BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum

Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser


Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Homesteading > Your Homestead

Your Homestead Tell and show others with words and pictures how you built or are building your homestead and how you keep things going day-to-day. One thread per member, please.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-15-2014, 03:10 AM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Talking The fun has begun

We have finally purchased land in East Tennessee. We were able to find exactly what we were looking for. Secluded, wooded, nice flat area for a house and garden and we even got a small creek. It also came with some unwelcome guest....Ticks. Hubby frecked when he found them on him, I thought he was over reacting a bit. Not so much when I had to pick them off him, me and the two dogs. We will be getting guineas once we are here permanently. On the upside this means we have wildlife, hoping for deer and turkey.
The guy will be out tomorrow to cut in the driveway if the weather is good. We will also find out if it is going to be to steep for my 2 wheel drive suv. He will also be bush hogging the flat area for us. Praying for good weather.
We will only be here for a few more days before we have to head back to Florida. Then back again in a month to get the septic and well installed and start on the house. Really don't want to leave but have to get everything buttoned up at home before the final move in August. Will post pics soon and maybe we will also have a name for our new place.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-15-2014, 03:41 AM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,443
Default

Exciting! I have a few friends in various parts of TN. They love it there.

Re: Ticks -- the only word I have is DEET.
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-15-2014, 03:50 AM
KarenBC's Avatar
KarenBC Female KarenBC is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Prince George, B.C., Canada
Posts: 1,393
Default

Please keep posting! Congrats on your new dream - it's an adventure!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-15-2014, 12:13 PM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Cleveland OH / Palestine WV
Posts: 1,330
Default

East Tenn is beautiful country. We got married in Gatlinburg.

Were originally looking there, but something about WV drew us there instead.

Re: the ticks. We had them a bunch at first. From what I've read, they hang out on plants waiting for a host to wander by.

In our experience, what has helped tremendously is to regularly cut the pasture - at least in the areas you plan on inhabiting.

I run a bush hog over large portions of the pasture, and then use a regular push mower on about 1/4 acre around our camp site. Really keeps the ticks down.

I also get some permethrin from Tractor Supply. You dilute it with a spray bottle and then can spray your clothes. I also spray the dog and her blankets. When really bad, I sprayed the ground around where we tend to spend the most time.

Just cutting the fields probably eliminated 90% of the tick problem for us.

I've also read you can take cotton and soak it in permethrin, then let it dry and put the cotton into toilet paper tubes. Distribute those around your property. The mice use the treated cotton for their nests and it kills the ticks on the mice. Apparently mice are a major food supply for the local tick population and this will hit them where it hurts. I haven't tried this yet as cutting the fields worked so well, but I may give it a shot.
__________________
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.

Marxism: The ultimate illusory fantasy.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-15-2014, 01:39 PM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Thanks for the advice regarding the ticks. I'm hoping today after a large area is bush hogged it will help. I read in another post that dawn dish soap on a cotton ball then pressed to your skin gets them off. I have just decided it is all part of this kind of life and you deal with it and move on to the next thing. Never sweat the small stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-15-2014, 10:27 PM
Gravedigger Female Gravedigger is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 13
Default

Am very much looking forward to the updates on your new land, such an exciting time! August seems far away now, but you'll be so busy getting ready to sell your current house, and packing, etc. that time will just fly by.

Congratulations!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-16-2014, 01:38 PM
TickFarmer TickFarmer is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Near Stockton Lake in MO
Posts: 258
Default

Welcome to the forum and the fascinating occupation of Raising Ticks! Unlike other livestock operations it is a seasonal occupation. Spring and early summer will be your busy time, but fall and winter leaves you with little to do to maintain your herd.
The other two advantages are that they are not noisy and they don’t have an objectionable odor. Wander by a cattle, goat or swine feed lot and those traits become immediately apparent.
Be sure to pin up your guineas and chickens and let the brush grow for a good crop of ticks. Also try to limit the winter field burnoffs or you will notice a serious decline in your free range herd.
I’m sure you will quickly join the American Tick Breeders Association and register the line you will be developing? Check for a State Chapter near you!
You will notice you have one of two main lines of Ixodes that are easily distinguished between. The Lone Star tick has a white spot on her back right behind the head part; the Deer tick (also known as eastern woods tick or simply the &!%* Tick!) has a dark spot.
When you develop a sufficient herd (and have joined the ATBA, I will be happy to share my list of buyer’s agents.

