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  #1  
Old 02-18-2015, 04:49 PM
cmdan cmdan is offline
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Default Property Survey?

Hi all,
I am looking for a couple of my property markers and have a question: How do you read the reading on the as built sheet? it has S 49deg 20' 18" E............what does that mean and how do they come up with it?

Thanks
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:08 PM
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Not sure what you are asking, when i was in college for my degree in forestry I took some surveying classes (to identify property boundaries for timber sales). sounds like they are instructions to find a point of reference. South 49 could be compass directions (360 degrees) but it might be GPS location in degrees minutes and seconds.

surveys as i was taught were based on known points using total stations to locate other points, elevation surveys, compass and line tape, etc. a lot of people around here now use a GPS reference for the corners of their property. a friend of mine who works for a municipal planning office does surveys like that, mapping out roads, water lines, etc. not as accurate as lisenced surveyors (who's maps are legal documents) but accurate enough for what they need to do, same as with forestry work.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:15 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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sounds like it is GPS points, they are based on Latitude and Longetude. 45 North is exactly half way between the equater and the north pole, 49 south would mean your either in Asia, south America, or Africa, slightly closer to the south pole than equater, a second number would determine where you are based on westerly directions.

for instance 45 degrees 5' minutes, 32" seconds North, and 74 degrees, 33 minutes' minutes and 10" seconds would be a point somewhere in south eastern Canada
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
it has S 49deg 20' 18" E............what does that mean
If it's a corner on your survey map, there should be a marker of some sort

If the map or description gives that number and says "SIP" that means they
"Set an Iron Pipe" on that point, and they are generally 4-6 inches below the surface in a yard, and often several feet above the surface in wooded areas.

You can usually find the buried ones with a good metal detector

Last edited by Bearfootfarm; 02-18-2015 at 05:50 PM.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:27 PM
cmdan cmdan is offline
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I did change the numbers a little so I wouldn't give out my exact location.

So ' = minutes not feet and " = seconds and not inches??

the first part is really S 59 degs, and I'm in Alaska so it doesn't sound like that is the kind of reference they are using.

Ok, I think I get the 49 degs, I can figure that out on a compass, but what is the rest of it?
And why does it say S 49 degs? isn't 49 degs on a compass just 49 degs?

So, what is:

S 49 degs

20'

18" E
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
And why does it say S 49 degs? isn't 49 degs on a compass just 49 degs?
A compass heading is a given direction in relation to where you are

A Lat/Long coordinate is a precise place on a map grid

Even though some of the terms are the same, the meanings are very different

http://www.itouchmap.com/latlong.html

Latitudes are always North or South, and Longitudes are East or West and + or -

The "minutes and seconds" are actually distances, even though they sound like "times"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latitud...es_-_Globe.svg

You can't follow those directions with a magnetic compass, since they are based on "True North" and not "Magnetic North"

You will need a transit to be precise, although on small plots a compass along with the description will get you close enough.

Another trick is to use Google Earth to show you where it should be

http://www.wikihow.com/Read-a-Land-Survey

Last edited by Bearfootfarm; 02-18-2015 at 05:49 PM.
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:50 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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Those 3 numbers just give a compass bearing, or line from a start point. GPS coordinates would have both a longitude and latitude number also in degrees, minutes, and seconds and would reference a fixed point

If you can't find any of your boundary markers or stakes (is it a recent survey,or years old???), it might pay to have a new survey done just to re-establish the corners. Or get a copy of the original survey from the courthouse--it is the legal description of your property and will have all the corners and other property line directions clearly marked on it. What you are looking for is language like

starting at a point located---, from there proceed--(a bearing) for x number of feet --and so forth all around your property

Good luck.

JVC
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Old 02-18-2015, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvcstone View Post
Those 3 numbers just give a compass bearing, or line from a start point. GPS coordinates would have both a longitude and latitude number also in degrees, minutes, and seconds and would reference a fixed point

If you can't find any of your boundary markers or stakes (is it a recent survey,or years old???), it might pay to have a new survey done just to re-establish the corners. Or get a copy of the original survey from the courthouse--it is the legal description of your property and will have all the corners and other property line directions clearly marked on it. What you are looking for is language like

starting at a point located---, from there proceed--(a bearing) for x number of feet --and so forth all around your property

Good luck.

JVC
JVCs right it is a bearing from one point to another. Look at the otter end of that line and you should see a bearing back to to the first point( if the surveyor was thorough).

