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  #1  
Old 11-19-2014, 05:04 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Default Sour Dough

I tried several times to produce a sour dough starter with no luck. It would start out great with beautiful bubbles showin up after a while, then a day or so later ....... flat as a flitter as dear ol' Grandma would say. (Anyone know what a flitter is/was? ) Years ago when I lived in Denver I had a guy give me some 150 year old starter he brought back from Alaska that I had great luck with and wanted to get some going so I decided to buy some starter from King Arthur. I love crocks so went ahead and ordered the kit with starter and the crock to keep it in.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/...-and-crock-set

When it comes all you have to do is put the starter-starter in the crock and feed it a few times in the first 24 hours. Then you can put it in the fridge or bake something. I put mine in the fridge, it looks beautiful, as I still have plenty of bread from my last baking day. I'll try to remember to update this when I do bake some bread from it. Noreen from Noreen's Kitchen has a good looking recipe for sour dough biskets.
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Old 12-02-2014, 02:22 PM
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Good luck with your new starter. I'll be interested to hear how it works for you
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Old 12-02-2014, 02:38 PM
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Sorry Ruby, I did make the bread and it turned out wonderful. I have a couple of batches of starter going now. I'm going to dehydrate, then freeze, some when it matures a few weeks/months. Reminds me I need to feed it today.
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Old 12-02-2014, 03:12 PM
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Oldest Son and I have a start---he had started one years ago--but left it in Mn when he moved.

He's so good with it--I let him baby it---I am going to try it in my bread machine loaves.
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Old 12-04-2014, 05:50 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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I've been playing with the sour dough starter. I have 4 batches going now.

One is the orginal that I used to bake the last two loaves of bread. Not much sour taste from the first but it is really good bread. It's had some removed each time I fed it, 2-3 times.

Number 2 is one that I have fed 2-3 times and left out on the counter, without removing any starter, loosely covered with cheese cloth.

The other two I will leave a few weeks then feed to see how long it takes to make it active after it's fed and let sit out 12-24 hours.

A few days ago I took starter #1 out of the fridge and let it set next to starter #2. Yesterday I fed #1 & #2 and this morning was rewarded with a nice tangy sour smell and lovely bubbly starter. I'm making more bread today and am looking forward to having a bit more sour taste to this bread.

Eventually I will try dehydrating some starter for the freezer and some to vacuume seal to see how long it will remain viable.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:43 PM
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You all remind me, that I better get a sourdough started again, before I move.

Back when I was fresh out of college, I got to liking sourdough. I tried starting a culture and had immediate good luck. Whatever was in that house bred in the starter and it was very tasty. Eventually, I started a . . . well, we called it a "coffee house", but it was more like a salon. Folks showed up, and would stay all weekend. On Sundays, I served what became known as "The Pancake Heresy." Sourdough flapjacks for anyone who'd show up-- sometimes 2, sometimes 30. It was called that, because it was like going to church for a lot of people, except the Eucharist was pancakes and syrup instead of wine and bread. It got to be a big thing. Eventually that all kind of peetered out, and I got married and moved to the 'burbs. The last time I did the Pancake Heresy thing was in 1997 or there-abouts when somebody's daughter came back to town to get married, and I made pancakes for 20 to "consecrate" the marriage.

When I got divorced, I lost access to my sourdough-- couldn't get the ex to cough up the starter, so I started over by going to my old neighborhood with a tennis racket out the sunroof of the car and a piece of we cheesecloth over the face of the racket. I drove up and down the streets surrounding my old post-college "coffee house" and then went home and started and infusion. At the time, I was working at a frozen cheeseburger factory, and I told the QC microbiologist of my idea and he had a bloody conniption fit-- said I was going to kill myself.

Within 2 weeks, I had my old culture back! Eventually I got back into the house my ex had, and started making bread, etc. there too. Anyhow, reading this thread, I remembered that now I'm living in a new house, I have to go back over to the old one and get some starter going before I leave there forever.

Thanks for the reminder!
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:48 PM
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I've only recently started messing with sourdough again. My problem has always been starter recipes have you creating enough starter to run a bakery! Then I learned it was possible to have a small, well-behaved starter that can be maintained in the fridge with an occasional feeding.

