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Philosophy Any non-religious philosophical discussions.

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Old 06-30-2014, 01:17 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Default Hegel - Social and Political Thought

Got tired of checking the classifieds for tractors and doing that research, came across this guy.

http://www.iep.utm.edu/hegelsoc/

Some jives, some doesn't. Need to do a lot more reading.

Anyone versed with this Dude's thoughts?


" First, there is the contrast between the attitude of legal positivism and the appeal to the law of reason. Hegel consistently displays a “political rationalism” which attacks old concepts and attitudes that no longer apply to the modern world. "

" Second, reforms of old constitutions must be thorough and radical, but also cautious and gradual."

"Third, Hegel emphasizes the need for a strong central government, albeit without complete centralized control of public administration and social relations. Hegel here anticipates his later conception of civil society (bürgerliche Gesellschaft), the social realm of individual autonomy where there is significant local self-governance."

"Fourth, Hegel claims that representation of the people must be popular but not atomistic. The democratic element in a state is not its sole feature and it must be institutionalized in a rational manner. Hegel rejects universal suffrage as irrational because it provides no means of mediation between the individual and the state as a whole. Hegel believed that the masses lacked the experience and political education to be directly involved in national elections and policy matters and that direct suffrage leads to electoral indifference and apathy.

"Fifth, while acknowledging the importance of a division of powers in the public authority, Hegel does not appeal to a conception of separation and balance of powers. He views the estates assemblies, which safeguard freedom, as essentially related to the monarch and also stresses the role of civil servants and members of the professions, both in ministerial positions and in the assemblies. The monarchy, however, is the central supporting element in the constitutional structure because the monarch is invested with the sovereignty of the state."
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Old 07-01-2014, 02:07 AM
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offgridbob Male offgridbob is offline
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Sounds like a new way to say Socialism.
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Old 07-02-2014, 12:05 PM
MagicHands Female MagicHands is offline
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Default Hegelian dialectic explained

http://www.crossroad.to/articles2/05/dialectic.htm
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Old 07-29-2014, 09:25 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MagicHands View Post
Thanks for the link. Appreciate it.
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