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  #21  
Old 07-28-2015, 03:19 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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I am glad I don't have to choose as well and glad that I don't have to subsist on a single shot shotgun. To me guns are tools, I don't use a crescent wrench for every bolt.
Word. x2
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  #22  
Old 07-28-2015, 11:19 AM
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rice paddy daddy Male rice paddy daddy is offline
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We have a small farm in a rural, wooded area.
My hobby is the study of military history, and as part of that I own a few military surplus rifles. And I like guns of the Old West.
But as for actual backwoods farm guns I keep things simple.
I always have a handgun in my pocket whenever outdoors - either a single action 22 magnum 3" barrel revolver, or a S&W 38 Special.
Long guns: I have a .410 single shot for day time use that I put a sling on so I could carry it and tools at the same time while doing things like fixing fence, etc.
I originally used a 12 ga single shot for night time defense against predators after my chickens, but after I wounded one and it ran off before I could reload I went to a SXS double. A pump won't fill the bill because I hold my Maglight under the forearm with my support hand - can't do that and work a pump also. And besides, if you don't get that predator with two shots he's long gone anyway.
I also keep my Mini 14 leaning against the head of the bed, loaded with a 20 round magazine, 24/7/365.

Keeping things simple is what works for me.
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  #23  
Old 07-29-2015, 12:47 AM
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Originally Posted by rice paddy daddy View Post
I originally used a 12 ga single shot for night time defense against predators after my chickens, but after I wounded one and it ran off before I could reload I went to a SXS double. A pump won't fill the bill because I hold my Maglight under the forearm with my support hand - can't do that and work a pump also. And besides, if you don't get that predator with two shots he's long gone anyway.

Keeping things simple is what works for me.
Pump guns are certainly quality guns and good performers, but they are not for everyone or every situation, as illustrated by RPD.

There is nothing faster, for maneuverability, sighting or that follow up shot,to the average civilian shooter than a double, shotgun or rifle. [If not correct, professional guides would be using something else. But the double rifle has been the main stay of the professional hunting guides for over a century and is still their preferred choice. The few who use something else is probably more a result of the doubles costs than anything else. But to get back to the subject at hand.]

I don't know exactly why, but a double shotgun has always been appealing and my preference. I did not grow up hunting with anyone who used a double, and only knew one person who hunted with a double before I graduated high school. Dad did not like doubles, he said they were heavy and you might as well be carrying two single shots, but that was not, and is not, the way I view things. Considering the magazine tube and extra metal in the receiver area, I doubt there is more than a few ounces difference in weight of a double, verses either a pump or semi-automatic.

Unfortunately so few people use a double shotgun these days, their price is almost in outer space, and a good, quality used one is not much less, so a poor boy like me probably never will own one.
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  #24  
Old 07-29-2015, 01:38 AM
joejeep92 Male joejeep92 is offline
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I've always loved doubles, something about them appeals to me. So far I haven't gotten one because I just can't validate the cost for a good one, the cheaper ones I've read and talked to people about seem to shoot loose at a fairly rapid rate.
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  #25  
Old 07-30-2015, 07:16 PM
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I probably went with the .22LR bolt instead of a semi-auto pick, because I had a Glenfield 60 when growing up that was a habitual jammer. I know the problem with that, but the replacement part was almost as much as picking up a new .22.
With the bolt action rifle (or leaver action for that matter) one can slip a hand over the ejection area and catch the empty brass, so no evidence remains to be discovered by another passing through the same area. This ability afforded by the lever & bolt action rifles is probably not a big selling point, but it could be an advantage under certain circumstances. One might learn the ability to catch ejected brass from a semi-automatic with a small net or with the use of a gloved hand and practice, but it certainly will never be as easy as when using a lever or bolt action.

Both the lever & bolt action rifles can be fed single rounds much easier than a semi-automatic, but the bolt action simply shines when being single fed over the lever action, and this is a distinct advantage when the use of "shorts", "shot shells", or other specialty rounds may be desired.

