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Water Drinking water, wells, ponds, saving, purifying, etc.

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Old 04-10-2015, 10:56 PM
RochBear Male RochBear is offline
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Default How to dig a well, with post hole digger?

hi Everyone,

Last year I dug a well, with a post hole digger (auger style). We had to have 35 feet of pipe on it, but we were in pure white sand for the all but the top 18 inches.
Here's my problem. Once we hit water, we could no longer dig any deeper. The wet sand kept flowing into the hole. So I dropped in a 4 inch PVC pipe for a casing. But I only have about 1 inch of water at the bottom of the casing. How do I Extend this well deeper?

Here is my thought. Since water is down 32 feet, I am going to need a cylinder, to lift the water. I would like to drive a sand point (1.25 inch) down about 8 feet, with the cylinder on top of that. Has anyone ever done that? Am I going to have problems damaging the cylinder while driving a sand point?

I really appreciate any assistance.

This well will be to water our garden. The house well is 360 feet, and that is our drinking water.

Some other information. That post hole digger was very unwieldy pulling it up, when we had 35 feet of 3/4 inch pipe on it. The last 10 feet, we used a Well Jack, to hold the pipe. We would pull it up 20 feet, clamp it, and unscrew the top 20 feet, then lift out the last 15 feet. It was SLOW going. But there were 4 of us, and we had the time.

One trick we used to guess the depth of the water, was to use Google Earth, since it tells you the elevation. We knew there was a small lake about 1/2 mile away, and google Earth told us the elevation difference was 30 feet. This might help someone else.

Thanks

RochBear.
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:12 PM
Bones Bones is offline
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Maybe something like they show in the video would help drill it a little farther. He has some other videos that shows finishing it and improving it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGq0ETzZP0E
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Old 04-12-2015, 10:51 AM
doc doc is offline
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Maybe it's too early in the day for me to be thinking clearly, BUT: one would presume that the guy in the video is drilling a well because he needs a source of water....so, where does the water he's using to drill the well come from? Maybe he doesn't need that well after all?
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:24 AM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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sounds like a sand point well would be a better fit than an auger. my advice would be to drive a sand point well down the center of the cased auger well. getting to the water line first will have saved you a lot of work driving the point, so you will probably only need to drive it another 15 or 20 feet and have the well pipe run down the casing from the earlier well.

i tried doin something similar, my sand point kept hitting rocks at 6 feet, then i used an auger (hand powered, wit a cross bar) to find a spot to go to 8 feet, was going to put a filter on the end of a 10 foot pipe and use a 12 foot well case, but needed an auger hole 10 feet down, i never got it that deep before hitting a rock. so i gave up after about 30 tries and just dug a 6 foot pit out in the swamp and lined the top with a barrel to prevent it from collapsing in (bottom of the barrel was removed) i just dip a bucket down on a rope. this is my only water supply besides rain barrels, melting snow or walking down to the creek 1/2 mile away
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Old 04-12-2015, 03:03 PM
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Bearfootfarm Male Bearfootfarm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
Maybe it's too early in the day for me to be thinking clearly, BUT: one would presume that the guy in the video is drilling a well because he needs a source of water....so, where does the water he's using to drill the well come from? Maybe he doesn't need that well after all?
I've seen it done with barrels of water, since a lot of it returns to the surface up the pipes.

Watching the type of soil particles flushed out can be an indication of when you've hit water

It doesn't require volume so much as high pressure

Around here many just drive them in, since it's largely sand and water can usually be found at around 25 ft for general use

Most wells for drinking water go over 100' to make sure it's clean
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Old 04-13-2015, 02:41 PM
Bones Bones is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
Maybe it's too early in the day for me to be thinking clearly, BUT: one would presume that the guy in the video is drilling a well because he needs a source of water....so, where does the water he's using to drill the well come from? Maybe he doesn't need that well after all?
I have water at my place but it is a utility. Now the water company is about three miles away as the crow flies. I live in the county I want to drill my own well and tell the utility company to take a hike or at least cut down on my bill from watering the garden.

So I would use that water pressure to drill my own well.
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