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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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Old 10-30-2015, 09:53 PM
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Default Tire Repair

That old Case I recently bought started leaking ballast fluid around the valve stem. All four tires have valves so old and corroded that I can't put any air thru them. They're tube tires, so they'll have to come off to replace the tubes.

Anybody have experience with changing these big ol' tires? Should I mess with them myself or are there mobile services that will come out and do it on the property like they do with semi trucks?

Is the cost of a hernia repair any cheaper than the cost of mobile tractor tire repair?
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Old 10-30-2015, 11:33 PM
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Most larger tire dealers hear have a mobile unit for tire work and I would guess that is the norm these days. A check of the yellow pages for tire dealer/repair should answer your question about any mobile service.

I have ever used a mobile tire repair service myself, but a friend who had a mobile unit out to his farm for some work, reports the charges are about the same in answer to your second question.
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Old 10-31-2015, 12:21 AM
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I would leave it to the pros.
They'll make short work of a big job.
Those big old tires can hurt you.
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Old 10-31-2015, 04:26 AM
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Having messed with such in my younger years I would vote for the pro to do it.

Here's how I calculate it: Remounting those tires is a once in several years chore. Let the guys who do it every day make easy work of it rather than beating yourself to death to save a few bucks.

Depending upon your budget, you might even consider replacing the tires if they're showing signs of rotting.
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Old 10-31-2015, 07:57 AM
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Thanks guys for re-assuring me that I'm not wimping out by calling for help. I always hate conceding things like that, but maybe it's time to start making some concessions to age even if not to expertise.

While the outer rubber actually still looks good (no cracks visible on deforming it) I think I'll have them replace all four tubes. I've never seen valve needles so corroded before.

While I have your attention, let me also ask: do I really need the ballast? I won't be doing any row cropping, just using the rotary tiller once a year for a couple acres, mowing 5-10 acres occasionally and routine snow plowing.
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:41 AM
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Get a mobile service to do this for you. Do you realize how heave loaded tractor tires are?

Here's a chart - while this is for Rim-Guard (a little heavier than water) it will give you an idea of how heavy your tires are

http://www.rimguard.biz/wp-content/u...s-2014-PDF.pdf

It sounds like your tires are loaded with a mixture of calcium and water which was common many years ago. As you are finding out it is very corrosive and not used anymore. A common thing now is using plain window washer fluid or the heavier Rim-Guard.

2 reasons for loading tires - make it heavier for better traction but most importantly is ballast for when using a front loader. If you have a loader and will be using it I would recommend filling the rear tires or getting some weight on your 3-point hitch.

If nothing else when you get your tires fixed get rid of that calcium.
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coaltrain View Post

If nothing else when you get your tires fixed get rid of that calcium.


That does explain that corrosion. The washer fluid is basically alcohol, but it's not unusual to get down to -20deg here, so antifreeze is a better way to go-- ethyl or propyl glycol. That weight chart is interesting. We're talking a qtr ton!
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Old 11-01-2015, 10:21 AM
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That does explain that corrosion. The washer fluid is basically alcohol, but it's not unusual to get down to -20deg here, so antifreeze is a better way to go-- ethyl or propyl glycol. That weight chart is interesting. We're talking a qtr ton!
I've had window washer fluid in my rear tires for 8 years with not problems down to -20F.

Ask the tire guy what they use - filling rear tractor tires is quite common and they probably are setup to do it in the field.

Yeah - they are heavy! Just wanted you to realize that in case you were going to attempt to remove a tire by yourself - could easily fall on you and crush you.....
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Old 11-01-2015, 10:17 PM
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Agree with the tire service route..
If and a big IF.... You don't have to replace a rim or 4 eventually... If I recall you have a cat 2 3pt size tractor, so rims and tires are going to be reasonably expensive.. Good luck with that..

Like said move away from the salt solution.. Beet juice is the next heaviest fluid, but $$... At least in this area..

I did my own install on large frame compact tractor turfs.. I sued WW fluid and radiator antifreeze as it was available and the cheapest materials at that time to do a self install with..

If I had/have to do it again I will use RV non toxic antifreeze.. None of these products are near as heavy as salt water.. But then salt water is an expensive pain eventually.. Salt water = 11lb a gallon, beet juice = about 9-9.5lb (?), other products = about 8 or so lb per gallon..

Good luck..
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Old 11-08-2015, 11:46 AM
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Follow up: I called Hartje Tire in LaValle WI about 15 miles away. Cost of service call to the property, four new tubes and refill ballast fluid-- $435! A bargain at half the price. Very nice, knowledgeable people too.

I figure that would have been at least a 12 MFer job for me to do it myself
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Old 11-08-2015, 12:22 PM
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Follow up: I called Hartje Tire in LaValle WI about 15 miles away. Cost of service call to the property, four new tubes and refill ballast fluid-- $435! A bargain at half the price. Very nice, knowledgeable people too.

I figure that would have been at least a 12 MFer job for me to do it myself
For the amount of work involved and also the fact of handling those heavy tires that sounds like a decent price vs. trying to do it yourself. While none of us wants to spend money this is basically a maintenance item since your tires had calcium in them. Hopefully they will also include new valve stems.
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