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Preparedness/Survival Skills/BOBs/Kits/Gear If it will help keep you going when TSHTF, talk about it here.

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  #1  
Old 12-24-2015, 05:01 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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Default importance of being prepared

Yesterday i drove across the mountains from Eastern Washington to Seattle.
My wife just had to come over for Christmas.
It was 50 miles of snow. Near whiteout conditions.
Right after we got over the pass they closed it.
It was closed all night and will remain closed until at least this evening. A few minutes later and we would have been stranded.
We alway have a survival kit but I would bet there are a bunch of cold hungery people on that mountain.
Now all I have to do is figure out how to get back home tomorrow. Might have to drive all the way around through Portland. An extra 4 hours for a usually 3 hour trip
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Old 12-24-2015, 08:24 PM
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Wow, glad you are out.
My brother drove through there years ago and chains were mandatory that time of year.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:09 PM
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Hope you get home ok. We have a pass here when we go to big city. It was snow storm on pass Fri after TG day. Here they do not plow the pass from 7pm to 7am.

DIL signed me for meeting at bank. Son canceled that trip as snow storm coming in and have that pass.
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Old 12-26-2015, 12:37 AM
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It is of paramount important to be prepared at all times! The swiftness at which inclement weather can strike is amazing, but there are so many other things that can bring devastation to our world in an instance, which without prior preparedness ones life or the lives of family members (and friends) may be held in the balance.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:20 AM
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As far as being on the road, being prepared is only one part of it. The other part is to use your head!

In such a connected world today it is so easy to look at detailed localized weather reports/forecasts for anywhere you might be travelling. Look at these and make an informed decision - if there is even a 10% chance of not being able to make the trip safely just don't go.

I spent many years on the road plus years driving a plow truck for the state. I don't know how many times I was working my butt off trying to keep the roads open enough for emergency services to be able to navigate but there are always a few that just have to go to Wal-Mart or some other destination that can wait.
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Old 12-26-2015, 11:32 AM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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So glad you made it safe.

5 years ago hubby had a job offer in eastern Washington State. The problem was the town was small and isolated and it is a college town (you probably know the exact location) so there was NO affordable housing anywhere to be found. The kid and I would have probably stayed living in the Boise, ID area or moved closer to his job (eventually) but still would have had to live on the Idaho side of the mountain. After years of hubby having to travel internationally, we just couldn't imagine taking a job in the states that required he live away from home for most of the work week. On top of that we know people who live and work there and, even though they live in town, they said they only got snowed in at work only a couple of times a year. Knowing my hubby, he would try to make it home!
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Old 12-26-2015, 02:00 PM
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The trip home was easy.
Roads were bare and wet.
Took the normal 3 hours.
We had a good time with the family so I guess it was worth the trip over.
Glad we didn't need our emergency supplies but I felt better knowing we had them.
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Old 01-18-2016, 02:15 PM
newbiehal Male newbiehal is offline
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Down here in GA we have snow only in the North GA mountains (most don't know that we have elevations of 5000 feet). But, people get all panicky when we get ice. The staple foods fly off the shelves and in the aftermath our insurance rates take a hit. I carry a "Go-bag" in the car even in good weather. I have a fire starter, survival tools, space blanket, etc, oh and when my CCW is approved I'll also be able to defend me and mine; you never know what you will need and when you might need it. Being prepared is like a second life insurance policy. And lastly, the days of the "Good Sam" Club went out with the CB Radio.
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Old 01-18-2016, 03:37 PM
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Newbiehal.... What my cousins near Atlanta tell me is that it is best to stay home when they have a little ice or snow.. Even though they are capable and experienced winter drivers, the vast majority are not and a danger to themselves and everyone around them...

On my last weekend road trip here in north WI, the state freeway was mostly clear.. Just some packed snow in some sheltered places... Thing is people don't know how to slow down... Speed limit is 70 or 65 depending on location and by the tracks out into the ditches many don't know to slow down when necessary... They must get on the freeway, radio blasting, hands off phone connected, what ever and think business as usual... Well, it isn't always as usual...

