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Old 11-17-2015, 09:54 PM
stickbowhntr Male stickbowhntr is offline
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Default Flour Choices for healthy eating

Ok, it's safe to say I am NOT going to give up breads and noodles. If I make my own what flour would be best to use health wise? For pasta, breads etc?
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:20 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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It depends.

There is an older cookbook called, "CookWise". I recommend you look for it. It has an entire chapter on wheat flour. The woman takes a scientific approach to cooking and will tell you in intimate detail the differences in the different flours and how they affect what you cook.

So a high protein, high gluten flour (seminola) is best for pasta, while a soft wheat that doesn't have a lot of gluten (found primarily in the southern US) is best for cakes and biscuits. Or how when making bread you may decide to mix whole grains and whole wheat flour then supplement with straight gluten to get the best rise.
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Old 11-18-2015, 01:19 PM
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In the book, Self-reliance Recession-proof your pantry, there is a chapter on wheat, grain mills and resources to purchase.
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:57 PM
stickbowhntr Male stickbowhntr is offline
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Originally Posted by CatherineID View Post
It depends.

There is an older cookbook called, "CookWise". I recommend you look for it. It has an entire chapter on wheat flour. The woman takes a scientific approach to cooking and will tell you in intimate detail the differences in the different flours and how they affect what you cook.

So a high protein, high gluten flour (seminola) is best for pasta, while a soft wheat that doesn't have a lot of gluten (found primarily in the southern US) is best for cakes and biscuits. Or how when making bread you may decide to mix whole grains and whole wheat flour then supplement with straight gluten to get the best rise.

JUST BOUGHT IT , THANKS
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Old 11-20-2015, 12:11 AM
Durgan Durgan is offline
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Originally Posted by stickbowhntr View Post
Ok, it's safe to say I am NOT going to give up breads and noodles. If I make my own what flour would be best to use health wise? For pasta, breads etc?
I buy wheat grains and make my own flour. I only make psyllium bread now but experimented considerably.

http://www.durgan.org/2015/July%2020...%20Bread/HTML/ 28 July 2015 Psyllium Husk Whole Wheat Bread
Recently introduced to Psyllium Husk, some was purchased from a bulk food store and a loaf of whole wheat bread was made. The whole wheat flour was ground by myself. All that is required is mixing and baking.Ingredients were 3 cups of flour, five cups of water and 2/3 to half a cup of Psyllium Husk. At first look the bread is excellent. Baking took two hours at 375F.The Psyllium Husk has binding properties which is advantageous for non gluten flour.

http://www.durgan.org/URL/?AFOZF 10 August 2012 Whole Wheat Grain Flour Pilot Bread
Attempting to purchase whole wheat flour, and reading the ingredient labels, it was ascertained that there was much confusion, certainly in my mind.A study was done from information on the internet and it was ascertained that regulations regarding whole wheat flour are chaotic. Conclusion, my view, that almost anything can be sold with the label whole wheat flour. First there is the pure physical problem with storing whole wheat flour. Pure whole wheat flour meaning “whole grain flour” cannot be kept for any length of time without removing the the germ.Commercially about 70% of the germ is removed removed to prevent rancidity , and as such cannot be labeled “whole grain”.
There are nutritional benefits by utilizing whole grain flour.Whole grain is a good source of calcium, iron, fiber, and other minerals.Much of this is removed in the commercial milling process. Considering this,it was decided to grind flour from wheat kernels or wheat-berry.


A Wonder Mill Electric Grain Mill was obtained and put to work http://www.durgan.org/URL/?WKOHA Producing flour as required removes the rancid issue, since the flour does not have to be stored, and all the nutritional benefits are available.
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Old 11-20-2015, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by stickbowhntr View Post
..... what flour would be best to use health wise? ?
The correct answer is "It doesn't make any real difference."

Grains are basically carbohydrates (sugar). They contain only from 1-5% protein, so you'd have to eat from 4 to 12 servings a day to supply your basic 60gm daily requirement (and it would still be incomplete protein). In doing so, you'd take in several thousand calories of carbs and quickly become obese.

Whole grains supply only a small bit of vitamins & minerals that processed grains don't, and it's still not anywhere enough to supply your daily requirements. Bread has more vitamins than the grain in it because the yeast is fairly rich in vitamins.

And of course, if you're gluten sensitive, you must avoid most grain.

Anybody who advocates grain (even whole grain) as a healthy food choice has obviously never looked at a nutritional value chart.

As Catherine mentions above, different grains will impart different textural qualities to the foods they're used in, but the nutritional differences are too subtle to be of consequence.

