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  #21  
Old 07-25-2014, 01:50 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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I've seen our DNR lay down landscape fabric, then chain link over that, then gravel.

Just guessing, but the landscape fabric keeps the gravel from sinking (like Chrisser mentioned) and the chain helps protect the fabric from being torn up.

Alot of work there! I understand the feeling!
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  #22  
Old 07-25-2014, 01:44 PM
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I don't have any direct experience, but I've heard that landscape fabric can make a huge difference under gravel in muddy soil situations. Keeps the gravel from sinking into the mud.
That stuff works also---used here on sloped roadsides,ponds,all kinds of applications.

Caliche dirt is is slick miserable mud.
Balls up under fenders wells and can stop you in your tracks.
I have seen alot of folks using the shredded tires and gravel mixture.
tough stuff.
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  #23  
Old 07-25-2014, 02:14 PM
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That stuff is geotec fabric. Different than landscape stuff. It is used when the soil underneath is unstable and won't compact ( make ruts). We used it a lot on the last airport job It was used to stabilize what is called " pumping soil . That is soil that no matter how much you try it still ruts and moves up and down when driven across .It has to do with clay content of the soil. I think Home Depot sells it also , but that is not landscape fabric used on driveways-- unless the builder is less than honest.

http://www.usfabricsinc.com/geotexti...bricgeotextile
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 07-25-2014 at 02:21 PM.
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  #24  
Old 07-25-2014, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by MissouriFree View Post
That stuff is geotec fabric. Different than landscape stuff. It is used when the soil underneath is unstable and won't compact ( make ruts). We used it a lot on the last airport job It was used to stabilize what is called " pumping soil . That is soil that no matter how much you try it still ruts and moves up and down when driven across .It has to do with clay content of the soil. I think Home Depot sells it also , but that is not landscape fabric used on driveways-- unless the builder is less than honest.

http://www.usfabricsinc.com/geotexti...bricgeotextile
MoF
I think thats what I am thinking of---clay soil here also.
18 inches to 2 ft down.
Some places you will think your in quick sand.
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  #25  
Old 07-25-2014, 06:17 PM
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MoF
I think thats what I am thinking of---clay soil here also.
18 inches to 2 ft down.
Some places you will think your in quick sand.
Yeah we ran into patches of it on the job. Moisture in the soil has nothing to do with it either.
Here is an extreme example . See how when he digs it up it is dry.
We had places pretty close to this. Solution is dig it out or try geotec mate then aggregate .

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Rd6W2aP2dkA
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  #26  
Old 07-25-2014, 06:25 PM
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Yeah we ran into patches of it on the job. Moisture in the soil has nothing to do with it either.
Here is an extreme example . See how when he digs it up it is dry.
We had places pretty close to this. Solution is dig it out or try geotec mate then aggregate .

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Rd6W2aP2dkA
Wow thats scary--I'd be afraid to walk on it.
They have the same problem in the oil fields here.
They build huge timbered roads in its so bad.
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  #27  
Old 07-29-2014, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissouriFree View Post
That stuff is geotec fabric. Different than landscape stuff. It is used when the soil underneath is unstable and won't compact ( make ruts). We used it a lot on the last airport job It was used to stabilize what is called " pumping soil . That is soil that no matter how much you try it still ruts and moves up and down when driven across .It has to do with clay content of the soil. I think Home Depot sells it also , but that is not landscape fabric used on driveways-- unless the builder is less than honest.

http://www.usfabricsinc.com/geotexti...bricgeotextile
I have looked into this. It is a little on the pricey side. At some point we will probably make the investment, but for right now there are other things that are far higher on the list like water, septic, power, a bathroom and some sort of kitchen. Then there's the fact that winter will be right around the corner, so getting the house insulated and getting heat have also jumped up the list of must do first. We will make the best of it with what we have to work with. Can't wait to get back there to get started. We leave FL for good next week
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  #28  
Old 07-29-2014, 12:13 AM
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I have looked into this. It is a little on the pricey side. At some point we will probably make the investment, but for right now there are other things that are far higher on the list like water, septic, power, a bathroom and some sort of kitchen. Then there's the fact that winter will be right around the corner, so getting the house insulated and getting heat have also jumped up the list of must do first. We will make the best of it with what we have to work with. Can't wait to get back there to get started. We leave FL for good next week
Its surprising what you can live without until you get where you need to be.
Money is always a barrier.
Priorities for winter comfort.