I had started with Friendship bread starter which, of course, made enough for a community. I gave some away and froze the rest except for a cup which I put in the fridge. The trouble with Friendship Bread starter is that it gets fed with equal amounts of milk, sugar, and flour. It is sweet!

I decided to put it on a diet of equal parts of flour and water, hoping to work the sweet out of it. I'd feed it each week until my jar was full, then make something with it. First was English Muffins. Not too bad, could have cooked longer. Had an odd sugar/sour taste.

Next was pancakes. Or shall I say booze cakes? The sugar was going away, but the alcohol taste was too much!

The other day I did Jackie Clay's recipe for sourdough bread and...it...worked! I have starter and it can be turned into bread! If I decide to make sourdough bread for market I'll just get a bigger jar and give it bigger meals.

Some recipes I've read make my head spin! From what I have read, though, it doesn't matter where your starter comes from. Eventually it will taste like your part of the world
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Old 12-04-2014, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorfdimpaler View Post
When I got divorced, I lost access to my sourdough-- couldn't get the ex to cough up the starter, so I started over by going to my old neighborhood with a tennis racket out the sunroof of the car and a piece of we cheesecloth over the face of the racket. I drove up and down the streets surrounding my old post-college "coffee house" and then went home and started and infusion.
Most people will not even understand what you were doing. I do.
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Old 12-04-2014, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by rubyyarn View Post
Next was pancakes. Or shall I say booze cakes? The sugar was going away, but the alcohol taste was too much!
Just top with some strawberries and whipped cream or ice cream. Presto changeo! Dessert.
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by OzarksLady View Post
Most people will not even understand what you were doing. I do.
You're probably right. The microbiologist couldn't figure it out either. I'll go back through it slowly.

In 1981, I was living in a neighborhood just north of downtown Cincinnati. Back when the houses were built, there were lots of German immigrants and they built breweries all over this part of town. The original occupants of my house moved in around 1902 and raised six kids. Here I was 80 years later, a post-college Yuffie (Young Urban Failure), with lots of friends and looking for ways to feed them on the cheap. I heard about sourdough.

I started my starter from scratch. Flour, water,sugar, and then wait. It took a couple of attempts, but eventually I got a fast growing, good tasting culture going. A quick bit of biology here: What we call sourdough is a combination of a yeast and a lacto-bacillus bacteria living in symbiosis. They're kind of a matched pair. Some make beer, some make bread, some make your feet stink, and some give you nasty diseases. They are in the air all around us and they can live as spores for decades. What I got going in my kitchen was probably something that grew out of these old Germans' kitchen or out of their breweries. It made good bread and it made great pancakes.

Fast forward to 1994. I've moved out. My wife and I are going through a divorce. I get to missing my sourdough and go looking for it. The tennis racket and the wet cloth, held out the window of my vehicle captured spores from the air. I took them home and washed them out of the cloth with aged (no chorine) water and introduced them to a starter.

The starter sort of dictates what you're going to get. In this case, I used unbleached flour, sugar, and water with the consitency of pancake batter. When you're doing this, you make sure there is ZERO animal protein in the starter, for obvious reasons. After a few days, I got bubbles, and I poured a quarter cup of the starter out and introduced it to fresh starter mix. In a week I had my old culture back.

I use 1 gallon pickle jars with loose fitting lids from cat food cans. When I go to use the starter, I take it out of the fridge, stir it up, pour off 1/4 cup to go back into the new starter. That leaves me with 2 cups of starter to use in bread or pancakes. The starter is 2 cups of aged water, 2 cups of unbleached flour, the 1/4 cup of goo from the previous starter and a handful of sugar. It all goes in a clean pickle jar and sits in a warm dark place for a week and then goes into the fridge.
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Old 12-05-2014, 02:35 PM
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Great explanation Dorf.

It's really not that hard to take care of and unless you are baking bread several times a week you can let it sit, in the fridge for months or counter top for days, without feeding it. As soon as you feed it, at least in my case, it comes back to life within hours. In some cases it may take a few days.
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:37 PM
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. . . and as I said: Don't feed it any animal protein or else it becomes carnivorous. You don't want carnivorous slime!
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:51 PM
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If anyone has a recipe for sourdough multigrain bread and wouldn't mind sharing it, I would appreciate it.