Last edited by doc; 11-20-2015 at 08:14 AM.
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Old 11-22-2015, 12:45 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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I agree with you, Doc. I'm gluten-free and have been for over a decade. I've recently eliminated all sugars (Stevia tastes like dirt to me), all grains, no root vegetables, no rice products, no corn products and no winter squash. All are too high carb.

But some people still eat wheat flour. Since the original poster said they weren't going to give up bread or pasta, I took them at their word.
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Old 11-22-2015, 08:03 PM
Durgan Durgan is offline
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"I've recently eliminated all sugars (Stevia tastes like dirt to me), all grains, no root vegetables, no rice products, no corn products and no winter squash. All are too high carb."

I only use a bit of molasses, bit of iron, on my morning cereal, but have eliminated all added sugar. Certainly I consider added sugar, and all it substitutes, to be almost a poison. I eat many grains leading by whole wheat grains.Nuts and various seeds. Eat all vegetables, potatoes,beets,carrots,kale,onions,corn,garlic,pum pkin,peas,collards,celery. All fruits available. All dried beans with soy beans leading. All these are used as a slurry juice pressure canned for off season use.
Meat is usually sardines in can and sometimes NZ mussels, and pemmican periodically.All listed here in various locations. http://durgan.org/2011/ Almost all my food is processed as little as possible. Most is grown in my garden or purchased locally when in season and pressure canned. About 500 liter jars of various last until next years growing season.
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Old 11-23-2015, 07:59 AM
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... Certainly I consider added sugar, and all it substitutes, to be almost a poison.
.
A little biochemistry: green plants turn co2 & h2o into glucose, a 6-carbon sugar (hexose). They then turn a lot of that into starch by merely hooking many glucose molecules into a long line. When we eat starch, we quickly break it back down into the basic hexoses.

Sugar is sugar, whether you get it by eating fruit, veggies or grains. "Refined sugar" is obtained merely by taking a rich source of hexose, like cane or beets, mashing it, dissolving it and separating out the little bit that isn't hexose. You can do the same with your liver, or let the factory do it for you. It's all the same.

While nobody would sit and eat a bowl full of straight sugar for breakfast, many of us do essentially that when we eat a bowl of cereal. The cereal is all sugar, but in starch configuration.

I'm not saying we shouldn't eat sugar or starch, but that grains are not "healthy" like they're cracked up to be. They are just sugar with a little bit of vitamins (in whole grain.)

Gluten must be avoided in those with Celiac Disease, and it probably exists in a mild, less obvious form in many people who don't realize it. There's also some new evidence that people who rely heavily on grains have a higher rate of Alzheimer's as they age. Is it the gluten, the high carb intake or some other factor?
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Old 11-23-2015, 12:50 PM
Durgan Durgan is offline
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My thrust is this.
http://bamboocorefitness.com/not-so-...gar-each-year/
  • Less than 100 years ago, the average intake of sugar was only about 4 pounds per person per year.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports that the average American consumes anywhere between 150 to 170 pounds of refined sugars in one year!

This is added sugars in all its disguises. Consumption of sugar in typical food is acceptable and indeed required.
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Old 11-23-2015, 02:52 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Has anyone considered buckwheat flour?

Better protien profile than wheat.

Also easy to grow and harvest.
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  #12  
Old 11-23-2015, 03:02 PM
Durgan Durgan is offline
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Personally I am very happy with whole wheat grains, but I use other at times particularly oats when available. I also use Dent or Indian corn nixtamalized for bread and cereal. The calorie content is acceptable when added sugar is eliminated.

My view is any food, cereal grains, has to be an improvement over commercialized processed dry cereal.
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Old 11-23-2015, 05:18 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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I would go by what, if any, grain seems to bother you. My wife has had digestive problems for decades. Our family doc has had her on Proton Pump Inhibiters for more than 10 years. I convinced her to see an Integrative MD for a different problem, and he suggested that she remove all grains, added sugar, dairy, and soy from her diet for two weeks, then try adding things back to see what was causing the problem. Almost immediately she dramatically improved. When she began adding things, she discovered that fresh dairy bothered her, but not hard cheeses (so we figured lactose), wheat was a problem, but she did fine with barley and rye, so it wasn't gluten that was the issue, but wheat itself...or wheat gluten. She can drink beer, but not any beer that has wheat in it.

