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  #21  
Old 01-08-2015, 10:22 PM
Leanne Female Leanne is offline
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I've been making my last couple batches with Fage (a Greek brand) as my starter, and it's been fine. A bit gooey in texture, but still very yogurty. It seems to me that every batch turns out a little different. Nancy's brand yogurt as a starter makes a "firmer" yogurt, but the batches seem to give off about the same amount of liquid regardless of what starter I use. Yogurt's a living thing, like yeast bread, so some inconsistency is normal. We're not doing this in controlled lab conditions, after all.

I'd be more inclined to take a look at the milk you used, rather than the starter. Did you use milk with a different fat percentage? Whole milk makes the thickest yogurt with the least whey, nonfat makes the thinnest, with the most whey. The incubation time shouldn't make a whole lot of difference. From what I understand, it's more about how tangy the yogurt gets, as most batches have turned into yogurt after a few hours, but the longer it sits, the tangier it gets.

Also, what was your ratio of starter to milk? I use 1/2 c. starter for 8 c. milk. That seems to work out pretty well. It's possible that you either didn't use enough or used too much.
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  #22  
Old 01-09-2015, 03:26 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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The big difference was using the Greek yogurt with cream instead of the Fage for the starter and a smaller batch....same milk/time (2%) as with the first batch. Used 1/4 cup starter to 3 cups milk. Made a small amount because I wasn't sure how it would turn out with the different starter.

It was edible but seemed so different from the first batch. So I figured I messed up on experimenting with the different yogurt hubby brought home... ?

If I hadn't strained it, it would have been really too "loose". That was another difference from the first batch.
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  #23  
Old 01-09-2015, 04:28 AM
Leanne Female Leanne is offline
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Ah. I think that might be the problem actually a touch too much starter, as it should be c. to 4 cups, not c. to 3 cups. That effect seems similar to what happens when you use too much sourdough starter the bread rises too quickly and deflates a lot, and you get flat, unexciting bread. I could see that being a potential cause of the problem.

I really don't think that the cream in the starter yogurt would be a big problem. The yogurt's been sitting in the grocery store, so the biological reaction from the bacteria would still continue. However, it might be true that the lactobacillus strains in this brand are different than the ones in the other brand you normally use, and so they interact differently, or it might be that you got an older container of yogurt where the culture was on its way out. Hard to say.
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  #24  
Old 01-10-2015, 03:01 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Leanne,

It should have been PERFECT since I found out that hubby paid $5.50 for the pint-sized container of Greek Yogurt!!!!!! His eyes bugged out when I told him I noticed the price on the lid today. Whoee! (One time I sent him out for a can of mushroom soup from the big grocery store two blocks away and he came back with a can of GOLDEN mushroom soup. So close....

The store he bought it from (down the street from us) is a produce "convenience" store. When I was in there to check it when I opened, I knew it was big $$. (I think the yogurt is more expensive than at Whole Foods, LOL). So I stay out of it. Got to make sure hubby stays out if it. It was cold out, and I think he was focused in getting what I needed on my list.

Food here costs as much as medicine, LOL.

Today he did bring another small container of plain FAGE. So will try again tomorrow.
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  #25  
Old 01-12-2015, 03:44 AM
Leanne Female Leanne is offline
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Holy ~ !

That's more than I pay for a quart of organic! Okay, not Greek-style, but still! You're not kidding about costing more than Whole Foods.

Good luck with your next batch!
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  #26  
Old 01-14-2015, 02:30 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Hi

Made the adjustment to the amount of starter like you suggested and it turned out great! Didn't have to sit all that long, either.

WAY less whey this time, even after straining. Before, it was like almost two cups!

I used to use Dannon in the old days, but for some reason, it only comes in a large size for plain and vanilla.

They only carry tiny (looks like) 1/2 cups with fruit. Sure miss the ones they carried in the '70s.
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  #27  
Old 02-19-2015, 02:49 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Hi All!

Well, it happened again...the curdsy yogurt with a lot of whey.

I think I figured it out.

The milk (2%) I bought (on sale) is "ULTRA PASTURIZED" (saw it stated on the carton). I've heard of ultra pasturized whipping cream, but not milk.

Had just bumped into a statement on a milk/cheese site that talked about avoiding this sort of milk for yogurt - will get curds.

Then they went on to say in India, lots of folks make "curds" every day.

This is coagulating but not sure what it will look like in the morning. The article also said that only incubate for curds 6-8 and not more and need to refrigerate, or else it goes south (curd consistency).

Can't remember what sort of milk I used for the "yogurt texture" before. But I think I know what to look out for now.
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  #28  
Old 02-20-2015, 02:23 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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My yogurt recipe;

2 C. Whipping cream
3 3/4 C. Whole milk
6 oz Greek yogurt
1 C. Powdered Nido brand milk. It is the only dry milk I will use.

Note; This will fill up 7, 8oz jelly jars full to the top.
I save back one jar for my starter for the next batch.

Heat cream and milk to 185 stirring often.
Cool to 110.
Stir in powdered milk and yogurt.
Mix well.
Pour into 7 single serving (for us it's two servings) containers or 1/2 pint jelly jars.
"Cook" for 19 hours.
I have a Wearing yogurt maker. It has a timer and the longest time is 19 hours. The longer you let it "cook" the better the flavor. I often set it for 3-5 hours more when the timer shuts it off.

You will have this lovely layer of firm yogurt on the top that FTWB and I just love. No, it's not low calorie, but it's soooo much better than using low fat or 2% milk, or even whole milk by it's self.
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