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Old 07-26-2014, 03:39 AM
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Default What was Your first 22.

First one I ever shot was my Dads Winchester model 67 . It was moms first anniversary present to dad. That would have been 1934. I don't think I was even strong enough to pull cocking knob back at age 5-,probably a good thing.

First one that was really mine was a marlin 39a golden Mountie dad gave in 1956 for my 11 th birthday to kill groundhogs. The year before I got a topper 410, but always remember the 22s most .

Still got all three .
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Old 07-26-2014, 11:14 AM
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My first .22 was a Ruger 10/22 , ( Yes I still have it ! ) that was purchased at Service Merchandise. Walked in picked it out, walked out with it for about $120 Not sure if I showed an ID or signed a form back then. Dad had a Winchester model 67 that we all leaned to shoot. Excellent accuracy. A real tack driver. Short, Long, Long Rifle, they all worked.
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Old 07-26-2014, 11:46 AM
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Remington pump-action .22RF. Bought that because I'm a leftist. Was an OK kinda gun, but then I got a Ruger 10/22 and found out that shooting it on the left was not bad after all. I love affair with autoloaders began in earnest after that.
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Old 07-26-2014, 12:58 PM
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The first one that was "mine" was a Mossberg Model 51 that my Grandfather gave me, and I still have it.


The first one I bought myself was a Winchester semi auto in the early 60's, I think a Model 190, that never really worked like it should.

Rugers are my favorites now, but I've owned several different ones over the years, and like most all types and brands
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Old 07-26-2014, 04:19 PM
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In about 1960, when I was 12, dad bought a Winchester model 1890
pump with a hex barrel at an auction.

It was a WRF and I thought that meant winchester rim fire. It busted the cases on the ammo and I thought it was because it was worn out.

He gave me the rifle that day and my son now has it.
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Old 07-26-2014, 05:13 PM
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My first was a Remington 510 single shot. It belonged to my mother who used it when she ran her traps as a kid. Still shots good!
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Old 07-26-2014, 08:57 PM
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My first was a Remington Targetmaster handed down from my dad's uncle to him to me. It was made in May of 1936. I was proud of my very own shootn' arn! Shortly after receiving it I stripped it down and re-blued it with some sort of home re-bluing kit. I refinished the stock too. The stock still looks great. The home re-blueing not so great.

Squirrel hunting with a single shot makes you appreciate every shot, I think that foundation has improved my shooting even today. Given the current supply conditions, a single shot makes sense today too!

My 2nd, and still most favorite .22 was dad's (now mine) Marlin 39 lever action. I think it was made in the 50's. I've hit rabbits on the run with that gun. I don't know if it's the way the gun fits me or if it just has a magic barrel but it's amazingly accurate.

But, true confession, ever since the 70's I've lusted for that browning SA 22 which loads through the stock. I'll never get one simply because there's no need for it but boy oh boy did I ever window shop that little beauty!
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Old 07-27-2014, 02:20 AM
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Glenfield 60. Jammed all the time. Feed throat had a ding on it.

Still have it, still jams. Accurate though.

Dang, Missouri, you're old.
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Old 07-27-2014, 02:33 AM
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Belgian Browning semi-auto for Christmas when I was twelve.
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Old 07-27-2014, 03:27 AM
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Mine was a browning take down that you loaded from the butt stock. I paid 52 dollers for it from a guy who came into the store I worked at needing some food for his family. That was in 1962 I believe. I ended up selling it 20 years later when I needed some money also. I got 350 dollars for it.
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Old 07-27-2014, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridbob View Post
Mine was a browning take down that you loaded from the butt stock. I paid 52 dollers for it from a guy who came into the store I worked at needing some food for his family. That was in 1962 I believe. I ended up selling it 20 years later when I needed some money also. I got 350 dollars for it.
I'm glad I kept mine. Fine little gun that takes down in 3 seconds. Accurate and can be field cleaned without tools.

John Browning was a genius.
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Old 07-28-2014, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
I'm glad I kept mine. Fine little gun that takes down in 3 seconds. Accurate and can be field cleaned without tools.

John Browning was a genius.
I hear ya partner, I have had a number of good guns I wish I would have kept, but most the time they did get me out of a financial problem. Guns are almost as good as gold when it comes to trading or selling. That little browning got where I just could not get the tightening nut tight enough to keep the barrel and the stock solid. I then got a ruger 10/22 and that one I will keep.
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Old 07-28-2014, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridbob View Post
I hear ya partner, I have had a number of good guns I wish I would have kept, but most the time they did get me out of a financial problem. Guns are almost as good as gold when it comes to trading or selling. That little browning got where I just could not get the tightening nut tight enough to keep the barrel and the stock solid. I then got a ruger 10/22 and that one I will keep.
If you take a hone to the base of the adjustment ring/nut you can take just enough off to make the barrel snug again (engage the next adjustment).

