Each has a purpose. Depending on how hard your ground is, I would avoid a front tine tiller. But, they are the least cost. The Troy Built rear tine was a fantastic machine. I owned that before I had a small enough tractor to do garden work. The little Mantis tiller was good only for a surface touch up between rows.

I always lean toward a tractor implement in lieu of a stand alone unit as I feel that the implement means one less engine to maintain. I've never had good luck with small engines that only get a little use and sit most of the year.

So if I were to get back to a serious garden, I would have a hard time choosing. The 3 point hitch tillers are quite expensive as are the Troy built rear tine. I would probably go with the Troy Built as it will work well for ground breaking and also for between row cultivating.
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Old 03-21-2014, 12:34 AM
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I want one with a man attached to it.:
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Old 03-21-2014, 01:40 AM
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I have several tillers. Each with a specific purpose as mentioned above.
I have the County Line (60") pictured above, and it worked very well on my NH TC29-D and now on my JD3520. For overall preparation of the soil, at the beginning and end of the season, there is NO repeat NO competition for it from an implement perspective. I don't know of any other brands but this thing has no (shall we say) NATURAL PREDATORS. It goes through solid soil with no problems. It will NOT go between rows unless of course the rows are more than 5 feet apart. I have used it for three seasons now and it really does a great job. Sitting on the tractor rather than walking behind either a front or rear tine tiller is by far and away superior. Takes much less time and no back pain either.

I have a Husqvarna 18" rear tine tiller which is fine between rows. You do have to keep up with things in order to get it between the rows but it has started for me every year I have owned it with little or no effort (not an electric start, either) Before I got the tiller for the tractor, I used it for the entire garden. My first garden here was 24 x 20. I moved it after three years to another place and enlarged it to 25 x 50. The tractor mounted tiller makes that prep a snap to do, although at the beginning of the season I do run a small field cultivator through the soil with the tractor first. It makes things go faster if the soil is broken down a few inches first. I haven't used a plow blade since I left Florida.

I had a little tiller like the mantis and it was great for going around things but it too is limited in scope to its particular use.

Of course some of the decision is based on your "labor force". If the labor force consists of "1" (i.e. you only ) then the tractor mount is the way to go! If you have 4 healthy children and they will work, well maybe you can get away with a more "primitive approach" but around my farm, it is just ME!

So, if you are limited in time and you really need to till a large space, get the tractor mounted version. You won't be sorry...
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Old 03-21-2014, 03:27 AM
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I couldn't run a tiller across this rock pile on a bet..... However....

From reading a bunch of stuff on the compact tractor forums, I believe the JD2305 is considered a "limited" category 1 3pt hitch....

With that in mind, it makes a difference what implements you use... In that it may have the pto horsepower, but may be limited to a xb physical size implement...

I suggest searching forums for info..
greentractortalk.com
mytractor.com
tractorbynet.com
There is a ton of info on 2305s there...

My older JD855 is considered a large frame compact, with a full size cat1 3pt hitch, but my total lifting weight limit and pto horsepower available are things that require consideration when I'm buying implements...

Several manufacturers make 42-48-54" tillers, that may be compatible..

Good luck
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Txanne View Post
I want one with a man attached to it.:

Rent one it's cheaper and less trouble than buying one, even a used man is expensive to keep.
Or so my wife tells me.
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:19 PM
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I can't see much advantage to using a tiller rather than a disc for most cultivation, and a disc is MUCH cheaper and less likely to break
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Old 03-24-2014, 03:59 PM
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Default brinley products

http://www.brinly.com/CC_56BH.html

anyone have any experience with these products for small tractor use.?
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Old 03-24-2014, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by silken View Post
http://www.brinly.com/CC_56BH.html

anyone have any experience with these products for small tractor use.?
Everything I ever had made by Brinly didn't last very long before something broke.

They are OK for LIGHT occasional use, but not for much real work

You can buy the parts for most of those implements and have someone build a heavy duty version for just a little more than you'll pay for their lightweight materials

Try looking here for good quality parts and implements:
http://www.agrisupply.com/
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Old 03-24-2014, 05:29 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Originally Posted by Icu4dzs View Post
I have several tillers.
Of course some of the decision is based on your "labor force". If the labor force consists of "1" (i.e. you only ) then the tractor mount is the way to go! If you have 4 healthy children and they will work, well maybe you can get away with a more "primitive approach" but around my farm, it is just ME!

So, if you are limited in time and you really need to till a large space, get the tractor mounted version. You won't be sorry...
I have only my wife and myself--one kid left at home, but he graduates from high school in 1 1/2 months, then will be off. I have several gardens: 30 x 120, 50 x 50 as well as 10 large beds. If the livestock go away, the gardens will get bigger. I'm getting too old to do all the labor manually.
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Old 03-29-2014, 05:37 PM
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Sooooooo Don......

What you have described is 5000 sq. ft. plus more area.... That is a significant amount of ground it seems....

Question.... Have you checked with your local JD dealer... ?? What size tiller do they suggest ?? Frontier brand I presume...

Have you got one yet... ??

Pictures... We need action pictures....

Good luck
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Old 03-29-2014, 06:18 PM
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I can relate to everything said regarding manuel versus mechanical labor as we age.

