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  #21  
Old 02-27-2015, 11:57 PM
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I may go with the multiple types of clover and rape again. Talked to the seed dealer my daughter works for today. He also sells food plot seed, which was what I planted in the pictures I posted.

I told him I was thinking of making a video of the planting and do updates as it grows. Hoping it would do the same as two years ago and be waist high by August. I could also show the plots that are 2 years old to show how good they look after a couple years.

Sounds like he may give me the seed if he can use the video. That is if it turns out decent.

Hopefully we could have some success hunting over it this fall and add that to the video.
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  #22  
Old 02-28-2015, 11:29 AM
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That's smart marketing for the seed dealer!
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  #23  
Old 03-01-2015, 07:49 PM
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Sorry to say I won't have any pictures for a while. I went down today to get my feeder working right. Turns out I had to hit the reset button and everything was fine. Pulled the SD cards from the cameras that were on my feeder and mineral lick.

Went to get the cameras from my buddy's feeder and mineral lick and they were gone. First time in 7 years we're lost anything. I followed tracks and know the place they came through to get to our place. I have a call into the property owner to see who all he let in. My son in law saw a pickup on the side of the road yesterday for over 2 hours. He had a good description of the truck but said he didn't write down the plate number. He did remember the first number, and here each county has a number so we have a pretty good idea of the town where the truck is from. I'm hoping to get names from the landowner. My son in law's father is a county sheriff, so I'm thinking if he has some names he has the ability to see if any of those names have a truck registered to them that matches the one my son in law saw.

Anyway I pulled the last two cameras so I don't lose them.

Tonight I want to set my camera up in the back yard and go by it after dark to see what it looks like in the dark when it goes off. If does not have a standard flash. If it is not noticeable I may take an old trail camera that no longer works and put it on my feeder. Then place a trail camera covering the trail camera. If they want to steal the bad one, they can have it as long as I get their picture.
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  #24  
Old 03-01-2015, 09:34 PM
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That's a shame - not only trespassing but stealing....

I like your idea of the camera covering the camera. Likely that those same ones won't be back though.....
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  #25  
Old 03-01-2015, 11:48 PM
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First off I would like to say I know not what I'm talking about because I don't have a feeder YET. but I have read and heard on the internet that feeding corn to deer is hard on their digestive systems especially during the winter. Has any heard this before and could there be an alternative if this is true .
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  #26  
Old 03-02-2015, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
I like your idea of the camera covering the camera. Likely that those same ones won't be back though..
He'll be back because he won't think anyone can connect it to him. Most people check their trail cameras maybe once a month, so as far as he was concerned I may not find them gone for weeks, and no way to connect them to his truck parked on the road. But in my case I checked them within 24 hours any my son in law saw the truck. I figure he also has at one time asked permission to go on the neighbors ground. Without permission to go on the neighbors ground it would take a lot of guts to walk all the way down to the river from the road if trespassing. But once at the river, it's easy to slip over to our ground and no one would know unless they just happened to be there.

Quote:
First off I would like to say I know not what I'm talking about because I don't have a feeder YET. but I have read and heard on the internet that feeding corn to deer is hard on their digestive systems especially during the winter. Has any heard this before and could there be an alternative if this is true .
Many feeders I see run all year and with corn. We've done feeders for the past 7 years. In corn country deer eat corn all the time. I'm not sure why this time of year would be worse for them then any of the other time they are eating corn. If they can eat corn in Nov I'm not why corn in Feb would be bad for them.

But if anyone has any info I'd be more then willing to read up on it.
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  #27  
Old 03-08-2015, 06:40 PM
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Well the deer found the first feeder, so now they are visiting both of them.

Looks like we may add a new feeder near our food plots. I made the mistake of going into Wal Mart last week. They had a 5 gallon bucket feeder with the motor control unit on the bottom on final closeout. Normally $45, I got it for $13. They also had just the motor control unit which is normally $44 marked down to $11. I bought both. We figure we can mount the motor control unit on the bottom of a 30 gallon barrel and just attach some legs to it.