Rugers are good guns too. If you get some spare cash look into a barrel from Green Mountain.
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Old 07-28-2014, 05:44 PM
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When I was about 12 years old I had a paper route, and delivered to a hardware store.
They had a Savage 22 Model 15, SS bolt, listed for $13 bucks.

I gave the guy his paper for free, for forever it seemed, @.40 cents a week till I had paid it off. Comes to about 32 weeks.
When it was paid off, I stopped in on a Saturday to pick up my first real gun.

At that point he just laughed and told me that I needed to bring my father down) to pick it up as I was too young. (Hadn't said anything about this before he made the deal).
He figured that my father (who was a friend) wouldn't let me have it and I was screwed out of all the free papers.
That's when I learned that there are a$$ wholes in the world.

So, I rode my bike to the Ranger Station, my father worked for the DNR as the District Ranger.
I told him what had happened and I don't believe that I ever seen him so pizzed off, and learned a few new words that day.

We went back to the store in his car and he lit into the owner about screwing over a kid, a friends kid at that, and when it was over I had my 22, plus 2 boxes of shells, a case and a new hunting hat.
That was the end of a close friendship that day, they stilled talked, but it wasn't the same.
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Old 07-28-2014, 06:27 PM
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I bought a Ruger Mark1 with a bull barrel from a pawn shop for $69 around 1976.
I found out the safety was defective by almost getting shot.
Pawn shop knew it was bad and still sold it.
If the safety was on and you pulled the trigger it would not fire as normal.
However when you released the safety it would fire immediately without pulling the trigger again.
The safety acted like a set trigger.
Took it into a local gun smith, Greenes Gun Shop on Whidbey Island WA. and he repaired it for $6.00 part included.
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Old 07-28-2014, 07:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backlash View Post
If the safety was on and you pulled the trigger it would not fire as normal.
However when you released the safety it would fire immediately without pulling the trigger again.
The safety acted like a set trigger.
Took it into a local gun smith, Greenes Gun Shop on Whidbey Island WA. and he repaired it for $6.00 part included.
Wow! I wonder if that tendency was corrected in the Mark II? I have a couple of those.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randallhilton View Post
Wow! I wonder if that tendency was corrected in the Mark II? I have a couple of those.
From what I have read it was the old Mark 1s that had the problem but even then it didn't happen very often.
I just got unlucky.
My Mark II doesn't have any problems at all.
It's easy to check.
First make sure the gun is unloaded.
Cycle the bolt and put the safety on.
Point it in a safe direction and pull the trigger hard and let it go.
Take your finger off the trigger and then release the safety.
If the gun clicks it's a problem.
I found out when I let a buddy shoot mine.
I loaded it and put the safety on and handed it to him.
He took aim and squeezed the trigger.
Of course it didn't fire.
He took his finger off the trigger and moved the gun to looked at the safety.
He had the gun pointed mostly up and away but when he released the safety and it went off it scared the crap out of both of us.
I took it and locked it up until I got it repaired.
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Old 08-05-2014, 01:55 PM
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My first experience with a .22 was my dad's old Mossberg Model 40 (I think that is the model number), Bolt action similar to the one in Bearfoot's post only dad's loaded from a front tube magazine. Dad had got the gun in trade for a pocket knife or some such. It came with a scope on it, but somewhere down the line dad removed it and the scope subsequently disappeared over time. Dad never could remember what became of the scope. He had no rear sight for it but adapted one from an old BB gun to it which worked Ok..It was actually pretty accurate with that setup. He still has the gun.......My first that I bought was my old Marlin Model 25. I still shoot it on occasion. I replaced the cheapo BB gun type scope woth an equally cheapo Bushnell .22 scope that I bought at Walmart a couple years ago. The thing is a tack driver, and spells instant death to squirrels.
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:43 PM
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Most people have fond memories of their first .22. I do not.


My First .22


The other day, #3 son found the action in the back of a closet and asked me if that was THE .22.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:09 PM
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My first 22 was an Ithica Model 49. One of the single shots that was made to look like a lever gun. It was bought by my grandpa WAY back in the day for my dad who shot it through his childhood and then it was mine. It has killed more opossum, coon, fox, prairie dog, squirrel, rabbit, rats and crows than can be counted even in the time I have had it and still shoots more accurate than me. So much so I have never seen a reason to get another 22...plus being single shot it conserves my ammo.
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