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Wild/Feral/Nuisance/Control Please...no posts about Barney, Kermit, Miss Piggie, etc.

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Old 04-22-2015, 02:35 AM
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Default Rabies in Coyotes in New Jersey????

One Coyotes test positive for Rabies in New Jersey. Man walking dog attacked and bitten by Coyote, police car attacked by Coyote. Abnormal behavior for Coyotes.

Indications are a Rabies outbreak may be developing in the Coyote population there.
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Old 04-22-2015, 03:25 AM
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I'd be far more surprised to hear they didn't find Rabies in NJ.

It's a pretty common disease among Coons , Fox, and Coyotes
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:01 AM
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Agreed - while not commonplace it's not unheard of around here either - especially in raccoon and skunks.
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Old 04-22-2015, 02:44 PM
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Skunks & bats should all be considered rabid until proven otherwise. It's endemic in those populations. Racoons are a close second. All mammals are susceptible to contacting rabies.

Unusual behavior, like nocturnal animals appearing during daylight hours, can be a tip-off of rabies. The classic "foaming at the mouth" is a late manifestation seen when the animal's throat muscles are finally paralyzed and it can't swallow its own saliva. The end is near then. Any of its body fluids will contain the virus and contact with them should be avoided.
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Old 04-22-2015, 02:45 PM
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If the article I read is the same as the one Jjr is referring to.. The place this happened is about 1/2" north of NY city on the map... Not unusual to see yotes in populated places occasionally... But there seems to be an unusually large population there...

I suppose that makes sense as that is where the food supplies of all kinds would be... And a larger population of animals would equal a larger number with sickness...

I suppose with the numbers of people there, it will likely be hard and costly to do control methods there...

The only thing that seems to have been said/done so far is warnings to keep pets and children inside... Not just supervised, but indoors...

Good luck...
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Old 04-22-2015, 07:46 PM
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I suppose that makes sense as that is where the food supplies of all kinds would be... And a larger population of animals would equal a larger number with sickness...
Yup - plentiful food supply with no hunting allowed - their numbers will grow.

Pennsylvania's rule for coyote hunting is pretty good.

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COYOTES: No closed season. Unlimited. Outside of any big game season (deer, bear, elk and turkey), coyotes may be taken with a hunting license or a furtaker license, and without wearing orange. During any big game season, coyotes may be taken while lawfully hunting big game or with a furtaker license.
One of our local sportsmen's clubs even has a coyote hunt with some pretty nice payouts. This year there wasn't a big turnout since it was so bitterly cold (February).

Scroll down a little to see the results from this years hung:

http://sinnemahoning-sportsmen.org/wordpress/
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Old 05-09-2015, 04:29 PM
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I would think the state and USDA would both be distributing rabies vaccination baits throughout the involved area in addition to other control measures to eliminate or control the outbreak as quickly as possible.

The vaccine laced baits seem to have worked great in Europe and where they have been used here in the US.
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Old 05-09-2015, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Jjr View Post
One Coyotes test positive for Rabies in New Jersey. Man walking dog attacked and bitten by Coyote, police car attacked by Coyote. Abnormal behavior for Coyotes.

Indications are a Rabies outbreak may be developing in the Coyote population there.
A horse on an Amish farm in the next county over was rabid, above the fold in the paper
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:14 PM
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Equine & cattle rarely ever contract Rabies, but any warm blooded animal is susceptible to contracting Rabies.

When I was a youth, dogs were the domestic animal most often infected with Rabies, because of turf fights with intruders, where as cats would flee the intruders. Now it is the exact opposite. Because of leash laws and dogs being kept behind fences, it is cats that most often contract rabies, because their climbing ability often leaves them with less protection and creates greater vulnerability for them. At least that is the case in this state.
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:40 PM
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The vaccine laced baits seem to have worked great in Europe and where they have been used here in the US.
===
What reading I have done about this says it takes a minimum of 250 baits per square mile... And this is supposed to have resulted in 60% of animals in that area successfully treated... I presume that is in that particular square mile....

Now, I don't know what those square miles treated were... Rural residential, rural farm, urban, suburban, city, metro, etc... It was also said that treatment rate was sufficient to take care of the disease problem in that area... The article didn't say where this was...

At the time the info I got was written, the vaccine was $1.50 a dose... So that is $375 or so per square mile...... I got to think $ is a big part of the decision of how/when/where to treat......

Take care...
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Old 05-09-2015, 11:36 PM
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Cost is always a factor and using the treated bait simply as a preventative procedure, cost may may become a determining factor, but during an outbreak of the disease, attacking the outbreak on all fronts, especially in an urban area will most likely, reduce the number of potential victims and very probably be the cheapest solution in the end. Those Rabies vaccinations for someone coming in contact with an infected animal, or one acting out of its normal parameters, is not cheap either.

Let me digress: The oldest daughter while in college, came in late one night after the cafeteria had finished serving supper, so she went to the student union and got a drink, burger & fries. It was spring and pleasant out, so she went out on the terrace where tables and chairs were also available for dinning, discussions, debates, studying or just plain visiting. A squirrel jumped up on the table and bit her hand while wrestling with her for the burger, before running off with the meat patty. Animal control wanted to know if she could identify the squirrel. Her reply was, "Sure he is the one with yellow lips, because I like mustard on my burgers!"