One large bakery here would make daily shipments to the area stores for years, then stopped. (They just deliver plain sourdough). I think it might have been the cost of the added grains that they omitted the bread.

A lot of people were unhappy about it.

The bakery also raised the cost of the plain bread at the same time.
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Old 12-06-2014, 01:53 AM
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Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
If anyone has a recipe for sourdough multigrain bread and wouldn't mind sharing it, I would appreciate it.

One large bakery here would make daily shipments to the area stores for years, then stopped. (They just deliver plain sourdough). I think it might have been the cost of the added grains that they omitted the bread.

A lot of people were unhappy about it.

The bakery also raised the cost of the plain bread at the same time.

Connie, I have made any whole grain bread from the sourdough starter yet but there are some really good looking ones on YouTube. I will when I get back from our trip. Our anniversary is coming up. We usually go to St. Croix but this time we are headed to Napa for a few days.
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Old 12-06-2014, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorfdimpaler View Post
You all remind me, that I better get a sourdough started again, before I move.

Back when I was fresh out of college, I got to liking sourdough. I tried starting a culture and had immediate good luck. Whatever was in that house bred in the starter and it was very tasty. Eventually, I started a . . . well, we called it a "coffee house", but it was more like a salon. Folks showed up, and would stay all weekend. On Sundays, I served what became known as "The Pancake Heresy." Sourdough flapjacks for anyone who'd show up-- sometimes 2, sometimes 30. It was called that, because it was like going to church for a lot of people, except the Eucharist was pancakes and syrup instead of wine and bread. It got to be a big thing. Eventually that all kind of peetered out, and I got married and moved to the 'burbs. The last time I did the Pancake Heresy thing was in 1997 or there-abouts when somebody's daughter came back to town to get married, and I made pancakes for 20 to "consecrate" the marriage.

When I got divorced, I lost access to my sourdough-- couldn't get the ex to cough up the starter, so I started over by going to my old neighborhood with a tennis racket out the sunroof of the car and a piece of we cheesecloth over the face of the racket. I drove up and down the streets surrounding my old post-college "coffee house" and then went home and started and infusion. At the time, I was working at a frozen cheeseburger factory, and I told the QC microbiologist of my idea and he had a bloody conniption fit-- said I was going to kill myself.

Within 2 weeks, I had my old culture back! Eventually I got back into the house my ex had, and started making bread, etc. there too. Anyhow, reading this thread, I remembered that now I'm living in a new house, I have to go back over to the old one and get some starter going before I leave there forever.

Thanks for the reminder!
Hello DorfDimpaler, thank you for sharing that story. Made me smile.
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Old 12-25-2014, 02:49 PM
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Today I mixed up two sour dough starters:
-The first using regular baking yeast
-The second using brewers yeast

In a few days we will see what I end up with.
I will post accordingly.
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Old 12-25-2014, 02:50 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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That will be an interesting expermint TM.
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Old 12-26-2014, 06:28 PM
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Well, something is occurring. Both the lids on the containers popped under the pressure of the gas generated by the yeast.
Impressive.
Added more flour, yeast and water or feeding the starter.
Based off various articles about sourdough starters, I should be ready to give it a go by tomorrow afternoon, Sunday at the latest.
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Old 12-26-2014, 09:02 PM
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Well, something is occurring. Both the lids on the containers popped under the pressure of the gas generated by the yeast.
Impressive.
Added more flour, yeast and water or feeding the starter.
Based off various articles about sourdough starters, I should be ready to give it a go by tomorrow afternoon, Sunday at the latest.
Uhhh? Lids popped? You are not suppose to seal or screw them down the lids on sourdough. The best thing to do is use cheese cloth held on with rubber bands.
If you are going to use a lid it needs to be loose.
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Old 12-27-2014, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by OzarksLady View Post
Uhhh? Lids popped? You are not suppose to seal or screw them down the lids on sourdough. The best thing to do is use cheese cloth held on with rubber bands.
If you are going to use a lid it needs to be loose.
Using this site as a reference ( http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.p...=starterprimer ) it says to cover, otherwise it could dry out.

Now, I am confused.
But, I will have to move them to larger container.
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