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Wild/Feral/Nuisance/Control Please...no posts about Barney, Kermit, Miss Piggie, etc.

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  #1  
Old 02-28-2015, 06:17 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Default Wolf in the driveway

My wife found a solitary wolf in the driveway last night when she came home. She called the neighbors and they saw it as well. That would be a new one for us. We have moose, bears, foxes, and numerous other critters, but we have never had a wolf on the property. It might have been a wolf hybrid, but those are illegal in Alaska, but we have wolf packs in the area. We'll have to keep our eyes peeled. We don't have large livestock any more, but we have poultry and a dog that goes out after dark. Dogs seem to be the wolves' favorite food when food is scarce. Hopefully, it was just a solitary male wandering through, and we won't have to worry about it hanging around. Most of the time, the bears we see pass through without damaging anything.
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Old 03-01-2015, 12:38 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Cool sighting.

I guess everyone has to make a living and support their families. Probably harder for the wolves to do since there are so many of us (over populating humans) taking their space and their food.

Hope he moves along, for his sake.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:18 AM
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You're correct that wildlife only tends to be trouble when their natural food is scarce.

Wisc. re-introduced wolves several yrs ago and they've done quite well for themselves. Hunts were allowed the past two years to keep the population in check, but now some Nannycrat judge in Boston has declared the hunt illegal. If an appeals court doesn't rectify that misguided decision, we'll be having some real problems in the near future as the growing wolf population starves as it exceeds the carrying capacity of the natural environment .
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Old 03-01-2015, 12:39 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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A couple things.... This is the hardest part of winter for most wildlife.. For a carnivore predator likely the worst... If it is reduced to hunting road kill and family pets, be sure somewhere in the neighborhood there will be an incident of one kind or another....

I can tell you about the wolf here in WI.... From what every they transplanted they have multiplied into more than 4 times the numbers the "experts" figured the state could support... This number is AFTER about 1/5 the expected maximum population was harvested in the last couple seasons on them... How can you expect to support 4 times the population your habitat is deemed capable of handling ??? Could you manage and support 4 families in your single family home ??? ...

But the people who are pushing all this don't have to deal with the consequences of these animals doing what they do... They just want to see one or more from the car when they go out into the country 2-3 times a year... If a wolf does go to the suburb and gobble up there little "Fluffy" you can imagine the level of outrage at that...

My 2 cents....
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Old 03-01-2015, 05:44 PM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Wyobuckaroo,

Who are the wolves' predators...besides us?

Wouldn't they keep the population in check - naturally?
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:35 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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We haven't seen the wolf again, so I assume "he" has moved on. We have lots of wolves up here, and the natural control is starvation. The wolf population increases until the game is depleted, then the majority of the population dies of starvation and the birth rate plummets.
The game population slowly recovers and the wolf population follows. Smaller numbers of wolves can survive for a while on mice and rabbits, but wolf packs don't form to prey on mice--a misconception left by "Never Cry Wolf".
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:38 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Don - do you have trail cams? If so, you may want to set up a few if you haven't done so already. It might give you an idea if the wolf is a regular visitor.

We have wolves moving through our property on a regular basis (yote too). We keep our dogs very close at night, as dogs that roam have a tendency to disappear.
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:49 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Nope, I don't have any trail cams, but it might be worth getting, as much for human trespassers as for the game. The only livestock we still have are poultry, and he didn't bother them. We did have 2 farm cats that haven't been seen the the wolf sighting, so he may have gotten them. Where is the best place to get the cameras--someplace like Cabelas? My neighbor (4 miles away) put out cameras and discovered he had grizzly bears crossing his property on a regular basis and he never knew.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:37 PM
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In the lower 48 there was a reason wolfs were mostly eradicated. Now that a few states have re-introduces them, Washington Idaho etc; etc; The local elk, deer, sheep, goats herds have been declining. And what has already been said before, it's because the limp wristed environmentalists that live in the cities want a place to see them just not in their neighborhoods. We practice the Shoot, shut up method. I would like to see the carcasses shipped to the sierra club headquarters so they can see them up close.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:48 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
Wyobuckaroo,

Who are the wolves' predators...besides us?