I found an older Troy-Built "Horse" tiller made before TB sold out. It is indeed a horse, and it does a great job of tilling even the rocky soil that was my vegetable garden. I also have a Honda mini-tiller, and I use it to get between the plants for cultivation and weed control.

Since last season I have relocated to a more secluded area with more acreage. But now I have a Kubota L3130. Driving that tractor is a lot easier (and more fun) than walking behind that 'Horse'. But I don't have a tiller for the Kubota! The cost put me off. Would I have need of it more than just the initial ground breaking in spring and clearing off in the fall? Maybe one of you could shed some light on that.
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Old 03-29-2014, 07:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post
I can relate to everything said regarding manuel versus mechanical labor as we age.

I found an older Troy-Built "Horse" tiller made before TB sold out. It is indeed a horse, and it does a great job of tilling even the rocky soil that was my vegetable garden. I also have a Honda mini-tiller, and I use it to get between the plants for cultivation and weed control.

Since last season I have relocated to a more secluded area with more acreage. But now I have a Kubota L3130. Driving that tractor is a lot easier (and more fun) than walking behind that 'Horse'. But I don't have a tiller for the Kubota! The cost put me off. Would I have need of it more than just the initial ground breaking in spring and clearing off in the fall? Maybe one of you could shed some light on that.
I always seem to look at implements for my tractor first before anything that is stand alone. I figure that I have the power unit already (Deere 2520). One thing I don't want at this stage is more engines to maintain and worry about if they are going to start after storage.

With tillers it is a tough one, mostly due to their cost. Since you already have one of the best made walk behind tillers, I would just use that. You can use if for ground breaking and cultivating. Those older Troy Built tillers are a dream to run. I had to test mine out once (many years ago) and you truly can run them with just a couple fingers on one handle.

I'm going through the same process now with a possible future generator purchase. Getting a PTO unit makes so much more sense since I already have the power unit, but they cost much more than a gas powered stand alone unit. But I always have a large supply of diesel (or fuel oil) here and don't want the hassle of storing gas and trying to keep it fresh.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:06 AM
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I'm going through the same process now with a possible future generator purchase. Getting a PTO unit makes so much more sense since I already have the power unit, but they cost much more than a gas powered stand alone unit. But I always have a large supply of diesel (or fuel oil) here and don't want the hassle of storing gas and trying to keep it fresh.
The biggest drawback to PTO powered generators is you usually have to run the tractor at such a high speed to get the proper RPM's that the smaller gas engines are much more fuel efficient
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:14 AM
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But I don't have a tiller for the Kubota!
Very few people I know with really large gardens or commercial farms use tillers much, if at all
They generally use assorted plows, disks and cultivators that fit the tractor.
You can pick that stuff up at farm auctions sometimes for what amounts to the scrap metal price
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Old 03-30-2014, 11:56 AM
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The biggest drawback to PTO powered generators is you usually have to run the tractor at such a high speed to get the proper RPM's that the smaller gas engines are much more fuel efficient
Yeah - my little 3 cylinder Yanmar would be running at just about full rpm the same as mowing where I use close to 1 GPH. But I have lots of diesel storage.

Another point that has been made was in an event that one would need a generator such as a bad weather event, the tractor would be tied to the generator when it will probably be needed for other chores such as tree/brush clearing etc.

After making my last post I did some more research. I found something that I didn't know existed - a small gas generator that runs on propane. Uses the 20# or 30# tanks. Since I have a few tanks around, and propane stores very well, I think this one would be the ticket for me.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...FbTm7AodJwcAaA

Sorry to run this thread off topic Don!
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Very few people I know with really large gardens or commercial farms use tillers much, if at all
They generally use assorted plows, disks and cultivators that fit the tractor.
You can pick that stuff up at farm auctions sometimes for what amounts to the scrap metal price
I've been watching craigslist all winter for a single bottom plow just for that reason. No luck so far. But I haven't decided how much garden I really want or think I'll need. My wife will help pick, but its really just me that works a garden. At some point you have to dismount the tractor and get your hands dirty. After this coming season I'll have a better sense about it if the Good Lord allows it. The tiller may be all I need.
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Old 03-30-2014, 03:16 PM
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I found something that I didn't know existed - a small gas generator that runs on propane.
Most all gas powered generators can be converted to propane with a few carb changes.

Kits are available, and once converted, you can switch back and forth from gas to propane

Gasoline gives more power, but propane burns cleaner

Many forklifts are set up that way so you can use gas outdoors for the efficieny, and propane indoors due to fewer toxic emmissions

http://propane-generators.com/
Quote:
Now that you have invested in a backup generator, make sure that it runs when you need it the most. Modify your Generator to run on propane or natural gas or even keep the gasoline option if you like and have the option to run all three fuels on the same engine!
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Old 03-30-2014, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Most all gas powered generators can be converted to propane with a few carb changes.

Kits are available, and once converted, you can switch back and forth from gas to propane

Gasoline gives more power, but propane burns cleaner

Many forklifts are set up that way so you can use gas outdoors for the efficieny, and propane indoors due to fewer toxic emmissions

http://propane-generators.com/
Given this information, wood gas can also be used, right?
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:53 PM
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Given this information, wood gas can also be used, right?
I suppose it would be possible, but I'm not sure how practical it would be in emergencies
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