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  #1  
Old 12-02-2014, 01:50 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Default $$ From Hobbies?

Has anyone here made $$ from their hobbies?

I used to do sweater finishing for a knit shop and work on items on my lunch hour on my regular job. That kept me really busy.

Also sold hand made items on Ebay and through art shows.

Bought discounted fabrics from well-known fabric shops and resold on Ebay.

Sold used knitting books on Ebay; a couple of them sold for $300 and $150.

Some of my biggest finds are through rummage sales where I get $1 bags (with jewelry "scraps") and find 12-14K gold chains, etc. that I sell to a jeweler that a major department store here recommended.

We have a particular rummage sale every year here that has 25 rooms of stuff (a room for books, one for electronics, etc.)
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  #2  
Old 12-02-2014, 10:21 AM
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coaltrain Male coaltrain is offline
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When you start trying to make money from your hobby it becomes a job.
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  #3  
Old 12-03-2014, 01:48 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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I make a bit of money from my hobby selling candles and handknits at the farmers market as well as a couple of local craft shows. I've opened an Etsy shop but never have anything in it. The whole mail-order thing just leaves me cold.

So I'll never be rich doing this, but I make a few bucks doing exactly what I want to do

Now Connie...that girl has it nailed!
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Old 12-03-2014, 05:31 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Many, many years ago.... I had an accountant that told me something very valuable about hobby stuff....

I was contemplating setting up a truck with a portable welder and other equipment on the truck to do mobile welding, repairs, and such on my own time... And at different times I have had the urge to get a computer machine tool of one kind or another for my garage and do things...

The advise was...... Don't get into anything you HAVE to do to make a payment on your hobby..... That is equipment, vehicle etc...

I could still do machine shop data precessing with a couple thousand dollars of software... But I want to make the widget myself... Not just create the data for someone else to make the widget....

So I'm going to say.... If a person can make some money with crafts and a sewing machine, home pressure caner, wood splitter, garden tiller, or what ever...... That is something you already have paid for, or isn't that expensive.... GO FOR IT......

Good luck...
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Old 12-03-2014, 09:58 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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I get $30-$50 a month doing surveys and looking at penny ads on swagbucks. I would be happy to send an invite to anyone that is interested, or you can just google it and sign up. Either will work, though I get a few cents if folks sign up under me.

I have to sit down during the day to rest my legs, and I simply no longer like the TV programs! I think they have gotten pretty dared bad!
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Old 12-03-2014, 11:35 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Terri,

Check out mypoints.com

I've gotten a $25 gift card (from various retailers) almost every month; I give them to hubby so he can indulge himself and pick up wine(s) from one of the department stores we have downtown here that is in the reward program.
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Old 12-03-2014, 11:40 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Wyobuckaroo,

Machine shop data processing....like in tool and dye?

My dad was one of the folks that set up the machinery at the beginning of the shift where he worked. He had some patents that the company paid him for.
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Old 12-03-2014, 11:44 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Wyobuckaroo,

I agree totally about not spending everything you own to start up a business.

The person that opened a knit shop that I did wok for actually used all of her and her husband's retirement savings to do so.

So it didn't work out too well for them (it just struck me like mismanagement).

She had to take a half-way decent paying job out-of-state and would travel back and forth to take care of her ailing husband.

I learned from what was going on. Like don't wipe out your savings.
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Old 12-04-2014, 03:20 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coaltrain View Post
When you start trying to make money from your hobby it becomes a job.
Everytime someone tries to get me to start putting out decorated eggs by the dozens that is what I tell them.
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Old 12-04-2014, 03:41 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
Terri,

Check out mypoints.com

I've gotten a $25 gift card (from various retailers) almost every month; I give them to hubby so he can indulge himself and pick up wine(s) from one of the department stores we have downtown here that is in the reward program.
I belong to that, but I earn very little at it! I rarely do the surveys, because I don't hink they pay much. I do click on the ads!
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  #11  
Old 12-04-2014, 08:18 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
Wyobuckaroo,

I agree totally about not spending everything you own to start up a business.