Those are the main reasons, I selected bolt action over the other types of rifles, but you also gained the same advantages with your selection.
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  #26  
Old 07-31-2015, 03:45 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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With the bolt action rifle (or leaver action for that matter) one can slip a hand over the ejection area and catch the empty brass, so no evidence remains to be discovered by another passing through the same area. This ability afforded by the lever & bolt action rifles is probably not a big selling point, but it could be an advantage under certain circumstances. One might learn the ability to catch ejected brass from a semi-automatic with a small net or with the use of a gloved hand and practice, but it certainly will never be as easy as when using a lever or bolt action.

Both the lever & bolt action rifles can be fed single rounds much easier than a semi-automatic, but the bolt action simply shines when being single fed over the lever action, and this is a distinct advantage when the use of "shorts", "shot shells", or other specialty rounds may be desired.

Those are the main reasons, I selected bolt action over the other types of rifles, but you also gained the same advantages with your selection.
It is a lot easier saving the brass that way, too.

Regarding the double shotguns - Up until my late 20's, I used a Rem 870 for all bird hunting, and some slug hunting (diff barrel). Bought that shotgun with savings from working the County Fair when I was 14. Still love it, but only use it for duck or geese now.

I was at a gun show, and saw this off-brand Italian O\U. I can't remember the price, but it was going for less than brand name shotguns, so I picked it up. Used that as my primary grouse-pheasant gun until a few years ago. Never let me down, and after refinishing the wood - not a bad looking piece.

Then I picked up a Savage 20g O\U. The price was very reasonable, again, about the same as a brand name pump.

So I think there are doubles ( O\U ) out there that are affordable and serviceable firearms.
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  #27  
Old 08-03-2015, 01:53 PM
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The George Bush $600 tax rebate that I received paid for a Mossberg Silver Reserve Turkish made 12 ga O/U that also came with a set of 20 ga barrels w/forearm. 5 Choke tubes for each gauge. Our local Ace Hardware had it on sale for...........wait for it.............. $600 + tax.
My two SXS's, a 410 and a 20, are both Stoeger Uplanders, made in Brazil. Good, sturdy guns, less than $400 each if I remember right.
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  #28  
Old 08-08-2015, 09:28 PM
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When my grandfather died, he had a Marlin 24" bbl .30-3. a 16 Ga single shot Winchester, and a .22 LR rifle. He had from the end of WWI worn out two Mod. 94 Winchesters rebarreling one himself, and decided that he liked the Marlin .30-30 better. One of my cousins has that gun today.

If I were starting from scratch, I'd probably get a centerfire rifle, and 12 Ga pump, and a .22LR rifle of some name brand variety. A good pistol in .355+ is a good bet with a M1911a1 being my first choice. That is bare minimum, but will take care of all likely needs.

With .22LR being in critical shortage like it is, I'd have to recommend a ML .32 flintlock rifle also.

jim
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  #29  
Old 06-11-2017, 05:05 AM
HonorableHojutsuRyu HonorableHojutsuRyu is offline
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Smile I prefer modularity in my battery

I am the odd person here as I prefer modular type firearms that I can easily rebarrel and headspace if needed or can swap out the barrel on a shotgun or can build an upper receiver for. This is why I prefer AR15 type rifles and carbines for a base gun and have multiple upper receivers to change caliber and if needed, different magazines to properly feed the specific ammunition.

My shotguns are mostly pumps but like the usefulness of the Stoeger Model 3500 semiautomatic. I like revolvers in .357 magnum but tend toward semiautomatic pistols in 9x19 parabellum and .40 S&W, also modular like the Sig P250 or P320 or a good P226.

I do like military surplus guns and I have some in .30-06, bolt and semiautomatic, and have hunted with them. However for precise hunting I go with Savage bolt actions or precision bolt action rifles that make every shot count while providing range if needed.

For .22 rimfire I prefer the Ruger Model 10/22 as it can be a single shot if specialty cartridges are used or it can be accurate with .22 long rifle and a bull target barrel. It can have a barrel swapped and headspace it easily as well as upgrade parts easily.

Were I to pick a lever action it would be a Marlin over any Winchester lever action as the former is much easier to clean and disassemble plus the one weakness of it can be easily fixed with an aftermarket part swap.

