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Old 04-03-2016, 10:41 AM
Northisgood Male Northisgood is offline
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Default Permaculture

I've been veary interested in permaculture. I would like to hear if some of you folks have done or are doing things inline with the permaculture idea.
I'm Looking forward to hearing anything on this subject.
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Old 04-03-2016, 08:50 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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I have a rough hillside that I have used to naturalize American Plum trees, asparagus, daffodils, and a few hyacinth.

The closer to the creek at the bottom of the hill the better things do, but when I get too close the plants get washed away when the creek is up. It is a work in progress.

Have you seen this yet? It is a free online course in beginning permaculture. https://courses.ncsu.edu/hs432/common/podcasts/
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Old 04-04-2016, 10:43 AM
doc doc is offline
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I've always considered "permaculture" to be one of those fads started by people who just wanted to sell books & make a name for themselves by stating the rather obvious.

H. sapiens started to really prosper as our ancestors moved out of the jungle where they lived as hunter/gatherers (real permaculture) and started to develop food production techniques culminating now in hi yield industrial agriculture.

Farmers trying to earn a living by producing food, like all other businesses, must minimize costs and maximize profits. The rest of us, gardeners &
homesteaders, just need to satisfy our own needs. Even without use of pesticides, etc, we always seem to get a big enough yield to have plenty leftover to give away.

Terri has used a common sense approach to maximizing benefit on a specific topological problem that doesn't lend itself well to row cropping. I bet she figured it out without reading a book first.

A central point of Permaculture is "sustainability." But NO technique is truly sustainable unless ALL produce remains on the property in question, including its metabolic remains (ie- urine & manure of the consumers). The nutrients in the produce must be replaced cyclically for the process to continue indefinitely. Industrial methods can accomplish that just as well as feel-good fad techniques.

BTW- welcome to the forum. I'm like you: I'm moving North when I retire.
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Old 04-04-2016, 12:32 PM
Terri Terri is offline
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Quote:
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Terri has used a common sense approach to maximizing benefit on a specific topological problem that doesn't lend itself well to row cropping. I bet she figured it out without reading a book first.
I did need to read the books and see the videos, though. I grew up in a semi-arid place where if you did not water your trees, there WERE no trees! It took me a while to learn how Permaculture worked!

Permaculture spoke of where to place the trees for adequate light and water, which I needed to learn and I am still fiddling with that. I also tried to naturalize a lot of plants that simply died on me. Still, I have had SOME successes.
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Old 04-05-2016, 10:16 PM
Northisgood Male Northisgood is offline
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Thanks for the comments. I have been looking at this for a few months now and I'm thinking that there is some real benefit from this system. Believe me I'm not a fade follower. But permaculture makes cents to me. I guess this is isn't for everyone. I have looked in to taking a PDC but with traveling for work not sure when I'd have time. But in the meantime I'll keep reading what I can and maybe I'll put in a hugelkultur this summer. Keep the discussion going. Could be really interesting.
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Old 04-06-2016, 09:42 AM
doc doc is offline
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Hugelkulture is another one of those popular-press fads. The books & articles give you the impression that everybody must do this to succeed. In fact, it's just the common-sense way to build up top soil in areas with shallow or poor soil.

Good soil, after all, is just the remains of well-composted organic material. That occurs naturally in some areas and less so in others-- plenty to rot in the forest and little to rot in the desert. It's just a raised bed without the retaining walls.

Maybe I'm over-simplifying and assuming this stuff is "common sense" because I was taught gardening from an early age and then studied biology later?
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Old 04-06-2016, 02:52 PM
wildturnip Female wildturnip is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc View Post
Hugelkulture is another one of those popular-press fads. The books & articles give you the impression that everybody must do this to succeed. In fact, it's just the common-sense way to build up top soil in areas with shallow or poor soil.

Good soil, after all, is just the remains of well-composted organic material. That occurs naturally in some areas and less so in others-- plenty to rot in the forest and little to rot in the desert. It's just a raised bed without the retaining walls.

Maybe I'm over-simplifying and assuming this stuff is "common sense" because I was taught gardening from an early age and then studied biology later?
doc, I think you are over simplifying it. I tend to think that if I know something, everyone else does too and I'm learning that that's not always true!
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Old 04-06-2016, 09:54 PM
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Tim Horton Male Tim Horton is offline
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Years ago out west, I had a kinda steep hill side along the end of a point.. It was thin native prairie grass on the beginings of hard red clay soil..

A number of rocks there would chip off into about 2" thick slabs.. I took the slabs and dug just enough to lay them flat along the hill side in terraces..

Planted some wild raspberries, and raspberries I don't remember where I got them from.. Just left it alone to its own fate..

A couple years later out of maybe 50' total raspberry plants you could get a quart or so if you watched them close and worked at it..

The terraces eventually filled up with run off soil, leaves, pine needles etc.. The raspberries went crazy and produced all we could use.. IF... You could get to them..

Erosion was never a problem.. Long grass, weeds were never a problem.. Far as I know it is still there..
---
I have several electronic books about straw bale gardening in my Kindle on PC... Have read bits and pieces of a few.. Sounds like it is not too hard to do as its capabilities allow... I'm sure you have to replace the bales periodically, but they are bound to be useful in compost of other humus producing way..

My 2 cents of experience..
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