However, the experienced Tickboy (or girl, as the case may be), is careful not to transport the breeding stock haphazardly about the Tick Farm. One must maintain the purity of the breed!
Although we use the double system at the Buzzard’s Roost Tick Farm, the adoption of a “system” is an individual choice, based on the desired result.

DEET repellants work by evaporation, with the vapor confusing the tick (and other pests) so that they have trouble locating you. Once they find you however, you are fair game. We spray ourselves before heading to the TickYard.
Deet products are found just about everywhere. Just check the labels on the insect repellants you select. Higher concentrations are usually better.

PERMETHRIN is a contact poison. The EPA says it isn’t excessively dangerous to humans. (I’m from the Government and I’m here to help you?) I recommend you keep it off your skin, but that’s me. I’m not from the Government.
Permethrin comes in several formulations, and can be used in a couple ways. I like the “dip & soak” method for clothing. There is also a spray, but I always wonder what part I missed when I use that. One of the advantages of the dip & soak application is that it sticks to your clothes through a washing or three – much like poison ivy sap.
The cost of the stuff isn’t excessively high, but it is enough that we have Farm clothes & City clothes.
The brand we use is Sawyer Soak & Wear Military Style Treatment packs.

Good luck and no matter what else you do – Have Fun!
-The TickFarmer
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-16-2014, 02:55 PM
randallhilton's Avatar
randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Fort Worth TX
Posts: 1,443
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TickFarmer View Post
Welcome to the forum and the fascinating occupation of Raising Ticks! Unlike other livestock operations it is a seasonal occupation. Spring and early summer will be your busy time, but fall and winter leaves you with little to do to maintain your herd. . . .
That's golden! Thanks for a good start to my morning!
__________________

Use less, lose less, weigh the benefits, count the costs.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-20-2014, 01:35 AM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Well made it back home. We couldn't get the drive way graded or bush hogging done, the weather would not work with us. But the guy we hired is going to do it for us while we are gone. Can't wait to see the change. Got our permit for the septic. When we go back in about a month we will be installing it and the well. We were also able to find a shed builder, got plans for a 16x30 which will be transformed into our new home. It's kind of funny I have told a few friends our plan with the "shed" and I have gotten the strangest responses and they look at me like I have lost my mind.. well maybe I have a little. I guess you just have to think outside the box. It will definitely be a change going from over 2,000 sq ft to 480. This lifestyle change is more about living the simpler life and most of our living will be outside. Anyway here are a few pics of the property.

This is the area that will be the driveway.
[/URL][/IMG]

This is the area that will be cleared for our new home. This area of the property has been cleared once before. The previous owner decided they wanted to be closer to a town.
[/URL][/IMG]

Just a pic of the trees
[/URL][/IMG]
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-23-2014, 12:00 PM
Ciderman's Avatar
Ciderman Male Ciderman is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 578
Default

