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Old 12-23-2014, 06:54 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Why is it that people:

1. Think you are suppose to produce art/crafts for 3rd world prices?
2. Think that 4-5 days is plenty of time if you are willing to work 20 hours a day to get a gift ready that they "just have to have".

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Old 12-23-2014, 09:52 PM
m37 Male m37 is offline
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i see this almost every day at our shop, some people have no concept on pricing and others like to haggle over pricing and some people are just damn insulting.
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Old 12-23-2014, 10:05 PM
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That why it's free market system , --any contract take a willing buyer and a willing seller to do the deal .
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 12-23-2014 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 12-23-2014, 10:53 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissouriFree View Post
T , --any contract take a willing buyer and a willing seller to do the deal .
You got one thing right there but it was not the seller part.
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Old 12-23-2014, 11:48 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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The best way I found (for myself) is to say, "OK" (can't refuse business, LOL) but charge WAY more than they'd be willing to pay for a "rush" job and one that I could take them up on if they accepted. That way, it sets a value on your product and time; if they pay, you get paid what you think you're worth.

I never take less on an established price unless I generate coupons as a promotion, and then would only do it on one or two items, tops and not on a regular basis.

I love it when some folks "make an offer". They also look for problems with your product(s) in order to chew your price down. Then there's the "end of the day of the fair syndrome" where they think you'll sell at a way low price not to have to take an item back home.

I was at one outdoor fair where a store owner approached me with an "doing you a favor" attitude to have my items in her store. I told her to buzz off. She's out of business now, LOL.

I've had items in Hallmark, but I put together a presentation with my best pieces. Also had items in beauty salons.

Some customers can be real jerks.
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Old 12-24-2014, 09:47 AM
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Many Americans expect Wal-Mart prices for everything.
Others seem to think haggling is still apart of non-box store pricing. In some instances it might be true if the seller is willing to engage in that kind of business practice.
If I were selling crafts, I think I would find it insulting if someone tried to talk down one of my pieces.
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Old 12-24-2014, 10:30 AM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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One of the women at the farmers market makes very good yeast bread and rolls. She had someone come up the last hour and want a bargain. She refused (anything she doesn't sell she gives to the senior citizens that live where she works, some pay, some don't) and told me she couldn't understand why they thought the stuff she would sell them somehow was less expensive to make than the stuff she sold earlier.
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Old 12-24-2014, 09:11 PM
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Don't you just love folks who think you can just 'whip up' something and be glad to do it?

I do sometimes contribute some of my work as raffle prizes for a local fiber fair, and I will make random gifts for friends. But as far as the farmers market or craft fairs, my price is my price. Once a year I discount the candles that are looking a bit shopworn.

I've gotten the 'I can get it cheaper at Wal-Mart' and I just nod and smile. But I'm thinking "You're in the wrong place aren't you?"
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Old 12-25-2014, 01:22 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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rubyyarn,

Are your candles "all natural"?

If it were me, I'd list my ingredients vs. Walmart's.

Then you could tell customers that they can't get it cheaper at Walmart, because they don't carry your special candles there.

Do you also get the "I can do this" spiel and then they ask how YOU did it. Hubby would like to get into it but I stepped on his shin a couple of times under the table to interrupt him. (Giving out trade secrets is a no-no!) I actually experienced someone making a big deal out of my making my items; she made a big scene and kept going as she walked away - "YOU make these??" (Hubby was there). Yeah, watcha think HE made them? LOL

Oh, don't trip while you're shouting back at me while you're walking away.

Takes all types.
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Old 12-25-2014, 12:42 PM
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Connie, my candles are made of natural waxes, usually palm since it holds color better. I've learned to put the soy candles in tins where light can't fade the color.

When folks ask how I do it, I say "Oh, I just melt the wax and stick the wick in." Finding the right wick is the hard part, and it varies with the candlemaker, the wax, and the fragrance oil. No way anyone could duplicate what I do without sitting down and figuring it out for themselves. And I'm still learning.

I've learned that customers have codes for "I don't plan to buy, at least from you." What my husband and I call the Kiss of Death is "I'll be back after I've seen everything." We often see those customers slinking down the far side of the street with someone else's candle in their hand. I've learned not to count an item as sold until money changes hands.

I do enjoy this business, though
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Old 12-25-2014, 07:35 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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rubyyarn,

"...slinking down the far side of the street" - sounds familiar, LOL.

I haven't made candles, but I've looked over instructions and you have to really think on what you're doing (which most folks don't appreciate). I'll bet your candles are wonderful.

I have sensitivities to odors/chemicals and the room (spray) and candle deodorizers are out. But I love candles.

Have you thought of selling on Etsy? (Hubby just asked).

I wonder if you could get into Walmart if you did a selling presentation.

Do you watch Shark Tank? I LOVE the show.

This was my very first art show (in my neighborhood):

http://www.57thstreetartfair.org/ I'ts been around a while. Lots of vendors, music, food.