I have always believed the squirrel was accustomed to hand outs from the other students, and the daughter had not noticed him patiently waiting for a tid-bit of food, so he took matters into his on paws.

But as the doctor said, that was not normal behavior for a squirrel, so the only safe decision is to take a preventative course of Rabies Vaccination treatments. Being a Veterinary student she got her Rabies Vaccinations a year sooner than most of her classmates, and under the circumstances, our insurance paid for the treatments rather than us, so it was a blessing in disguise.

The Rabies treatments today are a far cry from the old methods of 21 shots in the abdomen and how the new treatments compare cost wise with the older series of shots (vaccinations) adjusted for inflation, I have no idea, but I strongly suspect the new treatments will be much more expensive than the old treatments when adjust for inflation, but still just a guess.
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:38 PM
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I live about an hour away from the area you're talking about and I can tell you that the yotes are running rampant in NJ. I see them regularly about dusk. Sometimes even trotting along the side of the road. Many of them are losing their fear of humans which is also leading to more sightings in the more populated areas. Without any large predators and many smaller animals to hunt, including livestock and pets, NJ is an all you can eat buffet for these critters. We need more eradication to remove the overpopulation, not just bait to prevent rabies.

When there is no overpopulation problem, you hardly ever see them. Like any other animal, their numbers are cyclical, dependent on local food sources. We've seen the on our place, but haven't lost any animals to them yet. Of course, we do lock our chickens in at night. And we don't leave any animal feed/pet food outside either.
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Old 05-12-2015, 01:16 AM
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I fully agree and completely understand you CountryMom22, and you make a very valid point; but there is a big difference in controlling and eliminating the threat of a disease in a carrier population over elimination of the species itself.

Eliminating the species will certainly help eliminate & control the disease threat, which is the greater of the problems at hand, but it will unlikely be 100% successful.

I don't know what your population demographics are, but those coyo-demons are everywhere. And they are smart too! We have them here where we live. It was semi-rural when we move here 30+ years ago, but it is clearly an urban setting today, after being classified the fastest growing city in the state two years in a row. We can hear them, probably 250+ nights out of the year. Actually it's a rare night we don't hear them. When we are in the country we hear them there too.

Poisoning kills a few, trapping collects a few, hunters bag a few, and the occasional vehicle removes the odd coyote now and again, but like the fictitious "Borg" the coyotes learn and adapt quickly, which makes them a formidable foe.

Every coyote could be eliminated and it would not hurt my feeling none. In addition to small domestic pets, fowl and livestock they molest, they also kill considerable numbers of game animals. And with a disease outbreak in their population like Rabies, they are more dangerous than normal. So they are vermin plain and simple, and should be eradicated, I agree wholeheartedly. But I know a few bleeding hears that believe Rattle Snakes should be relocated rather than being killed, but that rarely happens in my neck of the woods. (Now if they could remember the homeowner, I might not mind having a few Rattlers around to discourage trespassers, but I am afraid they won't remember and distinguish between me and the trespassers.)

We have drifted much in our discussion, but the Rabies problem in the coyote population, might be just the ticket to convince the general population of the need to eliminate or severely reduce the coyote population in your area.
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Old 05-12-2015, 01:04 PM
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The squirrel with yellow mustard lips.... Now that is funny, in a serious situation.... Yes.... That animal was used to handouts, and took things into its own paws...

But it makes me think.... Years ago when I was young and had livestock out west.... Coyotes were always a "problem"... And what Jjr said is a good example of this trend.... That is coyotes moving to areas of more/better opportunities to live... That being urban, suburban areas... And being capable of easily and quickly adapting to these areas...

So it stands to reason the most effective and efficient methods of controlling them will have to be equally resourceful..... It WILL NOT be an easy, necessarily cheap, or fast thing to handle....

Good luck...
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:29 PM
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Coyotes dying of rabies don't bother me. Vaccinate your pets and steer clear of any strange acting wildlife.
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Jjr View Post
....the Rabies problem in the coyote population, might be just the ticket to convince the general population of the need to eliminate or severely reduce the coyote population in your area.
Be careful of what you wish for. ...There was a Medieval Al Gore who noted that villages with the most dogs & cats also had the most Black Death. He convinced the authorities that they should kill off the dogs & cats, which they did. The Plague got worse in those towns.

As CountryMom noted above, populations fluctuate naturally. They do so because predator/prey populations are interdependent, of course. If we eliminate coyotes to solve some borderline inconveniences, we may see more devastating problems increase as rodent populations rise.

Everything in moderation seems to be a wise policy.
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:15 AM
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If we eliminate coyotes to solve some borderline inconveniences, we may see more devastating problems increase as rodent populations rise.
Many places having problems aren't native habitat for Coyotes.

They are "imports", much like the Red Fox, that are expanding into areas where they never were before
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:09 AM
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Many places having problems aren't native habitat for Coyotes.

They are "imports", much like the Red Fox, that are expanding into areas where they never were before
Yes the wolves kept them out of the east until they were killed off. But I don't want wolves here either.
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