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Health Any kind of health issue, alternative medicines, herbal and folk remedies, etc.

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Old 12-25-2015, 11:56 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Default "Road Ditch, Wilderness" Treatment..

OK... In another and likely many other threads, it has been mentioned to use whiskey, rubbing alcohol, honey, hydrogen peroxide and other products to treat wounds away from better medical treatment availability..

So... I ask those with medical training, how would you treat wounds, and what of likely common available products WOULD you use if nothing better were available or better facilities were not available for an extended time/distance ???

Quite frankly.. I've got several RNs and a doctor in my family and I've ask this.. All I've ever gotten for an answer is a clinical tap dance around the question.. Even when I pressed them.. What would YOU do for your spouse or kids....?? I still got the same tap dance.. Even phrasing the question..What would you want DONE FOR your spouse, children in an emergency ?? No answer...

I'm sure there are answers that don't put there licenses etc in jeopardy...

Other than going to med school, how would someone get good info ??

Facts, details, thoughts ??
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Old 12-26-2015, 02:09 PM
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Maybe they don't give you an answer because they don't have one.
I knew a doctor that was certified in wilderness first aid.
I asked him why he went to the trouble of getting a certification since he was an MD already.
His reply was they didn't teach him what to do with no or limited supplies.
I sliced open a finger at a boat ramp and a guy asked if he could take a look at it. I was bleeding pretty good.
From the way he checked it out I have no doubt he was a doctor.
When I asked if he was he said no, not me, just wanted to see it.
He said his windsurfing friend could bandage it up.
She was also very professional and was either a doctor or nurse but again she wasn't admitting to anything.
Guess they had to watch out for the lawyers.
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Old 12-26-2015, 03:10 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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I think I covered it pretty thoroughly on the other thread. I'll add, it greatly depends on the kind of wound, the size and location.

The first step with all wounds is to clean the sucker and that takes liberal amounts of clean water and soap. It doesn't have to be antibacterial soap ... just soap. Your aim is to get anything that can cause an infection washed away. If the wound is going to bleed, you want it to bleed freely to push out any foreign matter that got pushed in.

If the wound won't stop bleeding with pressure, you're going to have to take further steps. Flour will help the blood coagulate. If that doesn't work, you'll have to try closing up the wound with steri-strips, butterfly bandages or do-it-yourself suturing. A tourniquet is a last resort because it is assumed anything beyond the cut off point (an arm, a leg) will later be amputated.

Let's assume the wound isn't that bad and it is just a cut. Once cleaned, keep it bandaged. Change the bandage daily, wash and dry the wound and inspect it at that time. With any sign of infection, I would use rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide to stem any developing infection. My experience with antibiotic ointment hasn't been good. The ointment seems to restrict air from getting to the wound. The bandage should be there to keep foreign material out of the wound but you want it to allow the wound to breath and stay dry.

A couple of years ago I received a nasty, jagged scrape all down my forearm. A piece of metal shelving fell and it cut into me from the elbow all down my arm and across my hand. I treated the gash as above but wasn't watching it well enough. I treated the part in the middle of my arm with hydrogen peroxide but should have realized the entire wound had gotten infected. I didn't take care of the infection at my wrist and upper part of my arm fast enough and now I have a scar both places. Had I been treating the entire length of the gash with hydrogen peroxide, it would have healed without scarring.

In short, there are two chemicals that work as antiseptics ... acid or a base (alkaline). The best antiseptic is alkaline: soap and chlorine bleach. However, bases are very hard on skin and other body tissues. For that reason, mild acids are used for wound cleaning: rubbing alcohol and hydrogen peroxide. Iodine is very strong acid. If you want to use an instrument for wound care (sterilize a suture needle, for instance, use bleach). If you want to clean a wound, use a mild acid.
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Old 12-26-2015, 05:13 PM
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Some good points.... For instance...
--
Maybe they don't give you an answer because they don't have one.
>>I don't know how the "specialty" categories are divided up in medical schools..
--
I knew a doctor that was certified in wilderness first aid.
I asked him why he went to the trouble of getting a certification since he was an MD already.
His reply was they didn't teach him what to do with no or limited supplies.
>> It wouldn't surprise me that "wilderness first aid" isn't a sub category of a specialty that would apply somewhere between ER specialty, and world mission type health training.. Possibly part of a military care specialty ?? Is there such a category as that ??

I'm sure Johnson and Johnson, Physer (spelling) and or who ever else writes text books has this kind of training available somewhere.. I'm also sure it isn't as easily sale-able skill set as other specialties.... So likely not a lot of people pay for this education..
--
However, back to treatments... Can it be as seemingly simple as 3-4 reasonably common chemicals to do most things..??? Possibly....
--
it greatly depends on the kind of wound, the size and location.
>> Of course... This is paramount.. You wouldn't treat a face wound near the eye the same as for instance a big muscle cut, like on the leg.. Some common things still would be control blood loss, shock control, and cleanliness..
--
Chemistry for dummies... Kinda/sorta...

OK... Good information, but... I'm chemically challenged.. That being not knowing what is an acid or base.. Other than vinegar, lemon juice, baking soda.. Simple cooking kind of things..

Of course the more training a person has, the more sophisticated there ability to use products will be..

I guess I'm saying.. In a given situation, or similar issue to treat, I would need a reference that says "use (fill in product name)" for this kind of issue, and how to dilute/prepare the product for use.. And an alternative product would be (name)...

Can it be made that kind of simple ??
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Old 12-26-2015, 08:15 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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You can try here for answers:

http://www.thesurvivaldoctor.com/

http://theprepperpages.com/
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Old 12-27-2015, 08:05 PM
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Medical professionals don't answer such questions because of "liability" .
They don't want to get sued for giving medical advice outside of normal practice.

http://www.thesurvivaldoctor.com/

Where there is no doctor ( FREE Online )
http://hesperian.org/books-and-resources/
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