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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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  #1  
Old 05-11-2015, 10:17 AM
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Default BrushHog Drive Shaft Problem

I finally picked up the used KingKutter rotary mower I bought with that Case 885. When I went to hook it up, I realized the drive shaft didn't slide to allow connection to the PTO. It's stuck in a position just the right length for operation. It also doesn't have the protective cover surrounding the shaft and the tractor side universal. (The mower side cover is there.)

Three questions: [a] how important is that protector, [2] how easily should that shaft telescope longer/shorter, and [c] given a replacement price of $260 + shipping (1/2 the price paid for the whole unit), should I take a torch & sledge hammer to it to free it up?
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:30 AM
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The protector sleeve is a safety item only - does not effect the operation at all. It's there so you don't get the tail of your shirt, shirt sleeve, or anything like that getting caught in the shaft while it is spinning.

Your drive shaft needs to come apart and be greased. Drive shafts are 2 piece with on piece sliding into the other. Not only is the sliding action needed to install the shaft it is also important to be able to slide in and out during operation as the brush hog moves up and down over the terrain.

You'll need to somehow get the shaft apart - it is likely just rusted. Once loosened up it will slide completely apart. A couple of good soaks with some penetrating oil and start working on sliding the shaft back and forth until you can get it apart. Once apart the inner shaft needs to be greased well. There should be a grease fitting on the outer shaft somewhere to keep grease in there.

Here's a cut out view of the inner and outer shafts together:



Here's a pic of just the outer shaft after the inner was removed:



The 2 pieces apart:

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Old 05-11-2015, 01:33 PM
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Doc, Coaltrain gave you very sound advice.

Not a lot anyone can add, but as far as separating the drive shaft, I would use penetrating oil on the shaft, attach the cutter to something solid and take a cable puller, attaching it to the open end of the drive shaft and work at pulling the two sections apart.

Heat and gentle tapping on things does work in some cases, but personally I hate to see anyone take a sledge hammer to equipment.

One other option: The shaft should detach at the gear box end on the cutter too. It it will slip free, you can place the entire shaft in a container and cover with diesel. Given some time in the diesel, the shafts will probably separate easily. If you don't have anything readily available to hold the shaft, a six inch diameter PVC Pipe capped on one end will hold the shaft and diesel.

A little time and patient working with the shaft should have it properly working in short order.
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Old 05-11-2015, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjr View Post

I hate to see anyone take a sledge hammer to equipment.

.
Having done considerable work on Ferrari, Lamborghini, Jaguar, etc in a past life, I learned long ago never to force delicate parts. If it won't go, get a bigger hammer.

Thanks, guys, for confirming what I suspected. So far oil and a propane torch has't loosened it up at all. Next I'll try the soak, then acetylene with a mechanized tug.
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Old 05-12-2015, 03:16 PM
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Chain one end of the PTO shaft to a sturdy tree. Chain the other end of the PTO shaft to your tractor. Drive the tractor away from the tree. If it doesn't pull apart, with some tension on it, hit the slip yoke with a hammer and apply heat with a torch.
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Old 05-12-2015, 03:54 PM
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Not sure why or what is in it. But when stuck parts did not want to move no matter what I put sprayed or soaked on it Marvel Mystery Oil always seemed to work
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Old 05-12-2015, 11:25 PM
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Problem solved. I chained the tractor side universal to the tractor and the deck to my Tahoe. It wouldn't budge at idle with the Tahoe in reverse, but I got brave and gave it a little goose. It popped free.

I think the outer tube may have narrowed on its inside diameter and hung the inner tube up when the shaft was contracted to its shortest length. Measurements showed it should have another 3 or 4 in. of travel. Once apart, I could see it was well lubricated and not rusted.

I had to saw 5 in. off the outer shaft and 3 in from the inner to get it to match up to my tractor. The unit had apparently been used with a larger tractor/ longer 3-pt arms and not the one I bought.
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Old 05-13-2015, 11:29 AM
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Glad you got it sorted Doc. Yeah - it sounds like exactly what you said - shaft was forced inward too far. Glad you have it cut down to the proper size for your use - very important when running a brush hog that the shaft isn't too long and won't let the rear of the mower float.
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Old 05-13-2015, 04:52 PM
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You need to keep that shaft well greased. I do the universals each time I cut and the shaft at least twice a year. The plastic covers are fairly cheap and besides safety it will help keep grass and weeds from fouling the shaft.

Not sure of the PTO setup/transmission on the Case, but some tractors need an over-running coupler for PTO implements. For example the N-series Ford Fergusons
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Old 05-13-2015, 04:59 PM
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Glad it's apart. As stated above it needs to slide in and out freely while going up and down and over dips and such. I have seen several Ford tractors that a tight pto shaft will pull the tractor pto shaft out dumping all the oil. It can and does happen to all tractors, I just see more fords.
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Old 05-13-2015, 05:32 PM
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What sort of Fords you work on?

I've a 9N and 3-cyl 2000. The N runs great but I'm just sorting out ethanol problems with the 2000. Need to install a new petcock/filter in the tank, and the rebuilt carb.

The 2000 is more tractor but the simplicity and reliability of the N makes it a keeper. I can fix any problem with the tools in the small toolbox right out in the field, and it runs all day on not much gas, any gas
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:28 AM
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The folks I bought the Case from also have a '48 (?) 9N for sale. It's running and functional, but could use a cosmetic make-over, if anyone's interested-- asking $1500.

MadProf: good idea. At only ~$50, an overruning coupler is pretty cheap insurance.

Last edited by doc; 05-14-2015 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
The folks I bought the Case from also have a '48 (?) 9N for sale. It's running and functional, but could use a cosmetic make-over, if anyone's interested-- asking $1500.

MadProf: good idea. At only ~$50, an overruning coupler is pretty cheap insurance.
A 48 would be an 8N with a 4 speed. The earlier 9 (1939) and 2N (1942) had 3 speeds and were nearly identical. A lot of them are Frankentractors made up from several parts donors though. Besides the 4 speed the 8N also had a different steering system.

$1500 would not be too bad if it's functional with good tires.

I paid $1000 for mine 25 years ago, it came with tire chains, backblade, 2-bottom plow, spring tooth harrow, and a scoop for the 3-pt hitch. It was a good investment.

Hope you enjoy the Case.I learned to dive tractors on one of my Uncles, good memories.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:31 PM
gandrimp gandrimp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
What sort of Fords you work on?

I suppose the smallest ford tractor I have worked on would be the n style tractors ( 25-30 hp ) , the biggest would be the tw 35 (187 hp). On second thought 1210 (16 hp) was the smallest ford.

All other brands vary in about the same sizes.
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Old 05-17-2015, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
The folks I bought the Case from also have a '48 (?) 9N for sale. It's running and functional, but could use a cosmetic make-over, if anyone's interested-- asking $1500.

MadProf: good idea. At only ~$50, an overruning coupler is pretty cheap insurance.
You shouldn't need one on that tractor

It's only needed on models with a PTO that requires the tractor to be moving in order for it to turn
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Old 05-17-2015, 03:52 PM
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Interesting discussion of ORC: http://www.yesterdaystractors.com/cg...mall&th=823916
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
They are needed on old tractors without a "live pto" like my neighbor's '53 NAA, but adding one to my MF-175 would mean cutting the mower's drive shaft

His tractor needs it so the mower can't push the tractor, but most newer designs don't have that problem, so you just push in the clutch and the tractor stops even if the mower still turns

He also doesn't have the protective cover on the mower shaft, and when cutting really tall weeds or vines, debris will wrap around it and is a PITA to remove
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