Keep safe...
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Old 01-18-2016, 10:30 PM
Nickathome Nickathome is offline
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We're due for our first major storm of the year, this coming weekend. As usual you will see spikes in snow blower sales right before the storm, instead of buying ahead of time. This plus the usual runs to the supermarkets by the the day before crowd to get milk bread and eggs, and you see how ridiculous most people are. Each year I see so many people who drive too fast for conditions and who wind up in the ditch because they don't heed warnings etc. I doubt any of these people carry any kind of preparedness equipment in their cars. You'll see these morons with the wide eyed deer in the headlights look when you slowly drive by them as they're waiting for AAA to show up. I've gotten to where I won't even offer assistance to these idiots anymore. It may appear cruel, but I just don't care. Why should I offer to help some idiot who is going to wind up in the same situation next year because they aren't smart enough to learn.

I always keep what I need in my truck to get me home in the even of a storm, plus I keep an old army blanket plus other gear with me in the event I get stuck or trapped in a traffic jam and have to spend the night etc.
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Old 01-19-2016, 10:08 AM
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Agreed. As I think I stated above - part of a preparation for a something like a pending snow storm is to plan to stay home and off the roads.

Last year when the western NY area got hammered (5'-6' of lake snow) a guy took a video of himself going out in his 2-wheel drive car to go to the store becuase he needed some Coke and potato chips.

Not only are you endangering yourself, you are adding to the problems the plow crews have getting the roads cleared. I remember the governor pleading with people to stay off the roads so they could work on clearing them.

Granted there are lots of folks who have to go to work or will be reprimanded/penalized (which is ridiculous in a major storm) but other than that why can't people just stay home for a couple days?
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:38 AM
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The cretins inexperienced in driving in the snow think that if they can make their car go 80, then it's ok to drive at 80. They don't realize that the trick is not to get it going, but to get it to turn or stop. And they need to remember that the road under them right now may be clear, but that next turn or intersection up ahead might be all ice.

After the first big snow of the year, it's a good idea to find an empty parking lot and go practice turning and braking under slick conditions to get a feel for it and practice counter- steering in a skid, etc.
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Old 01-23-2016, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
After the first big snow of the year, it's a good idea to find an empty parking lot and go practice turning and braking under slick conditions to get a feel for it and practice counter- steering in a skid, etc.
Used to do that when I was a kid first driving for fun - get going ~40mph and slam on the brakes and turn the wheel. Turns out it was a good learning experience also for the reasons you stated.
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Old 03-19-2016, 10:52 PM
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Default Winter isn't over yet.

I just saw the forecast for Minnesota - Wed, we could get 8-12 inches.

1) Glad I am a native and know how to drive in it.
2) Glad I am retired, and don't have to go and drive it.
3) Glad I have enough food, water, fuel, and off grid solar and wind, so we would do very nicely even if the power were to go out (which happens here very rarely)

A lot of "modern" people have no idea about how to prepare. I have wished for a major power outage (2-4 days), just so our elected officials would see just how unprepared we are for a major disaster. I asked several elected officials about what they would do if the power grid were to go down. Most said, they would wait for FEMA to show up. I kid you not! One did say, the city had a back up generator, which could run ONE of the city wells. When I asked how long the fuel would hold out, he said, "3 days". This city has over 35 wells, and they have the ability to run 1 well, for 3 days. This is for a city of 106,000 people. Scary stuff.

As for driving in snow, I live in Minnesota, but it amazes me how often people who live here, don't know that front wheel drive and four wheel drive, is different than rear wheel drive. And every year - in the snow - someone is killed in their 4x4 SUV, who spins out, and flips it in the ditch, just because they don't know how to drive in snow. 4x4 and front wheel drive, you should accelerate, if you start to spin. This is the opposite of rear wheel drive, where you should let off the gas. (which is what your instinct tells you to do). If you let off the gas in a front wheel drive, that is the best way to go into an uncontrolled spin. The laws of physics are strictly enforced!

Keep safe

Bear
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Old 03-20-2016, 11:58 AM
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I bet that one well with a generator supplies the mayor's house.

In rear wheel drive, you must "power out" of an "oversteer." An oversteer is what happens when you go into, say, a left turn and the rear end of your own vehicle starts passing you on the right: you start going sideways with your right flank leading the way. Steer to the right and apply gas. Lifting off the accelerator will make things worse and you will spin. Reducing power converts you into a cork in the current, unable to control things. Newton's Law: a mass in motion continues in a straight line unless acted upon by an acceleration.

With FWD, you apply gas and steer further to the left. Again it's a matter of "powering out" of the skid. {I have no experience with 4WD.}

It's just like canoeing: you must be going faster than the current to be in control, or you're just adrift in the current.
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