The person that opened a knit shop that I did wok for actually used all of her and her husband's retirement savings to do so.

So it didn't work out too well for them (it just struck me like mismanagement).

She had to take a half-way decent paying job out-of-state and would travel back and forth to take care of her ailing husband.

I learned from what was going on. Like don't wipe out your savings.
The trouble with a storefront is all of the overhead. Rent, utilities, etc. All of that has to be paid whether you sell anything or not. I used to want my own shop but decided it would cramp my style way too much. Let alone the financial drain.
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  #12  
Old 12-05-2014, 12:38 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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rubyyarn,

I had a vintage clothing store back in '84. (Vintage clothing was popular at the time, at least here in Chicago). I would come in after work and run the shop.

I had contacts with several buyers scouting out clothing sources so had some well-known designer label garments; one was a late 1920s Channel. (Dress and jacket).

One of my favorites was a "bubble" dress (1950s).

I had layaway, too. LOL.

Several of my strategies:

- Go to rummage sales - would pay no more than $2 for a dress (like the bubble). Sold for $89.

- I had a "sales" rack next to my counter; just about everyone had to buy an item off of it. On one half of it, I had "hold" items (for fake customers) that were "overdue", meaning they hadn't come in to pay for the layaway item. So now I could sell it since it was available. People would actually come in and track the item(s) to see if they had been paid for.

- Made use of "donations" which people would leave at my door. Definitely were vintage; oldest piece I received was a "mourning hat" from the 1870-80s (looked like a pillbox hat with an extremely long veil). I decided to donate it to the Chicago Historical Society.

- One lady that lived across the hall from my shop left a box of 40 souvenir spoons. She asked for $20 for all of them. I called around and found out they were selling for lowest $25 to $75 individually.

I got written up in the neighborhood newspaper and ran an ad there.

One day there were new neighbors next door to me - a beauty shop. I stopped by a month into it and said hello; the place didn't look too "beauty shop" like for some reason. I started paying more attention to the activity there. One night (in autumn) I decided to sit in our car and scope out the place (we had large windows facing the main street). I saw a bunch of guys going in and out - definitely not doing hair. I found out there was a neighborhood watch group down the street from me, so I contacted them.

One day a few days later, I had just opened up and this fellow walked in. He seemed "not a customer" so to speak. I sort of waited for him to say something. Turns out he was a narcotics person. He said I was right about next door; he was about to confront them, so he advised locking my door, pulling the shades down and getting down behind something. Which I did.

He went next door and a scuffle ensued. There was something happening in the hallway that sounded like pushing and shoving. Turns out he arrested the owner.

The only other exciting thing there was when the hallway bathroom had sewer gas back up.
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  #13  
Old 12-05-2014, 12:57 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Terri,

My Points has sort of gone down the tubes with their surveys...repetitive and 1,000 questions and then you're not eligible...

It was okay when I signed up, but I read someone complained that the surveys/opportunities had changed (which I wasn't familiar with).

I do get a lot of medical-related surveys asking about hospitals, doctors, etc. I've never gotten one that didn't give me the full points or cut me off half-way filling them out.

Have you ever done mystery shopping? Did that for a while. The companies that do the surveys/hire are connected with bigger stores, like Macy's. They will give you one "free" job (for training purposes) and help work you through it. They are very particular with their forms/terminology. They will reject for non-conforming info/answers.

Each store has a set of questions/things to ask/look for, so you get used to the routine.

What did it for me after about a year was that I spent 2 hours on the correct floor looking for a certain clothing line (at Macy's) and the clothes were not on the floor. I tried other floors (asking and physically going there). The company was closed at the time they assigned me. I was exhausted and POed.

The company admitted they messed up; I couldn't give them a write-up since I didn't evaluate anything. So I didn't get paid.

Not a total waste of time because the next time I was in Macy's (as a customer) I let the departments know who the company was and how to tell who the mystery folks were.

You know those stores that have cashiers/clerks that act like they're doing you a favor? If you want to get service out of certain sales clerks, one way is to watch who they like to converse with. Then, mention that you do mystery shopping. The next time you go in, all of a sudden you get smiles, HELP with finding an item, etc. Even them going through the recent flyer getting coupons for you. (I was fine with just being pleasant, but they insisted).