Oreo23 nice pictures. Makes me want to revisit the south.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-11-2014, 12:46 AM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Well we finally made it back to our property, it took a little longer than expected. When we arrived the area we wanted had been cleared and the driveway had gravel. It looked so pretty but it also held a secret. Under all that gravel was mud! Prior to our arrival it had rained. We had a very interesting time getting our 2 wheeled drive suv and truck up the incline. Dh says monemtum is key, not sure I am convinced. Being from Florida, steep driveways are not very common. If anyone has any suggestions to help this not so driver friendly driveway I am all ears. Didn't really know that when TN dirt/clay gets wet it is slicker than baby snot. Anyway that pretty driveway was short lived. Here is a few pics of it before and after.
http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...pspole07ua.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...psfuplozkb.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...pse64de3ec.jpg
And of course the day the work was to start on our shed "house" it rained again. The builder only made it about eight feet off the gravel and got stuck, even 4 wheel drive didn't help. Material deliveries had to be postponed... ugh. Thankful the rain didn't last and they were able to start the following day. Everything dried out including us, camping in the rain sucks, btw.
The ticks were not so bad this time but I learned the hard way about another bug... Chiggers. Now don't get me wrong we have them in Florida we call them red bug and I know what to stay away from to avoid them. I have itched for a week and anti itch cream is my best friend right now. Guess it is just one more of lifes lessons. Stay away from the Chigger bushes and if you don't buy stock in itch cream your going to need it.

Last edited by Oreo23; 07-11-2014 at 12:55 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-11-2014, 01:48 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Cleveland OH / Palestine WV
Posts: 1,330
Default

This is one of three steep inclines to get out of our property



This particular one has a near vertical 75' drop along the side.

Anyhow, we had a heckuva time getting out when wet. Getting in when wet was almost terrifying. At one point, I slid backwards and sideways down one of the inclines trying to go up and caught a small sapling, putting a nice big dent in the front fender and door of the truck.

And we have 4wd.

What made the difference for us is tire chains. PITA to put on and take off, but since we got those, I haven't slid a bit. I don't know if they'll be enough with 2wd, but they sure helped us.
__________________
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.

Marxism: The ultimate illusory fantasy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-11-2014, 11:57 AM
Txanne's Avatar
Txanne Female Txanne is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 14,233
Default

Now that is a problem to work on.
Using that area to go in and out of the property:Will you chose one and concrete it or
gravel it?

I had a drive like that and the continual washout changed constantly.
Is it possible to make a slanted approach?

You may have to put 4"" pipe around your vehicles! :
__________________
TROUBLE RIDES A FAST HORSE
CASUS BELLI
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-11-2014, 09:19 PM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Didn't have time to post pics of the house last night photobucket was giving me a hard time. So work was able to begin on the building. I was a little worried it wouldn't be enough space for us but after it was done I think it will work out well. Space will be limited and only the stuff we realy need will be allowed in. I recently came to the point of view that we spend way to much time and especially money on stuff we realy don't need and half the time it just gets stored somewhere to never be seen again. Well anyway enough about that. Here are some pics.
http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...psa3c305ef.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...psa2a80060.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...ps5ab654f5.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...ps3ab64f17.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...ps5df4b9d3.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...ps5a1ee4fa.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...ps8e94d9be.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...psaac20b4d.jpg

A few things weren't complete when I took the last few pics. The loft wasn't installed and all the outside trim still had to be installed. We will be finishing the inside ourselves. Plan is to get the bathroom installed first, cause god knows we will need a bath after working all day and I realy do not want to smell up the whole place, lol. Next will be to insalated the entire building. Winter will not be that far off and I have no intention of being cold. Flooring in the rest of the area next and then the kitchen. Just thinking it will be easier to install flooring without kitchen cabinets. As I said before we will be living a little rough to start with but it's do-able. Oh and if that wasn't enough to do we want to get our animals asap and start preparing the area for a garden in the spring. Dang we have a lot to do, sounds like fun to me! I will post pics as the process continues. Any advice or insight would be greatly appreciated.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-11-2014, 09:24 PM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisser View Post
This is one of three steep inclines to get out of our property



This particular one has a near vertical 75' drop along the side.

Anyhow, we had a heckuva time getting out when wet. Getting in when wet was almost terrifying. At one point, I slid backwards and sideways down one of the inclines trying to go up and caught a small sapling, putting a nice big dent in the front fender and door of the truck.

And we have 4wd.

