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Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Hunting, Fishing, Trapping and related conversations.

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  #1  
Old 08-06-2014, 10:56 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is online now
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Default Scouting Begins

The scouting season is starting. I know there is another decent buck roaming my property, have found some pretty good tracks.

There's a grass field about .75 miles away from us, with a small herd of about 6 young deer. Two spikes. Will be interesting to see how they develop.

About .5 miles the other way, have spotted what appears to be a healthy estimated 6 pointer and a doe. Solid body on the buck, hopefully I will be able to track his development as well.

It's a buck only season for the area this year, which I welcome. We don't shoot does anyways.

Overall, considering the harsh winter, the herd looks to have pretty healthy numbers.
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Old 08-09-2014, 12:33 PM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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Do you put out any cameras to keep up with the deer in the area?

I run at least 2 cameras all year, though early in the spring it is more for turkey and whatever else steps in front of the camera. I enjoy tending my cameras almost as much as the hunting. Guess it gives me something to do connected to deer hunting all year long. By this time of year I am able to compare pictures of bucks and tell one apart from the other.Right now it appears we have 4 decent bucks in the area, though come hunting season when they start chasing does who knows what will be around.

Here you are allowed two bucks, and doe permits are pretty much unlimited. We used to be so overrun with deer they needed thinning. Between hunting, depredation permits, and EHD we've greatly reduced the numbers, and actually hunting has improved.

Our archery season starts Sept 1st, but I don't think I will start until late in the month. Then again a cold snap comes through and gets you thinking of hunting and I just may have to sit a stand one evening.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:55 PM
joejeep92 Male joejeep92 is offline
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Yeah around here we are starting to see some pretty good bucks even in this stage of velvet. Winter was cold and summer has been hot and dry and not seeing as many deer but definitely seeing quality deer. We really don't use cameras out here, on the land so much it kinda seems redundant although I'm sure it might improve my chances.
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Old 08-09-2014, 06:27 PM
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I don't know if cameras improve your chances, but it is fun to see what's out there, and there are times you can follow a buck from year to year and see the changes.

I've also shot a deer and later gone back over the pictures and found I had a picture of him on the trail camera. Last year my buddy shot a nice 5x4 with archery, and later we were able to go back and find a nice picture of him on the trail cam. Gives you a chance at a before and after picture.
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Old 08-10-2014, 03:56 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is online now
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I just started running trail cams last year. Caught a pic of the buck that I shot.

I haven't put them out this year yet, but next time I head up I will do that. Two on my property and one in my traditional public hunting spot.

I will start bow hunting on the public land in early October. I've been stalking what appears to be a monster in that area, for the last three years. I'm sure it's the same guy - looking forward to see if he looks to be still around.

If that doesn't pan out, then I'll fall back to my land for rifle.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:19 AM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Judging from the deer I've seen in the yard, and around this end of the lake.... Tells me the deer herd took a big hit this last winter...
Deer season in this area, and most areas around, will be bucks only...

However... Most of the does that have come around here do have twins.. That is a good sign...

There have been several bear sightings near here periodically all summer so far... Come to find out, just not that far west of me there are a couple significant bear baits set up... About a dozen or so licensed hunters are baiting there... This is bound to alter the movement of bears in the area... And it seems the pictures and sightings of bears indicate they are significantly bigger than usual...

There seems to be a significant number of bears so far this year... Especially in this area this year...

The motion light on the garage has come on and off during the night lately... Will have to put out my trail cam to see what is going on...
I suspect it is the deer as some of the flower bed stuff is well grazed off..

Good luck....
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:27 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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Early in the spring I put out a salt block, which doesn't last too long between the deer and the rain. But in a few weeks or a month you end up with a hole in the ground they use all the time. I've found spring and summer the salt lick gets used quite a bit, but by fall and hunting season there is not nearly as much use.

I put my salt block on the edge of one of the food plots I make, and then set my camera where it can cover the slat lick and the food plot. This gives me a better chance for pictures because the deer hang around longer. Here's a couple from July.





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Old 08-12-2014, 06:18 PM
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Found a new one today. First time I've seen a split brow tine this year.

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Old 08-12-2014, 08:25 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post
Found a new one today. First time I've seen a split brow tine this year.


What is a "split brow" ?
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Old 08-12-2014, 09:36 PM
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The brow tines are the two smaller points in the middle of the rack, right over the head. Usually there is one on each side, but this deer has two on his right side, which is called a split brow tine.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:54 PM
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The brow tines are the two smaller points in the middle of the rack, right over the head. Usually there is one on each side, but this deer has two on his right side, which is called a split brow tine.
Ahhhh Thanks
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Old 08-13-2014, 05:03 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is online now
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Hunter - damn nice pics. Good solid bodies on those as well.

I put up salt blocks as well. Same as you - they don't last long. But when that block is gone, the meat on the hoof dig and paw the ground to get the minerals.

I'm scouting another area that is heavy with oak and has a lot more rock than my local area. Those minerals seem to have a huge impact on rack size and density. The area gets a lot of pressure during rifle season, but I may be putting up a stand for bow hunting.

Brings up another question - how many stands do us hunters usually put up during a season?