Wouldn't they keep the population in check - naturally?
===
That is the problem.... The wolf reintroduced has no predators here... In the Rocky Mtns, that may have been the grizzly at one time... But not in WI for instance.... I'm going to think a black bear is not a danger to a wolf.. And a group of wolves is a danger to a bear... As bears seem to have a much more solitary life style...

Wouldn't they (wolves ?) keep the population (deer, turkeys what else ?) in check - naturally ?....... Again... Maybe in the Rocky Mtns where the wolf, prey ratio is a LOT different, than for instance WI.. And the square miles of range available per wolf is SUBSTANTIALLY more so than in, for instance WI again...

I'm going to guess the conflict of man and wolf started in late 1492 or early 1493 and started when the first settlers moved west out of site of Plymouth Rock.... At least with the European settlers...

And don't let what people suspect is history fool you.... The North American Native peoples had what seemed to be a different relation with the wolf... But I can assure you they did NOT have much tolerance for the wolf near where they lived... The legend may have been the bear and wolf were there "brothers" but not next door...

Many people are shocked and saddened to find out wildlife biology is not as pretty or romantic as it seems..

Take care
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Old 03-02-2015, 12:18 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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Wyobuckaroo,

I meant if the wolves had natural predators (in the wild) would they keep the wolves in check. (It didn't come out the way I meant it).

I wonder who is mankind's predator? (Since we are over populous).
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Old 03-02-2015, 02:59 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
I wonder who is mankind's predator? (Since we are over populous).
Mankind.
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Old 03-02-2015, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post
Wyobuckaroo,

I meant if the wolves had natural predators (in the wild) would they keep the wolves in check. (It didn't come out the way I meant it).
---
Disease and starvation, or a combo of both as the food supply dictates.. Again, wildlife biology isn't pretty or romantic, or if you were to graph the numbers not a nice smooth curve of ups and downs... And the time line that Mother Nature does this in isn't to most humans liking... This is because as humans we tend to compare to our own personal time lines...
=====
I wonder who is mankind's predator? (Since we are over populous).
---
Population according to resources of the habitat.. Disease, starvation etc.... Again the laws of biology.... This seems the ultimate "not pretty" issue since we individually could be one of the active participants...

Mankind being the worst enemy of mankind.... Very true, but a whole other thread it seems to me...
My 2 cents..
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Old 03-02-2015, 08:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by connie189 View Post

...we are over populous).
We could argue that point:

- all 7 billion of us could tread water at the same time in Lake Superior (except for me. I can't tread water.)

-Fifty percent of the world's population lives within 50 miles of an ocean. That leaves one heckuvalot of room for the other 50%.

-I challenge anybody to name a natural resource that is actually in danger of being depleted by human activity. Fresh water is the only one that even comes close, but that's not because of lack of total supply, but because of inconvenient distribution.
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Old 03-03-2015, 01:07 AM
connie189 Female connie189 is offline
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How did you come to the estimation of 7 billion people being able to tread water (except for you) in Lake Superior? Does that calculation account for on-going deaths and births at any given moment? Also, the amount of "junk" that people accumulate that affects the environment generated just by their being alive... Also, let's count the burials and space that the 7 billion people might take up (unless cremated), etc., etc. And the toxic chemicals that everyone uses during their lifetimes (and in the thereafter).

Was that "fresh and untainted" water, or polluted water that isn't in short supply?
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:25 AM
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Area of L.Superior = 883.7 billion sq ft; allowing 5x5 = 25 sq ft for each swimmer, we could actually put 126x the world's population in there at one time.

Carrying capacity is the limit of the population that the environment can support. It's determined by things like food supply, water, air, space, intrinsic birth & death rate, competing species (predators, disease) etc.

Space, food, air and water are not limiting factors for the human population.

I was worried about food production, given that food production adequate to feed 7 billion people is basically the process of turning petroleum into food. As of 2005, the world's oil reserves were estimated to become depleted in 20-100 yrs (the Saudis are terribly secretive about the size of their reserves).

But then, along came that nasty old fracking thing. We now have estimated NG reserves that will last 6 centuries. I can only think so far into the future. Let someone else worry about it after that.

I personally think job availability is the liming factor for humans. We already see stagnant (even falling) population growth among the industrialized nations, powered mainly by economic & quality of life issues.

Careful. It's a jungle out there.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:56 AM
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Germany is also having problems with wolves moving into more populated districts:
http://www.welt.de/videos/article138...-bekommen.html
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