What made the difference for us is tire chains. PITA to put on and take off, but since we got those, I haven't slid a bit. I don't know if they'll be enough with 2wd, but they sure helped us.
You are braver than I. I would be doing a lot of walking! I will be looking into chains. I am worried about winter, the getting out isn't so bad it's the getting in, that's a problem.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07-12-2014, 03:24 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 5,546
Default

So you have to get up and down this place. Grade it, make a ditch on the side, put gravel down, big stuff on the bottom, later smaller stuff on that. I can not remember the grade numbers. Direct run off into the ditch. Be thankful it is such a short span.
We have a spot not quite as bad, we have been filling it in with brush and stuff over the years,and it is grown over now. That is how I got one of my upside down Huegelbeet gardens, terraced a gulch.

things would be so nice if they were simple. Good luck with it.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07-12-2014, 03:31 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 5,546
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oreo23 View Post
Well we finally made it back to our property, it took a little longer than expected. When we arrived the area we wanted had been cleared and the driveway had gravel. It looked so pretty but it also held a secret. Under all that gravel was mud! Prior to our arrival it had rained. We had a very interesting time getting our 2 wheeled drive suv and truck up the incline. Dh says monemtum is key, not sure I am convinced. Being from Florida, steep driveways are not very common. If anyone has any suggestions to help this not so driver friendly driveway I am all ears. Didn't really know that when TN dirt/clay gets wet it is slicker than baby snot. Anyway that pretty driveway was short lived. Here is a few pics of it before and after.
http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...pspole07ua.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...psfuplozkb.jpg

http://i1054.photobucket.com/albums/...pse64de3ec.jpg
And of course the day the work was to start on our shed "house" it rained again. The builder only made it about eight feet off the gravel and got stuck, even 4 wheel drive didn't help. Material deliveries had to be postponed... ugh. Thankful the rain didn't last and they were able to start the following day. Everything dried out including us, camping in the rain sucks, btw.
The ticks were not so bad this time but I learned the hard way about another bug... Chiggers. Now don't get me wrong we have them in Florida we call them red bug and I know what to stay away from to avoid them. I have itched for a week and anti itch cream is my best friend right now. Guess it is just one more of lifes lessons. Stay away from the Chigger bushes and if you don't buy stock in itch cream your going to need it.
It will swallow a lot of gravel. Be careful on that slippery mud, that is how I twisted and broke my ankle. Worse than ice. We sure could use that rain here.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-13-2014, 12:38 AM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
So you have to get up and down this place. Grade it, make a ditch on the side, put gravel down, big stuff on the bottom, later smaller stuff on that. I can not remember the grade numbers. Direct run off into the ditch. Be thankful it is such a short span.
We have a spot not quite as bad, we have been filling it in with brush and stuff over the years,and it is grown over now. That is how I got one of my upside down Huegelbeet gardens, terraced a gulch.

things would be so nice if they were simple. Good luck with it.
We wanted it cut down more but due to a large rock formation under it we couldn't. Apparently it runs from the ajoining property and into mine to just on the other side of the driveway. I guess it could have been done if my pockets were deep enough, but they are pretty shallow so we have to make the best of it and there was no other location to place the driveway. The gravel has already started sinking so we have placed larger rocks in the really bad spots and pushed the dirt and gravel over them. We are planning to do a ditch to direct the run off away and at some point more gravel when funds allow it, that stuff is a little pricey.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-13-2014, 12:45 AM
Oreo23's Avatar
Oreo23 Female Oreo23 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: TN
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bookwormom View Post
It will swallow a lot of gravel. Be careful on that slippery mud, that is how I twisted and broke my ankle. Worse than ice. We sure could use that rain here.
Thanks for the warning but I already found out the hard way . Thankful I only hurt my pride. I landed on the cushion god gave me
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-13-2014, 12:50 AM
chrisser Male chrisser is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Cleveland OH / Palestine WV
Posts: 1,330
Default

I don't have any direct experience, but I've heard that landscape fabric can make a huge difference under gravel in muddy soil situations. Keeps the gravel from sinking into the mud.
__________________
Government is not reason, it is not eloquence it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.

Marxism: The ultimate illusory fantasy.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -2. The time now is 05:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.