If you can locate of you property points a decent gps unit or a lensatic compass should get you to all points( if they are still there)
http://m.dickssportinggoods.com/prod...952&cadevice=m


You may be able to get more info from you county. Many now have a geobase plate map on line that shows you property boundaries with lots of detail to include satellite photos
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
If you can locate of you property points a decent gps unit or a lensatic compass should get you to all points( if they are still there)
Surveyors don't use Magnetic North, so a compass is pretty useless, and even if it were Magentic North, a cheap compass won't show minutes and seconds

The last time I had some land surveyed, they used about $40,000 worth of GPS equipment to get the needed precision
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Surveyors don't use Magnetic North, so a compass is pretty useless, and even if it were Magentic North, a cheap compass won't show minutes and seconds

The last time
Did I say that . No ! Get a grip !
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:30 PM
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I had a place surveyed several years ago... The numbers you list sound like directions from a known point in the township or range commonly used as a well known starting location... There could have been more than 1 of these known locations involved that day..... For instance.... I suspect the most common location known in this area is the corner of the township which also is the corner of the county, where it joins the other three adjacent counties... As the 4 counties come together in a single point...

For instance... The guy who surveyed my place set up a kind of gps transmitter at a know point in the township.... I suspect the most common location known in this area is the corner of the township which also is the corner of the county, where it joins the other three adjacent counties... As the 4 counties come together in a single point...

Then his equipment would pickup and use that signal transmitted by the sender that is part of his "kit" to find 1 or two locations... From there on it is easy enough to get the other property corners by conventional survey techniques regardless of how the property is shaped... It was tough to get the details I got, let alone the depth of detail I wanted about this process.... KnowwhatImean....

Good luck...
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Old 02-18-2015, 10:13 PM
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They're called " waypoints".
Popular word since advent GPS, it has been used to navigate for long long time.
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Old 02-18-2015, 10:35 PM
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Quote:
Did I say that . No ! Get a grip !
You certainly implied it
Get a new catch phrase
Your current one is boring
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Old 02-18-2015, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
You certainly implied it
Get a new catch phrase
Your current one is boring
Why can't you contribute to the discussion instead of being so contranian ? Instead of disrupting it all the time ?
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Last edited by MissouriFree; 02-18-2015 at 11:02 PM.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
Why can't you contribute to the discussion instead of being so contranian ? Instead of disrupting it all the time ?
If you were paying attention, you'd see I have contributed facts to the discussion, and posted links that verify those facts

Stop whining and get a grip
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Old 02-19-2015, 11:57 AM
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This is a timely discussion for me. I had my property surveyed when we first bought it 20+ years ago. I have the same type readings on my map like cmdan has. The surveyor did sink pins on one end of the property that is woods - then two sides are obvious one being the road and one being the river. But one side - and the side that I need to know the exact line - there were no pins set. I guess the reason is that was said above is because it is mowed lawn area. I need to identify this line - really wish there were GPS coordinates for the corners but there aren't. And I can't afford to have another survey done.

Is there a way to interpret those readings and be accurate? I have a very nicely drawn map from the original surveyor but he has since retired and not available to help me.
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:28 PM
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Land surveyors use "quadrant bearings". Google it to learn more.

This: S 49deg 20' 18" E
is an example of a quadrant bearing.

A quadrant bearing is almost always followed by a distance.

When you see a quadrant bearing in a legal description it means that the land has been surveyed.

Quadrant bearings have *nothing* to do with GPS.

Land surveys usually have a "basis of bearing". This means that the surveyor picks two known points and arbitrarily defines the distance beween those two points as due north (or due east or south or west). All the bearings on the survey are based on that arbitrary "basis of bearing".

In other words, usually the bearings on a survey are not based on true north nor are they based on magnetic north. Instead, the bearings are based on a line between two known points.
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Is there a way to interpret those readings and be accurate? I have a very nicely drawn map from the original surveyor but he has since retired and not available to help me.
It's likely your county has online property maps with aerial views.

I've found corner stakes by looking at those maps

Yours are probably there but set below the surface

It helps to have a LONG tape measure, or a measuring wheel if the surface is fairly level, and a metal detector if they are buried
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
It's likely your county has online property maps with aerial views.

I've found corner stakes by looking at those maps

Yours are probably there but set below the surface

It helps to have a LONG tape measure, or a measuring wheel if the surface is fairly level, and a metal detector if they are buried
The map I have is good and very detailed - it's just like a blueprint and is probably 36" x 24" - very easy to read.

I'm not against getting out there and measuring. At the corner of where I need to find, the static bearing point they used is a pin on the property across the road. I will have to ask permission to see if I can find that pin so I can measure from there. I don't know why they didn't measure from the center of the road at that corner as it is right along the road. Maybe it was too close?
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:55 PM
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The map I have is good and very detailed - it's just like a blueprint and is probably 36" x 24" - very easy to read.
Yes, I have some maps just like that for property I bought, but it's really no help if you don't know where one or two of the stakes are located.

If your county has a "GIS" system, you should be able to pull up a sattelite view with the property lines overlayed, so you can tell where it "should" be based on current visible landmarks

GIS: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geograp...rmation_system
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