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Hunting/Fishing/Trapping Hunting, Fishing, Trapping and related conversations.

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Old 11-19-2015, 03:16 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Default Where the Buffalo Roam...

http://news.yahoo.com/yellowstone-pa...174638381.html
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Give me a home where the buffalo roam...
And I'll show you a messy house...
What granddaughter and I sing when we pass one of several buffalo pastures in this area...

Pure and simple.. As the article shows habitat vs population.. This is how conservation and good scientific management should work.. Now there are a number of tools in the management toolbox.. Not all tools are appropriate at all times.. Many things go into choosing a tool... Cost, stress on the animals, time of year, location of the animals..

An interesting side note.. In the pictures the one where the bears are coming to feed on a carcass.. What looks like hay piled over the buffalo is grass the bear has pulled and used to try and cover the animal from a previous feeding.. Typical behavior..

Also.. Of all the populations of buffalo/bison in the US today, only a very few are of the pure strain... Most have some percent of domestic cattle in there DNA... I don't know the status of the Yellowstone herd..

Having grown up near that part of the country it is interesting to me..
Enjoy..
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Old 11-19-2015, 05:58 PM
CountryMom22 Female CountryMom22 is offline
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Very interesting. One question though, if they are concentrating on killing the cows and calves, yes this will slow the reproductive rate, but won't it also concentrate/limit the gene pool? As we have seen with dogs, etc., when the gene pool is concentrated we tend to double up on the negatives. Wouldn't this make the bison, as a species, weaker?
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Old 11-19-2015, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by CountryMom22 View Post
Very interesting. One question though, if they are concentrating on killing the cows and calves, yes this will slow the reproductive rate, but won't it also concentrate/limit the gene pool? As we have seen with dogs, etc., when the gene pool is concentrated we tend to double up on the negatives. Wouldn't this make the bison, as a species, weaker?
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Off-Daa.... Tough question for me... Although I spent a lot of time with biologist of different specialties, mostly large game, predator people.. I don't have details like that.. I'm going to guess... Short answer no.. Not enough to cause an issue.. Because.. Large territory of habitat, large enough total herd even though it may be in many different bands of animals to be diverse enough to not be an issue.. And some species are more tolerant of more closely related breeding... Bison seem more closely related to species (cattle) that are more tolerant like that.. Just my 2 cents..

I'm sure if you e-mailed MT, WY DNR or Yellowstone biologist they could give you more detail than you may want.. It may be hard to find someone that speaks "real people" language...

Good luck..
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Old 11-23-2015, 06:37 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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From my days breeding livestock, the species that have "gene suppression" carry more of their genetics in the male. I don't mean the males have more genes, but supposedly, the breeding male can suppress the expression of genes carried by the female, even if the female carries the dominant gene for a particular trait. That is why stud cattle and horses are so valuable (supposedly). Not only can they breed many females, but their genes are more likely to express in the offspring. I am not well-educated enough to prove this, but I did notice that when I had a light-colored coated goat buck, most of the offspring would have light coats, even when he was bred to dark (dominant color) females.

For what it is worth.....

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Old 12-14-2015, 02:25 PM
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Yes... Doninalaska, you are on the right trail far as my knowledge of animal genetics goes... There are different ways "herd" genetics works than other species genetics works..

I did contact Yellowstone visitors system.. And left an e-mail to be relayed to the bison biology people saying I needed info on how to answer questions about there management plan to people who don't understand zip about things like that..

I'm disappointing with no answer now.. Will have to rattle there cage again..

Like said... The WI deer season was down from last year.. Not by too much the DNR says, but I'm sure they are saying state wide... My area is significantly down... A big part of that balance is the damn bear numbers in this area..

Good luck..
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Old 12-14-2015, 11:08 PM
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re: inbreeding. It works both ways. Good genes are more likely to be continued, as well as bad genes. In Natural populations, there's not too many bad genes. They've all been selected out already.

Mendel, that monk who first worked out Mendellian genetics, was amazingly lucky. He worked with pea plants and chose to study seven different traits that all had simple dominant/recessive alleles. Most traits (phenotypes) are a result of complex interactions of multiple genes and multiple alleles. Had he chosen those, he never would have figured it out and we'd all still be thinking babies are flown in by the stork or found in a cabbage patch.
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