From our experience, it would try an exclusion diet. If you don't feel better, then diet or grain is not the problem. I have read that folks who remove gluten from their diet when they are not gluten intolerant become gluten intolerant. I have also read the same thing for dairy. If you can digest wheat, don't fear it. I would, however, try to avoid GMO wheat and brominated wheat if possible, just on general principles.
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Old 11-23-2015, 09:32 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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I think we have a hi-jacked thread! ha-ha.

I went GF because I have a form of inflammatory arthritis called ankylosing spondylitis. It is marked by the bones of the spine fusing together. I'm partially fused in my hips and my neck is trying to fuse.

In the AS community there are people who swear by the no-starch diet and believe in "leaky gut syndrome". I was in such bad shape, I was searching for anything that might help since the cocktail of medications I was taking obviously wasn't doing the trick. I had tried eliminating the "nightshade" foods with only marginal success. We were going on vacation to Portland, OR and I figured what better place to try a GF lifestyle. Eating out in Portland means being surrounded by restaurant staff who are VERY food allergy aware.

WITHIN THREE DAYS (!!!!!) some chronic symptoms disappeared - my lifelong post-nasal drip and lots of IBS-like symptoms. It was amazing. For those reasons alone, I'd remain GF. But even better, within a year of GF eating, my arthritis went into remission.

Now the sad part is AS, like Lupus and other diseases, can mysteriously go into remission so this could be just a co-incidence. However, I do know if I'm accidentally "glutenized" my IBS-like symptoms come roaring back and I go into an arthritis flare (depending on how much wheat / gluten I've eaten) so I'm staying GF. My Rheumatologist won't test for celiac disease because I'd have to go back to eating wheat / gluten and it wasn't worth the risk.

Recently I went even further and eliminated the sugar and high-glycemic foods. I've lost weight (still have more to go), stopped one medication entirely and I'm in the process of weaning off two others. I have Addison's disease so I don't know if I'll ever be able to stop the low dose prednisone but I've lowered the dose.

I don't know if sugar is poison but I recently had a "carb meal" (gotta do it sometimes or the body stops responding to the high protein / high fat diet) and I thought I was going to die! I got a horrible headache and foot/leg cramps so bad I couldn't stop them. I dread "carb day" now.
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Old 11-24-2015, 08:50 AM
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Catherine: if you feel better on a certain diet, stick with it, regardless of "official" diagnoses. "A rose by any other name..."

Addison's disease presents a dilemma if you're also trying to lose weight. You have a tendency towards hypoglycemia if you don't get your carbs, but carbs make you fat. ...I hope you didn't lower your prednisone dose on your own. You require a certain amount of steroid in your system and with Addison's you can't make your own...BTW- make sure you carry a note with your ID stating you have Addison's and are on steroids. In case of some mishap, rescuers can save your life by quickly administering extra steroids fast.

Durgan: sugar is sugar, whether it's obtained from Domino or as starch from the best organic grain. What was life expectancy 100 yrs ago? What is it today? How big a difference does eating more sugar make?..I'm not saying you should eat sugar, but that it doesn't make any difference for us.

Back to the original question: the nutritional differences between various grains are quantitatively small and insignificant. Select them according to taste, not nutrition.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:12 PM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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Was at the market today and saw quinoa flour. It was pricey.

I have never tried it but enjoy quinoa itself. Very nutritious.

May try growing some next year.

It is closely related to lambs quarters and that stuff grows like weeds in my garden. Well, some consider it a weed. When weeding I leave it in place then harvest the young greens. They say you can eat the seeds similar to quinoa but the seeds are much smaller. I leave a bunch of lambs quarters to mature and they seed themselves in and the following spring they help choke out the noxious weeds.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:34 AM
stickbowhntr Male stickbowhntr is offline
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Got the book Saturday , its a good one
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  #18  
Old 11-30-2015, 10:34 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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Glad you like it.
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:50 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Professor View Post
Was at the market today and saw quinoa flour. It was pricey.

I have never tried it but enjoy quinoa itself. Very nutritious.

May try growing some next year.

It is closely related to lambs quarters and that stuff grows like weeds in my garden. Well, some consider it a weed. When weeding I leave it in place then harvest the young greens. They say you can eat the seeds similar to quinoa but the seeds are much smaller. I leave a bunch of lambs quarters to mature and they seed themselves in and the following spring they help choke out the noxious weeds.
My wife bought bulk quinoa and put it through the grain mill to make fresh flour. It seems to taste like a crispy whole grain cracker when baked into a flatbread.
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:23 AM
OzarksLady Female OzarksLady is offline
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My wife bought bulk quinoa and put it through the grain mill to make fresh flour. It seems to taste like a crispy whole grain cracker when baked into a flatbread.
How about a recipe Don?
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