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  #1  
Old 05-16-2015, 09:50 PM
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Default History of WI Logging

Quaintly presented history of logging in WI with interviews, photos, footage & demonstrations of old techniques.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McXkG69aL9U
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXy5fzQwgcs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePBnFRP2X_c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sflWiEGPqfY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTxv-ukOdZ0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dvo1FyPhZNk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mX9xwl_5dEs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8GLG00ycXg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y413FFnpt6c
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  #2  
Old 05-18-2015, 10:47 AM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Documentaries like this are very interesting and fun to see...

My rock pile here is near one of the water ways that fed logs to one of the mills mentioned.. Small towns on either side of me have the old steam engines (not boilers, but engines) that ran the local mills in the town parks..

I'm a nut for history, and especially local history.. Plus the history of the machinery that was used...

Thanks for sharing...
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Old 05-19-2015, 06:32 PM
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I thought you might get a kick out of that, Wyo. It amazes me how they got things done in the 19th century without our hi tech stuff. Did you catch the film of them hauling those heavy logs on a horse drown sled down that icey hill? Pretty scarey. How did those horses keep their footing, and why did those goofy drivers even attempt that? And what about climbing on the log jams and freeing up logs by hand? I wonder what the death rate was for that job? Jeez we got an easy life today.
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Old 05-20-2015, 04:17 PM
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Sled skidding logs downhill...... The horses didn't do much, I think... I believe the sleds had a drag brake kind of like a giant version that would be on a dog sled as a brake....

The local steam, old machinery club runs a sawmill at there event every year.. The use one of a couple steam tractors, one being a big Case steamer.. Of course the tractor is my main interest.. Typical locomotive/railroad type boiler scaled to tractor size/use... This saw mill is a pretty big one with about a 4' or bigger blade... They occasionally have logs big enough to make the tractor really huff, puff and chug.... WAY fun event...

As a kid I played on my grand fathers old Case steamer and Rumley parked in the shelter belt line of trees... I don't know how they ever escaped the scrap iron drives of the 1940s....

I routinely sell a thousand $ or more in sports club raffle tickets at the steam/machinery show...

Enjoy
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Old 05-21-2015, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
Documentaries like this are very interesting and fun to see...

My rock pile here is near one of the water ways that fed logs to one of the mills mentioned.. Small towns on either side of me have the old steam engines (not boilers, but engines) that ran the local mills in the town parks..

I'm a nut for history, and especially local history.. Plus the history of the machinery that was used...

Thanks for sharing...
I'm a nut for history too, and my property sits on a river that was a logging river.

I gather as many books written by locals about the settling and logging days. What's fascinating is I often get to meet people from the families that either wrote the books or are major parts of them.

Thanks for those Vids, Doc! Looks just like N MN history ... one of the few things we share with those Chedderheads.
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:10 AM
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I love hearing the stories of those who lived thru the old times.

I can just see myself telling the stories 30 yrs from now of how we roughed it growing up in the 50s: "We only had black & white TV and actually had to turn our whole wrist to dial a rotary phone and we had to heat up our TV dinners in an OVEN for as long as 10 minutes!!"
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