Here's a picture from the first feeder. As you can see it's a little farther away, and about 15 feet up in a tree. The tree on the left has an old camera attached to it just in case they come back and want another one.



I also updated my stand locations on Google earth.



Edited to add

For perspective the white square at the far right of the picture is my daughter and son in laws barn. My house is just to the left of that 100 yards. I'm close to the neighbors trees so my house is harder to see. The day my cameras were taken the pickup we saw was parked a little above the number 3 on the road. From there down to the trees is about a 1/4 mile.
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  #28  
Old 03-08-2015, 07:08 PM
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Quote:
Edited to add
You might want to edit to subtract the LAT/LONG coordinates from that image

It's a shame one can't have things that are safe from theives

I"ve lost some tree stands to them
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  #29  
Old 03-08-2015, 09:53 PM
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Yeah thought of that later, have to see what I can do about that.

Fixed it, thanks for reminding me.
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  #30  
Old 03-12-2015, 02:51 AM
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Every time I see you post the sat pics of your hunting area, I drool.

The area looks like a perfect spot for deer to "escape" from the surrounding agricultural areas.
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  #31  
Old 03-12-2015, 03:26 AM
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Quote:
The area looks like a perfect spot for deer to "escape" from the surrounding agricultural areas.
Deer seldom have any reason to "escape" agricultural areas, since they tend to thrive on most crops

An "agricultural area" is just a gigantic food plot to a deer
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  #32  
Old 03-12-2015, 11:18 AM
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I've been hunting this piece of ground for about 8 years now. The total area inside that bend in the river is about 300 acres. The area from where we hunt back up to the top of the bluff that is wooded is probably around 150 acres, and this neighbor lets no one on that ground, so no other hunters there.

The ground we hunt has changed so much in the last 8 years. The year I started hunting there was right after it had been logged off. It's almost all cottonwood, and the larger trees had been taken off for pallets. It was almost park like with a scattering of trees and lots of grass. The area where we have the stands today was still thicker with a mixture of cottonwood, maple, and elm.

The change occurred in the open area that was logged. Here once the sun got in the brush started growing. 8 years ago you could have shot a deer 150 yards away, today in most places you'd be lucky to see one at 50 yards. And if you're in the area of the cedar thickets, you won't see 20 yards.

But it is this brush that holds deer in the winter when all the crops are out and hiding cover is once again limited by the season. The cedar thickets were used quite a bit this winter when the wind chills were so bad.
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  #33  
Old 03-13-2015, 10:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Deer seldom have any reason to "escape" agricultural areas, since they tend to thrive on most crops

An "agricultural area" is just a gigantic food plot to a deer
There's a lot of agricultural land down in southern MN where I used to hunt. The deer were regularly pushed out of the agricultural areas during harvests, once harvests were complete there is no cover for them, then when hunters are pushing the edges of field and cover they head to heavier cover. Along with bedding there.

So, I pretty much stand by my statement - based on my successful hunting experiences through the years.
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  #34  
Old 03-14-2015, 01:11 AM
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I guess my experience has been deer will only use the edges of crop land as feed... And to pick up feed residue after harvest... Not very far into the fields unless pushed off the edges of the field...

Only using fields, usually corn, as cover when it is high enough.. They tend to shortcut through the corn and feed near the edges of the fields..

Interesting looking plot to hunt... Keep a sweaty T shirt in your stand locations occasionally... With your feeders, food plots, and spending a lot of time in those woods, you should do good...

Good luck...
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  #35  
Old 03-14-2015, 05:18 AM
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I guess my experience has been deer will only use the edges of crop land as feed... And to pick up feed residue after harvest... Not very far into the fields unless pushed off the edges of the field...
I've seen them walk across fields 100 acres or more with no pressure, and at all hours of the day.

They seldom bed far from the edges of fields unless they are pushed by people or dogs, and will generally return to the same areas within 24 hours

There is hardly anywhere in a field around here that won't have tracks from deer or bears
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  #36  
Old 03-14-2015, 11:50 AM
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It's interesting how in other parts of the country deer habits can be different. Before we started hunting the woods where we hunt now we hunted in the corn or bean field, it depended what was planted that year, near my house. Every evening the deer would come up the bluff from the river bottom, cross the gravel road and work their way across the fields feeding as they went. In the morning it would be the reverse.