You'll get it done I am sure--cause you got the Dream Bug!!:
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  #29  
Old 08-14-2014, 12:34 AM
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Well we are finally here! I think that was the longest trip every, me, DH, 2 dogs and 3 cats.. what a trip. We have been here for almost a week now. Work has already began. Septic has been completed, well went in today, next is power. That will take a little longer seeing as we have to clear a span 10 ft wide ground to sky for the power co to install the line. Once that is done not sure how long it will actually take them, some of the locals say they are really slow I guess we will find out. Definitely costing more than I expected, but then everything thing usually does. I have also decided that everything here takes twice as long and twice as much effort. You also have to double check everything, found that out the hard way. Brought a generator with us and the person we got it from said it was ready to go. Well I guess he forgot to mention he drained all the oil and we didn't check it, we now have a broke generator and has to buy another. That was not only a hard lesson but a costly one.
Hopefully this week we will get water and sewer lines ran and maybe get started on the electrical. Really not wanted to rush anything because mistakes will be made if we do, but it would be nice to have an indoor bathroom.
I also wanted to say Thank you, the information I have gotten from this forum has been a tremendous help already and I expect it will continue to help us in the future. I will post pics of the progress as soon as I get a better internet connection.
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  #30  
Old 08-14-2014, 02:06 AM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Oh Wow! Fantastic to hear from you.

Take a deep breath..........let it out. Now get to work!
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  #31  
Old 08-17-2014, 11:45 PM
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Finally located a place in the house with a somewhat decent internet connection We have been trying to get as much work as possible done but the weather has not been on our side, it rained for the better part of today. Yesterday was productive, located a wood stove on craigslist for 50.00 and it was exactly what I wanted Also Lowes had a sale on insulation saved almost 3.00 a roll and the rest of the insulation we needed, the salesman gave me a discount on the packages that had damage, saved almost 9.00 a pack. So due to the rain we were able to get some work done inside.
I have to admit this process will take a lot longer than I expected. I know we are only at the beginning stages but I will say this, it doesn't matter how much planning you do in advance things will happen to change you plans. And if you have the idea that any of this will be easy, you will definitely have a rude awakening. I knew going into this it was going to be hard work but it has been a little harder than I expected, but I have no doubts the reward will be well worth it. So it will be one project at a time and more than likely before we know it things will get done and set the way we want them.
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  #32  
Old 08-24-2014, 02:34 AM
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I have to admit this process will take a lot longer than I expected. I know we are only at the beginning stages but I will say this, it doesn't matter how much planning you do in advance things will happen to change you plans. And if you have the idea that any of this will be easy, you will definitely have a rude awakening. I knew going into this it was going to be hard work but it has been a little harder than I expected, but I have no doubts the reward will be well worth it. So it will be one project at a time and more than likely before we know it things will get done and set the way we want them.
How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.
Sounds like you are doing pretty dang good to me.
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  #33  
Old 08-24-2014, 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by OzarksLady View Post
How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.
Sounds like you are doing pretty dang good to me.
I keep reminding myself of that. Right now there are so many things to get done that it can be a little overwhelming, so we slow down and take one thing at a time. Made another great score at a local habitat, got a sink (one of those really deep ones), counter top and toilet.. all for 29.00 and everything was like new. I will be going back periodically to look for more stuff. Still need kitchen cabinets and maybe I will get lucky and find flooring. Don't think we will be getting power anytime soon, but it hasn't been to bad with out it but the generator has helped. Although it has been hot the last few days which makes getting some stuff done a little harder. We are working on clearing trees so we can get the power installed and the want 10 ft ground to sky cleared. With just me and DH doing it by hand we have only completed clearing all the underbrush all the smaller trees are next then will be the rest and some of the trees that have to come down are huge. But on the upside we will have plenty of wood for the stove. One bite at a time.
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  #34  
Old 03-05-2015, 12:45 AM
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It has been several months since I have been able to get back here to post some updates on the progress, which has been moving at a snails pace. We are still off-grid but that will ending soon. Although I have to say it hasn't been bad at all but I don't think I could do it forever. I recently read TxAnne's book and I could relate to so many things she talked about. Btw TxAnne you are inspiration! Thanks to the wood burning stove we have been able to keep our house warm for the most part. I will say it sucks first thing in the morning until you get it roaring again. I have learned to cook all sorts of things on the stove top and have even cooked cornbread and biscuit bread in it. Thank god for my cast iron skillets and dutch oven. I have also learned how to chop wood using a splitting maul and If I do say so myself I think I am getting pretty good at it. I have also learned what wood burns better, how to tell if the wood is too green to burn and how much wood is needed to get a good fire. DH laughs because I have went from working behind a desk on a computer in heels and dress clothes to working outside in jeans and boots. And I couldn't be happier.
My daughter recently came for a visit and it was a little comical when I showed her how we heated our water for bathing and washing dishes but she was a good sport but said she hoped we had power and running water when she came back. I don't think it would have been possible to do this in the summer, we have been able to use mother nature and our cooler to create a freezer, with a little salt and some mason jars we have been able to freeze meat and keep things cold. You just have to use what you have.
We were able to clear the area that will be the future home for our chickens, rabbits and pig. Although we have gotten the rabbits sooner than we had intended. We now have 8 New Zealand and 1 rex. So we have now learned how to make cages and hutch. More cages will be built in the next week or so and we will be choosing our breeding pair. So I guess we are in the meat rabbit business.
We have been snowed/iced in for the past two weeks and finally were able to get out Monday. Again thanks to reading post on here and the many books I've read we were stocked up and had everything we needed and only had to go to the little country store a mile and half away for milk although it was a little cold getting there and back on a 4 wheeler.
Well I will try to get back again soon and post some pics of the progress.
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  #35  
Old 03-06-2015, 08:23 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Oreo23,

Ticks aren't the only bugs to worry about.