One store, I tried the "tip" method. The photo developing clerk had some sort of problem so at Christmas time, I saw the cosmetics clerk who was nice and gave her a small appreciative tip. The next time I was at the store, just about everyone was happy and helpful. Including the photo clerk that used to yell in my direction as I left with my 3-4 rolls of processing 24 pictures apiece. (Well, digital cameras solved her problem, LOL).
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Old 12-05-2014, 01:43 AM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Wonder how it would work with a rude clerk to say "You know I love being a mystery shopper" and just walk away.
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Old 12-05-2014, 02:30 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Oh Lord I hate to shop!

I saw that and I was tempted, but I decided that there were other, more pleasant things I could do for cash!!!!!!
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  #16  
Old 12-07-2014, 07:06 PM
Ellendra Female Ellendra is offline
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I think I made about $30 last year selling seeds. Before that, I made about $200 one year doing custom sewing.

I'm hoping to expand my garden and have a seeds/herbal products business. I like dinking around in the garden, but I'm not much on interacting with people, so online sales are the best option for me.

My day job takes most of my time right now, so I can't do as much with my hobbies as I'd like to. That may change, there are signs at work that the company is in trouble. In which case, I at least want to have things ready so I can have a back-up plan if and when it goes under.
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  #17  
Old 12-08-2014, 12:54 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Ellendra,

Custom sewing - cool idea!

Few (younger) people seem to know how to sew.

When I was in my 20s, I did a favor for a couple of friends and took apart their dresses and "redesigned" them. Had one friend that was hard to teach sewing to; she would do thins like sew the top to the bottom of a pant leg. Also cut off part of the leg (don't ask). Well, I told her to take it home (we lived in the same apartment building) and see if she could figure out a solution for the problems she created. She actually did pretty well.

I'm the same way with selling. Rather do it online or a catalog. Hubby used to be a sales person when he first started working. Now he can't stop talking to everyone, LOL

The seed idea sounds great. I saw a TV show while I was laid up in the hospital one time about Monsanto and their seeds and what they were doing to farmers.

Do you have any on-line free websites planned for your products yet?

Try Vista Print for free business cards. (Check Walmart for some Vista Print offers, too).
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  #18  
Old 12-16-2014, 06:19 PM
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CarolAnn Female CarolAnn is offline
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Making some money from a hobby sounds nice. My hobbies only cause money to go OUT, not back into the account!

When I retire, I've thought I might like to do some volunteer custom sewing for people who have had surgical appliances to deal with. I had a relative who lived with a rod through her hips for about six months while a bad break healed up - and it was the very dickens for her to find anything that would fit around it. (It actually stuck out the sides and had a cross-brace in front.) But again - that wouldn't make me any money, it'd just feel good to be helping someone.

I just realized I've spent more than $150 on books, materials and tools for felting, and all I've made so far is one mouse. That's an expensive rodent!
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:48 AM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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Realize if you do "custom" sewing, it is not a common talent and don't short yourself. Many people don't make money at hobbies because they don't consider their time and talent into their prices. Even if you are doing part of it to help other people, you need the income to continue to help them, not just making enough to pay direct expenses.
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Old 12-17-2014, 12:15 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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i have sold stuff i made, but the goal wasn't to make money it was to cover the costs of the stuff i made, or it was an outlet for excess stuff. I like to do coal burning style woodwork (using hot coals from a fire to burn wood into shape, make spoons and bowls and other stuff) but there are only so many wooden spoons that i need in the kitchen, so i sell the excess when i can find a buyer, then i make more, usually the extra experience lets me make better ones. if i wasn't selling off the extra i might find myself with buckets full of wooden spoons and no practical use for them all.

i also pick up broken tools on the curb and repair them, however i have no need for 30 spade shovels in my shed so i regularly sell the extra ones.

making money from hobbies shouldn't be a goal but rather a way to clear out clutter and cover costs, once its a goal its no longer a hobby
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