BHM Forum      
Subscribe to Backwoods Home Magazine print or Kindle editions
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418

Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
Follow Us!



 
Backwoods Home Magazine, self-reliance, homesteading, off-grid

Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues
 Newsletter
 Letters
 Humor
 Free Stuff
 Recipes
 Print Classifieds

General Store
 Ordering Info
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 ePublications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Help Yourself
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

BHM Blogs
 Ask Jackie Clay
 Massad Ayoob
 Claire Wolfe
 James Kash
 Where We Live
 Behind The Scenes
 Dave on Twitter
Retired Blogs
 Oliver Del Signore
 David Lee
 Energy Questions
 Bramblestitches

Quick Links
 Home Energy Info
 Jackie Clay
 Ask Jackie Online
 Dave Duffy
 Massad Ayoob
 John Silveira
 Claire Wolfe

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Enter Forum
 Lost Password

More Features
 Meet The Staff
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address
 Write For BHM
 Privacy Policy

Retired Features
 Country Moments
 Feedback
 Links
 Radio Show





  
 

BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
Posting requires Registration and the use of Cookies-enabled browser.

  Who's In The Chat Room

Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Plants > Farm/ Garden/Flowers/ Shrubs/ Trees

Farm/ Garden/Flowers/ Shrubs/ Trees If it grows in the soil, this is the forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-23-2009, 03:52 PM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default Planting onions

Can I just take a regular onion from the grocery store and plant it? Or is there a special way to plant onions? And how do they grow? Is it like potatoes where you plant one seed and get a bunch or do you only get one per onion planted? Sorry, I don't know anything about planting onions, obviously! :P And when should I plant them? I'm in Northeast Ohio.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote

  #2  
Old 05-23-2009, 05:16 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 5,480
Default Re: Planting onions

you can still plant them now. *you can start them from sets, which lool like little bags of miniature onions,which are probably sold out by now, but check southern States or a feed store. stay away from TSC. I told the manager his onion sets are priced outrageously and he agreed with me. 2.89 for a little bag of 8o sets. At Southern States they sold for 90 cents. * I take the corner of a how and pull it through the soil to *make a little trench, when it is dry I pour water in it. then I set the onion sets in it, roots down. plant them about 2 inches apart, then rake dirt over them. Later, when they are big enough, pull every second one for green onions. that thins them and you get green onions. *Seeds I started in a pan and when they come up they look a bit like chives or some kind of grass. *When they are big enough transplant them like onion sets. *Good luck. *


oh, and there are old fashioned onions like walking onions and tater onions. I do not have experience with them. I am sure someone on here can tell you all about them and I can learn something new too.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-25-2009, 11:55 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default Re: Planting onions

Daffodil, there isn't much sense in buying an onion and planting it to produce one onion. However, it could probably be left and not harvested and produce many "sets" for you to plant.

I plant regular onions from sets. I also keep "winter onions" which is similar to leeks. But they are still onions. They put out "sets" at the top of the green and when those mature, they look like tiny miniature onions. That is like the "seed". You take those and plan them for the next year's harvest. Winter onions are called that because they can be left in the ground and come back on their own every year. I like them. "Regular" onions don't come back the next year if left in the ground, I don't think. Someone else will have to chime in and correct me if I'm wrong.

Onions are really easy to grow. Just as easy as bookwormom made it sound.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-26-2009, 01:59 AM
AlchemyAcres AlchemyAcres is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3,245
Default Re: Planting onions

Quote:
Originally Posted by daffodil
Can I just take a regular onion from the grocery store and plant it?
Regular bulb onions are biennials, so a regular onion from the store will set seed and not produce an acceptable onion crop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by daffodil
And how do they grow? Is it like potatoes where you plant one seed and get a bunch or do you only get one per onion planted?
Regular bulb onions only produce one plant per seed or set.
There are dividing-type onions that will multiply much like potatoes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by daffodil
Sorry, I don't know anything about planting onions, obviously! :P And when should I plant them? I'm in Northeast Ohio.
Regular bulbing onions can be planted in spring as early as the ground can be worked.
Sets are the easy way to go, but there's advantages to planting started onion plants or starting your own plants from seed.
Onions from seeds or plants, instead of sets, produce better, are hardier and store better.