A couple of years ago, while working in my garden, I got bitten by a flying insect I'd never seen before. Got a welt on my thigh (was wearing shorts).

Was curious what the heck the insect was (and welt) so went online and keyed in "poisonous insects" for my state; there was a listing of 19 that the IL Dept of Ag wants to classify as poisonous. One insect looked pretty close to what I swatted.

I went downhill after about a week after the bite and it took me nearly a year in physical therapy to get mobile and get my strength back. A friend that had Lyme said that our symptoms were amazingly close. (The specialist I finally went to did blood work and it wasn't Lyme. I had a lot of inflammation throughout my body).

I plan to check out the poisonous insect(s) list for whatever state we decide to finally move to so we have an idea what other insects might be problematic.
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  #36  
Old 03-26-2015, 12:09 AM
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Oreo23,
I have enjoyed reading you adventure story.

First I would like to say we are very familiar with ticks, chiggers & red bugs, and of the three ticks are much easier to deal with in my opinion, but they are all some very nasty little demonic blood suckers to say the least.

We loved the New Zealand Whites we had a number of years ago. They were so cute and loveable it was a hardship to have to kill them, I think that was the reason more than anything else that we gave up raising them.

I have never been hesitant to kill a game animal or domestic one either when it was called for, but the rabbits could not be turned loose because of predators and being in constant contact with them while feeding, watering, providing fresh leafy feed, salt cubes, etc made it much harder when it was slaughter time for the New Zealand's.

We probably came close to having as much contact with the poultry flock, but they were not as as cute and loveable as the rabbits, so when it was time for a fried chicken dinner, just picked out one of the roosters and it was his turn to grace the table.

Please continue to keep us updated about your new life, adventures and pursuits around the homestead.
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  #37  
Old 05-05-2015, 01:54 AM
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Well the weather has improved a lot, spring is here!! This will be our first spring here. I love seeing a the trees getting their leaves back. Everything grows back real fast here. Got all my raised beds built, filled and seeds are in. Everything has started to come up and I am so excited. Kinda funny, but when I look at them growing I am so happy and proud of myself. Although time will tell how successful they are but I think I will have a good harvest (fingers are crossed). A lot a work went into them but it will be well worth it when we are eating the fruits of my labor and it feels good to know you put the work into it for you.
We have now gotten chickens, well a hen and a rooster. Although I didn't want a rooster, some neighbors were moving and gave them to us so I gave him a home. He is old (I think) but he is kinda pretty, if a rooster can be pretty. Had to build a coop and run really fast but I think it turned out ok. Didn't have enough wire to finish the run so we improvised with a tarp. May leave it that way the seem to like the shaded area. It has a very rustic look, lol
2015 024 2.jpg
Love getting an egg every morning so we are planning to get a few more hens and we will be making the coop and run larger. We do plan to free range them once I have my garden fenced off so they can't get to it. One project at a time.
We recently purchased an Alaskan chainsaw mill with the hopes of making our own lumber. Well I have finally used it and made several boards. It was kinda easy to use. Now if I can just keep my chains sharp, cut trees lengthwise dulls a chain really fast. Although I told DH I'm still not cutting down the trees that will still be his job.
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  #38  
Old 05-05-2015, 08:03 PM
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I just got the same mill, but haven't tried it out yet. Did you get a ripping chain or is it dulling a crosscut chain quickly? I heard that would happen, so I ordered a ripping chain from Granberg (the same people that make the mill). I'm hoping that makes a difference?

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  #39  
Old 05-08-2015, 11:33 AM
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I just got the same mill, but haven't tried it out yet. Did you get a ripping chain or is it dulling a crosscut chain quickly? I heard that would happen, so I ordered a ripping chain from Granberg (the same people that make the mill). I'm hoping that makes a difference?

TickFarmer
No we didn't get a ripping chain. I have read mixed opinions about them, some say they are just a regular chain filed to a certain pitch. I started with a brand new chain and some very dry wood and it doesn't seem to be dulling it to fast. When we first got it we cut a green white pine and it dulled it really fast. I will say it isn't that hard to operate though.
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:02 PM
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They are ground to a different pitch - either 0 or 10 degrees. The main difference is in the cutters, and it is a big difference. But, like most things, there are differences of opinions on which is "better".
On my new ripping chain there are 2 (one on each side) sidecutters. They look kinda like just the upright sides of a cutter with a little hook towards the middle of the chain. Following that is 2 hogging cutters that look kinda normal that remove the middle of the cut that was edged by the sidecutters.

https://www.loghomestore.com/photos/ca0010-ripping-schematic.jpg

I have heard that a crosscut chain may kickback a lot more than a ripping chain - the real reason I looked for one, although a ripping chain is not a low-kickback chain design.
I should be trying mine out next weekend (this one calls for lots of rain). I'll let you know how it goes.

TickFarmer
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