I typically put up two for bow, and two for rifle. After sitting those stands for hours and days, it sure is nice to have a change of scenery after awhile.
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Old 08-13-2014, 10:47 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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The deer do like to dig a deep hole where the salt block was don't they. I have a customer that gives me raw molasses and I've poured that in the hole too.

Quote:
Brings up another question - how many stands do us hunters usually put up during a season?
Well you know what they say. If you have more then one, you'll always be thinking maybe I should be sitting in the other stand today.

That being said we have quite a few stands in place. There are four of us that hunt. My son in law, his friend, myself and my friend. I believe we have a total of 17 stands. Most are tree stands that stay in place all year, plus we have a tripod near a food plot. We also have two enclosed stands, but one hasn't been used for a few years. I usually use my enclosed stand during rifle and especially when it's cold. Nothing like a heated stand on cold mornings.

Here's a Google earth picture of the area we hunt. I found a cheap GPS that attaches to my laptop. I went around all the roads I made, and marked all stand locations. This way everyone has a good idea where all the stands are, and since we meet up each morning when we go out, everyone will know where everyone else is sitting. Keeps it safer that way. The area in the map where we hunt is about 300 acres.

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Old 08-14-2014, 10:14 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is online now
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Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post

Well you know what they say. If you have more then one, you'll always be thinking maybe I should be sitting in the other stand today.


Here's a Google earth picture of the area we hunt.
Discussing what stands each person is going hunt on a particular day\shift is the primary topic at deer camp.

Looks like a nice area there, and you guys certainly have it covered well.

We use google earth extensively for scouting, but we haven't had enough discipline to mark them on the map. We do share the gps coordinates, and we all know our terriory pretty well - plus most of us are helping each other put up stands, works nice.
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:45 AM
hunter88 hunter88 is offline
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Even though we all knew where each stand was, once you saw them on Google earth and envisioned where the other stands were while you were sitting in your stand. Sometimes the location surprised us. You thought the other stand was just off to your left a bit, but when you saw it on the map you realized it was more like right in front of you, or maybe farther off to the left then you thought.

Flat ground with lots of trees, and no good landmarks made accuracy almost impossible. Also the river bend that goes around the ground, and even the road you drive in on to get there, are not lined up north and south. Everything seems to be lined up more northwest by southeast. So that messes with your mind some, and you can't tell someone that I'm straight north of you, when neither of you know that for sure.

Do you have a pretty big area where you hunt?
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Old 08-15-2014, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kachad View Post
Hunter - damn nice pics. Good solid bodies on those as well.

I put up salt blocks as well. Same as you - they don't last long. But when that block is gone, the meat on the hoof dig and paw the ground to get the minerals.

I'm scouting another area that is heavy with oak and has a lot more rock than my local area. Those minerals seem to have a huge impact on rack size and density. The area gets a lot of pressure during rifle season, but I may be putting up a stand for bow hunting.

Brings up another question - how many stands do us hunters usually put up during a season?

I typically put up two for bow, and two for rifle. After sitting those stands for hours and days, it sure is nice to have a change of scenery after awhile.
Learned this the hard way. Last winter on a steep section of the trail it iced up real bad. I had a bag of rock salt, I was using for brine solutions and my brother decided to use some of it to melt the ice. Worked great! However now when we drive the quad and trailer over that section of trail the trailer nearly tips over because the deer have eaten huge holes in the trail. Unintended consequences
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Old 08-16-2014, 04:46 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter88 View Post

Do you have a pretty big area where you hunt?
Very big area.

My future homestead site is about 2.5 miles from the official deer camp. I have started hunting on my 40, but all south of me there's public land for miles.

If you drew a 15 mile diameter circle around our two places, I'm sure there's close to 75% public land. We hunt pretty much within that whole circle.

Within that circle, the environment ranges from typical mixed upland forest, swamps, along with areas that have more oak and ridges. A huge variety.

From one year to the next, things can change significantly - thanks to beaver.

Scouting while grouse hunting is probably the best thing about my deer hunt. Identifying renewed rub\scrape lines, new lines, and constantly looking for new spots while verifying that renewed activity is one of the things that keeps us talking constantly about the hunt.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:55 AM
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With that much hardwood I can see how things can change from year to year, depending on food source and cover. A good acorn crop one year and nothing the next can change movements quite a bit. I remember hunting in Arkansas with a lot of hardwoods, and for a Nebraska boy it was different.

Here the only woods are creek and river bottoms, everything else is corn or soybeans with an occasional alfalfa field. The deer will spread out over all this ground until fall and harvest. Then they head for the river bottom and the woods. Early season you don't notice the extra deer, but by late Dec or Jan they form herds near the woods looking for food and cover. Hopefully I have my deer by then so I don't have to battle the cold to get another deer.

Much of our sign is the same from year to year. I've hunting this ground for 7 years now, and I have a couple places where there is a scrape in the same spot year after year. Our only down side is the ground is flat. Being in the bend of a river there are no hills or valleys to funnel the deer into a specific movement.

From the picture I posted the deer move from the right side of the picture to the left in the mornings, and reverse that in the evenings. That's why most of the stands go top to bottom on the picture. Problem is from top to bottom it's over 1/2 mile and there is probably a trail that crosses every 50 yards, and all these trails have forks in them somewhere along the way. So one night it's this trail the next it's one over or maybe two over. Guess that's why they call it hunting instead of shooting.
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