We'd watch wave after wave to deer move through the picked field. They would come across in groups of 5 to 10, all heading to other fields farther away so they could feed during the night. They would start crossing the field right around sundown, so there was really only about 30 minutes for taking a deer.

The first year we sat behind the snow fence we'd set up along the driveway. We attached a piece of plywood to a post and the fence, then set a couple folding chairs behind the plywood. Get out there 15 or 20 minutes before sundown and it would be all over in 45 minutes. Deer still crossed the road after that, but legal shooting was done. I suppose this was more shooting then hunting, but it did put venison in the freezer. You could drive up and down the roads near the rivers around here after harvest and see groups of 50 or even 100 deer out in the harvested fields eating.

Here the deer spread out come summer when there is more cover in the fields. Some deer may end up 4 or 5 miles from the river bottom sticking by some little creek or pond because the adjoining fields give them enough cover until harvest comes again. Here because I am so close to the river I see deer cross the road in the evening the same way all year. Though in the summer it's just a family unit or two together not a herd of 8 or 10 deer.
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  #37  
Old 03-15-2015, 06:38 PM
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If you have feral hogs in your area, the comment about staking & anchoring the legs to your feeder was some very good advice. The hogs here will push and rub on the legs until the feeder comes crashing down, if the legs are not staked & anchored.

I have some 55 gallon plastic barrels cut lengthwise (made into mainly a salt trough, although others things wind up there too) and fitted with legs with a roof overhead to help keep rain out of the trough. The first two I used 4X4X8 foot treated timbers for the legs. The legs are in the ground 3 feet or more and the hogs could not move them so they lay down and began chewing on the timbers. They managed to chew one leg to the point it no longer had any sharp outside corners, but it was still structurally sound. I took 1X4's and cut to fit from the bottom of the barrel to just below the surface of the ground. I drilled holes at all different angles and then drove an assortment of 10, 12 & 16 common nails through the drilled holes and took my cordless drill and attached the 1X4 boards with the nails extended outwards on to the three exposed sides of the 4X4 treated timbers. That ended the hogs chewing on the treated timbers.

Later, I used the heavy wall galvanized conduit for legs, to eliminate the hogs chewing problem. Hogs don't stay in my area all the time, but when they are there, they create havoc for anyone not prepared for their malace.

I would hate to see your nice feeders laying on the ground all bent up from a herd of devilish hogs.

I despise a thief, but never leave my cameras out when I am not at the hunting property. I keep a lock on the timer compartment where the electronic brain is stored for the feed times and length of dispensing, because I had someone re-program my feeder to suite their hunting times the first year I installed the feeder.

I live 2.5 hours away from the hunting property and all the neighbors around the hunting property know when I am there and not there. The next door neighbor was a great guy and watched over thing for me, until he and his wife went their separate ways. A few of the others I try and get along with, but I don't really trust them. Just some of the perils of living a considerable distance from where one hunts.
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  #38  
Old 03-25-2015, 07:17 PM
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Well last week I set up our homemade feeder. It may not look as nice as the store bought, but for $11 for the controls, a barrel my hunting buddy made some modifications to, a trash can lid, and some 1" conduit for legs, it appears the deer don't mind.

That deer on the right that seems to be sniffing something. That is my decoy camera mounted to a steel post.

This feeder is set on the side of a food plot, so some of that green you see is the clover starting to green up.

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  #39  
Old 03-25-2015, 08:05 PM
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That deer on the right that seems to be sniffing something.
That is my decoy camera mounted to a steel post.
Maybe it's trying to post a "selfie" on Facebook
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  #40  
Old 03-25-2015, 08:46 PM
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Glad to see your real camera is still there.

Hey - I like the homemade feeder - seems to fit in with the surroundings just right.

Thanks for the update!
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