~Martin
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-26-2009, 02:22 AM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Kentucky
Posts: 1,189
Default Re: Planting onions

ANS chipminks will eat onions off under the ground.
Paul the onion you refer to as a "winter onion" is what we call a walking onion. The lil sets on the end of the blade mature and fall to the ground and start the process all over again.
The onions that Martin is saying multiply like potatoes we call "tater onions" (yes thats hillbillie) for potatoe onions. You plant the big ones to make lil ones and plant the lil ones to make big ones.
Here in Kentucky I usually plant onions in the fall and harvest in June. Am also thinking or raising my own onion sets this year. It is hard in this area to find sets in early spring to plant.

Have a great day!
stella
__________________
www.mcguirehomestead.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-26-2009, 11:57 AM
daffodil's Avatar
daffodil Female daffodil is offline
Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 850
Default Re: Planting onions

I think I'd rather go with the tater onions. Sounds like the better route, you get more onions that way.
__________________
Live, And Let Live
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-26-2009, 12:01 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default Re: Planting onions

Stella,

From what I've been reading, the walking onions and winter onions are the same thing. Walking onion is probably more correct. From what I've read there are two types of walking onions. There is the Egyptian Topset and the Catawissa Topset. The Catawissa Topset appears to be the type that we have here simply because the Catawissa gets bigger and mine seem to fit the height description more than the Egyptian Topset. I think I read that they originated in Canada.

Also, the walking onions are winter hardy to -35 F. Something else I never knew is that the sets are called bulbis... and they are edible.

Paul
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-26-2009, 01:57 PM
AlchemyAcres AlchemyAcres is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3,245
Default Re: Planting onions

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulNKS
Stella,

From what I've been reading, the walking onions and winter onions are the same thing. Walking onion is probably more correct. From what I've read there are two types of walking onions. There is the Egyptian Topset and the Catawissa Topset. The Catawissa Topset appears to be the type that we have here simply because the Catawissa gets bigger and mine seem to fit the height description more than the Egyptian Topset. I think I read that they originated in Canada.

Also, the walking onions are winter hardy to -35 F. Something else I never knew is that the sets are called bulbis... and they are edible.

Paul
The Catawissa supposedly originated near Catawissa, PA
They are usually taller than standard Egyption walking onions, but what truly sets them apart is the fact that they produce topsets on top of topsets.

~Martin
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-26-2009, 03:19 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default Re: Planting onions

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlchemyAcres

The Catawissa supposedly originated near Catawissa, PA
They are usually taller than standard Egyption walking onions, but what truly sets them apart is the fact that they produce topsets on top of topsets.

~Martin
Then that's what mine are. I get topsets on top of topsets...
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-27-2009, 12:50 AM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Kentucky
Posts: 1,189
Default Re: Planting onions

Who'd a thunk it? Well Martin with that description I guess I got the walkin Egyptions then. Cause mine have like bulb or bulbis in 2 different places on the tops. Dang that made muh head hurt. Have been edumacated.
Thanks guys for all the info.

Have a great day!

stella
__________________
www.mcguirehomestead.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-27-2009, 10:46 AM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default Re: Planting onions

stella, do you mean that you get topset that also shoot up a stem and make more topsets? I thought that was what Martin called the Catawissa walking onion? Am I confused or are you? LOL
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-27-2009, 05:41 PM
bookwormom bookwormom is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 5,480
Default Re: Planting onions

sounds very interesting. I got a few starts from a friend in Texas and they have not started doing anything as of now. Heck I am really curious. so when do you get regular onions from these? do they make the bulbis the first or the second year?
and does anyone here raise tater onions? I gather they multiply like gladiolas?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-27-2009, 08:50 PM
sbemt456 Female sbemt456 is offline
Grand Master Pontificator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern Kentucky
Posts: 1,189
Default Re: Planting onions

Well Paul I think it was me who had the brain cell misfire. Dang it I got walkin onions of some type, they do have sets on top of the stem on top of a stem. My bad.

Bookwrmom you are correct about tater onions multiplying like glad bulbs. We use such a large number of onions that it is hard to have enough to use and re-set. So I am thinkin this year of raising set for maybe Stuttgarter onions. We have a gardening book that says ya can get a bushel of onion sets from one ounce of seed. I would be happy with half that amount.

Have a great day!

stella
__________________
www.mcguirehomestead.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-28-2009, 03:18 PM
Anon001 Anon001 is offline
Inactive Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,032
Default Re: Planting onions

Bookwormom,

Any "walking onions" I have set early do produce the same year. They can be dug before or after they put on the bulbis (sets).
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -2. The time now is 06:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 1996 to Present. Backwoods Home Magazine, Inc.