My preferences are based on my competition in competitive shooting sports where what I shoot is what I use for home. Oh, and I use brass catchers to secure my semiautomatic rifle brass when and where I can.

Ancestors used what they could afford and acquire in the past. In the 21st century I use current technology and its benefits to create my battery. Older technology still works, but I go with what makes sense to me.
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  #30  
Old 06-11-2017, 12:51 PM
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For farm and property use I have a Judge strapped to my thigh and a Rossi Circuit Judge in my ATV. They are loaded with multiple different loads ranging from a 45 long colt to 000 buck shot and #6 shot. .410 is available in any place that sells ammo and will take any animal or varmint in North America.
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  #31  
Old 06-13-2017, 06:56 AM
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.410 is available in any place that sells ammo and will take any animal or varmint in North America.
That seems overly optimistic to me.

I would never consider shooting Moose, Elk or any bears with a .410, and I wouldn't recommend it for deer at more than 50 yards.
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  #32  
Old 06-13-2017, 09:02 AM
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i don't see a lot of 410 in my area, the few places i know of in 100 mile radius have 100 boxes of 12 gauge and 100 of 20 gauge for every box of 410, assuming they stock it at all. only 410 available is size 6 shot (slightly larger than skeet shot). a box of 25 shells in 12 guage runs about $8 in skeetshot and a comparable 25 shell box of 410 in skeetshot runs $15. 20 gauge is roughly the same as 12 in price.

I had a 410 last year but sold it to a friend when i could not find ammo for it, or at least ammo at a reasonable price. i could get 12 or 20 ammo anywhere, in larger variety of shot types, and at half the price. also found them to be a little weak, suitable for coyote and smaller, too weak for whitetail deer unless it was rifled slugs (and only at close range with very good aim).

i see almost no demand for 410 out here
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  #33  
Old 06-13-2017, 01:13 PM
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Setanta, you are correct in that .410 ammo is disportionately expensive, as to its size and ability when compared to .12 & .20 gauge shot shells.

Here I have not seen much difference in the quantities of .410 shot shells & slugs on the shelves than in the past. Actually the availability of slugs for the .410 in both 2 1/2 & 3 inch lengths normally out numbers the quantities of slugs available for either the .12 or .20 gauge.

Probably fewer people hunt deer with larger gauge shotguns as opposed to rifles now accounts for that difference. Slug barrels are made for the larger bore guns, but I have never know anyone who owned one. However on the other hand I know several individuals that own and use bolt action .410's which have rifled barrels with rifle type sights on the barrels. One has a scope mounted on his bolt action .410.

I have a single shot .410 and it mostly just occupies space, but with #8 & #9 size shot it is devastating on snakes. There is no mistaking the fact that other size shot from a .410 will kill snakes, but the #9's are my first choice & #8's are my second. And slugs are not that anemic on predators, both the four & two legged kind. It certainly would not be my first choice for bears, but if nothing else was available, I guarantee you it will sure beat throwing rocks their direction, especially if slugs are being used.
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  #34  
Old 06-13-2017, 01:57 PM
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i heard they used to make 410 pistols for snakes, yeah that would account for some of the lack of interest here for the 410, we don't have many snakes this far north and the ones we do have are not dangerous (milk snakes sometimes, but mostly garder snakes). more likely to come across a moose or a wolf than come across a rattle snake although they are seen from time to time.
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  #35  
Old 06-13-2017, 03:34 PM
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That seems overly optimistic to me.