I sold 635 hand mirrors (most on Saturday) at $25/piece (tax included).

I had just gotten there and was trying to set up (just had a borrowed folding table and patio umbrella from the event-coordinator). I "hired" a really nice young lady (14 - have a picture of her/our table) whose mother was a Chicago cop that worked at the art center here with hubby (she worked part-time). I was taking out my mirrors (still in bags) when people wanted to buy and it kept going. Hubby asked why I wasn't set up yet, LOL. I actually couldn't find time to eat lunch and he finally made me sit down for 10 minutes. (I stand and say hello to people as they pass and for the most part, they come over on their own to look at items).

There's a weather tradition here on the art fair weekend that one day is sunny and one day is rainy. The first day (Saturday) for my first fair was super nice and sunny.

I actually sold one of my Egyptian-themed mirrors to a gentleman whose girlfriend was due in less in a week to take a trip to Egypt. I gave him a lot of inside tips I thought she could use.

The art fairs here after that year started to be less attended (we had the 9/11 attack). I think that's when the economy started to slip. However, the entry fees were getting really expensive - $250/300 for two days at locations for other fairs. So I got a free website going to take up slack.

I did have a problem with some people trying to sell items that weren't paying vendors. One woman with a rolling black suitcase kept hanging at my booth and started pitching customers mulling around my table. She was selling food of all things, in 90+ degree heat!! (Not on ice or a cooler). She mentioned she had her food items in the local health food store here. I first politely asked for her to leave; she went off. So I went to look for a security guard. She finally left my booth, but I saw her sneak in again, later. I actually called the health food store (I've been living in this area since 1972 and get to know owners). The owner said this person had been in, TRYING to get him to accept her food items, but she didn't have the necessary work done and the food was unstable. She also tried selling on the street (probably without a license) but same problem with food stability. Scary!
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Old 12-25-2014, 08:12 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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rubbyyarn,

Don't I wish -

It was $635 of mirrors at the end of the first day, LOL. (Hubby just said to "check your figures").
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Old 12-25-2014, 08:23 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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Connie, I was set to be absoultely floored. 635 mirrors? Now I'm just majorly impressed. Good work!

I have an Etsy shop, I'm just to chicken to stock it. Actually, I'm a terrible photographer. But I have things like lace shawls that don't sell locally, so I really need to get my nerve up and post them on Etsy!

The woman with the suitcase just sounds strange! Around here it is considered a no-no to hawk in the street like that. You have to stay in your own booth.
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Old 12-26-2014, 11:03 AM
ScrubbieLady ScrubbieLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
rubyyarn,

Are your candles "all natural"?

If it were me, I'd list my ingredients vs. Walmart's.

Then you could tell customers that they can't get it cheaper at Walmart, because they don't carry your special candles there.

Do you also get the "I can do this" spiel and then they ask how YOU did it. Hubby would like to get into it but I stepped on his shin a couple of times under the table to interrupt him. (Giving out trade secrets is a no-no!) I actually experienced someone making a big deal out of my making my items; she made a big scene and kept going as she walked away - "YOU make these??" (Hubby was there). Yeah, watcha think HE made them? LOL

Oh, don't trip while you're shouting back at me while you're walking away.

Takes all types.
When I get asked anything about making Scrubbies, I just smile. I will tell them that I use nylon net and that it is a fabric. That is it. I did have the teenager of a customer (not a looker), tell me the basics of how I made them but I just smiled and didn't answer.

I have gotten a LOT of my grandma, aunt, old lady at the church or whoever makes them and gives them away.
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Old 12-26-2014, 12:03 PM
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I made scrubbies for a while and sold them for $2.00. After a while I decided that I did not enjoy the process and gave up on them. I will make them for people who ask for them and I know will actually buy them.

I find pricing the hardest thing about selling crafts...
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Old 12-26-2014, 01:11 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Now if anyone wants to know how to make anything the internet makes it so easy. I even have my husband using Google and YouTube to learn how to do all kinds of things. Last year sometime he was working on his car and said he was going to have to go to one of the auto supply houses and see if they could tell him how to do something. I suggested he use YouTube. I had suggested this several times over the years for one thing or the other. He had never listened to me before, but this time.........

https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...make+scrubbies
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Old 12-26-2014, 02:58 PM
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rubyyarn Female rubyyarn is offline
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I have discovered over a long and crafty life that most crafts are quite simple to do, but not many people will sit still long enough to do them.
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Old 12-26-2014, 07:44 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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ScrubbieLady,

You know what would bother me - if you laughed after I told you how you made them. And then waved me (friendly-like) and then went on to do something else or talk to someone else.
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Old 12-26-2014, 07:51 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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OzarksLady,

They NEVER listen to us, do they?
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  #20  
Old 12-26-2014, 08:58 PM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
OzarksLady,

They NEVER listen to us, do they?

Rigth you are. Though he is pretty good about it most times.
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