I would never consider shooting Moose, Elk or any bears with a .410, and I wouldn't recommend it for deer at more than 50 yards.
No Moose or Elk or Bear where I live. I have taken deer with no problem with a .45 long colt and .410 slugs as well as pigs. I use it for mostly varmints and snakes and gators, which we have a lot of in Louisiana. You can't get a shot of over 50 yards in the dense woods and swamps of Louisiana either. As far as availability, it's very plentiful here. Walmart has 25 rounds of #6 shot for $5.99. For me .39 a round is worth it for me. Very light weight when walking through heavy forest and swamp.
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  #36  
Old 06-13-2017, 11:04 PM
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$6 a box! that's dirt cheap! its creeping closer to $20 a box up here last time I checked (the cheapest I could find was #6 for $15, average price was higher), but we also have the un-safe act in the police state of NY and the city-ots want everything including bows and arrows to be illegal
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  #37  
Old 06-14-2017, 12:01 AM
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i heard they used to make 410 pistols for snakes, yeah that would account for some of the lack of interest here for the 410, we don't have many snakes this far north and the ones we do have are not dangerous (milk snakes sometimes, but mostly garder snakes). more likely to come across a moose or a wolf than come across a rattle snake although they are seen from time to time.
If it bites, stings or sucks blood, of man or his animals, we have it down South. Snakes are no exception. We have an abundance of the nonvenomous kind, but we have more than our share of the venomous ones also. Copperheads & Water Moccasins are most prevalent, but there are also plenty of the Rattlesnakes, (Pigmy, Timber & Canebrake Rattler, Diamond Back), & the Coral snake.

The "Snake charmer" was a short barreled single shot .410 designed for hikers, backpackers, campers, fishermen and other out door types in snake country. It was made in a number of different configuration, but even with a sling and carried over the shoulder, even a "short" long gun is not the best choice for anyone really active. Sitting in the corner of a boat it might not be that bad, but I prefer something closer at hand and less obtrusive most of the time. And for a backpacker, where weight is an overriding consideration, a .38 Special with two or three shot shells and three normal rounds, would probably have less weight and provide more protection from snakes and other predators than the single shot "Snake Charmer."

The only time I have even went snake hunting, a friend at work was telling me about having a number of his cattle snake bit. There was a small stream that meander through his pasture and he said snakes laid in the shade by the water and would bite the cattle (some at least) when they came to drink water. I asked, why he didn't kill the snakes.

He didn't own a gun, so we went over to the property one Friday afternoon after work. I took the single shot .410 and 3 or 4 boxes of shot shells. We walked along opposite sides of the stream, in an effort to not overlook a snake, and it was a Water Moccasin haven. Sometimes the snakes were within four to six feet of each other. Following the stream from fence to fence in his pasture I probably killed 35 - 40 Water Moccasins in 45 minutes to possibly an hours time. It was certainly the greatest number of snakes I have ever killed in such a short period of time. This was 78 or 79, because I transferred to another office in late 79 or early 80, decades before the .410 revolvers were available and if memory serves me well, also before the Snake Charmer first made it appearance.

Walking slowly to avoid walking upon a snake not by the water, I eliminated much of his snake population & problem both that one afternoon. At any rate he didn't have any more cattle bitten by snakes for quite some time after that afternoon.
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  #38  
Old 06-14-2017, 04:07 AM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Following the stream from fence to fence in his pasture I probably killed 35 - 40 Water Moccasins in 45 minutes to possibly an hours time. .
... and that is one of the reasons why I love MN. I would much rather deal our critters than yours.

There was always a .410 in bird or deer camp when I was growing up. I have much respect for them.

Nowadays, not any Children out hunting with us, which is sad.
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  #39  
Old 06-15-2017, 12:25 AM
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No Moose or Elk or Bear where I live.
But you still said:

Quote:
Quote:
.410 is available in any place that sells ammo and will take any animal or varmint in North America.
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  #40  
Old 06-15-2017, 01:36 AM
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Nowadays, not any Children out hunting with us, which is sad.
Sad indeed. My son does not hunt. I took him hunting when he was younger, and he seemed to enjoy hunting then, but now that he is grown, he doesn't hunt.

The youngest daughter does like hunting and has hunted the past three seasons. After it looked like she was going to continue hunting, I had a rifle cut down, so the stock fit her length of pull and a Pachmayr Decelerator Recoil Pad permanently (as opposed to a slip on) installed on the stock. It is "HER" Rifle now, designed to fit her exclusively, although it would probably fit most youths and/or women, but it is likely one of a kind in that department, having never been factory designed for women or youths.
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