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Water Drinking water, wells, ponds, saving, purifying, etc.

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Old 06-24-2016, 05:57 PM
NRAamy NRAamy is offline
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Default Water Storage in an Apartment

Hi, I'm new here. Looking for suggestions for storing water in an apartment, without the apartment looking like a storage shed. All available space has been filled with food storage. Live near Orlando, Florida, so it's freaking hot outside. Don't really want to store water on the patio because of the heat. Ideas?
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:24 PM
Kachad Male Kachad is offline
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Originally Posted by NRAamy View Post
Hi, I'm new here. Looking for suggestions for storing water in an apartment, without the apartment looking like a storage shed. All available space has been filled with food storage. Live near Orlando, Florida, so it's freaking hot outside. Don't really want to store water on the patio because of the heat. Ideas?
We store short term emergency water needs with 2 liter bottles. Here, they are kept in the basement, but in an apartment, I would perhaps look at getting some decorative sturdy boxes, fill them up with the 2 liter bottles, and use the boxes for things such as reading platforms, side tables, bases for plants, TV, etc.
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Old 06-25-2016, 05:56 AM
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randallhilton Male randallhilton is offline
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Have you already raised your bed? There's lots of space there if you raise it high enough for 3, or even 5 gallon bottles.

Also, if you're at an apartment, odds are they have a pool. You need to have a good water filter (We use a Berkey's but there are many brands and styles with similar capabilities).

Also consider a bladder for your bathtub. You can hold about 100 gallons in your tub. Be savvy and if you suspect an interruption in services (hurricane, civil unrest, maintenance etc.) then fill up the bladder.

Also: We keep a few pounds of "pool shock" powder which can be used to disinfect thousands of gallons of water (instructions in a different thread).

Also: Prepping involves . . . well . . . preparation. If you have a balcony, is there possibility for rigging a tarp to catch rain water? It doesn't have to be huge -- 10 square feet of tarp with a drain fitting can quickly fill up a 5 gallon bucket during a rain storm.
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Old 06-25-2016, 02:24 PM
Knowitall Male Knowitall is offline
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We store short term emergency water needs with 2 liter bottles.
Yes, those work great. They are incredibly tough and I can fit about 8 into a milk crate, making them very portable. I've never had a 2-liter bottle leak, so I'd feel comfortable storing them under a bed, and maybe even laying them sideways and stacking them.

Since your space is limited, you may just have to settle for storing a little less water than you'd like for the moment.
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Old 06-25-2016, 03:15 PM
papa bear papa bear is offline
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Being limited on space you might have to sacrifice food for your water. Remember you need water more then food. There are all kinds of spaces people don't think of. Maybe a sacrifice of closet space. Say the bottom half of the closet
Couple of other things

Have you thought about burying your food outside some where in airtight container? You don't have to own the property if you only know it's there

Keep bladders dry and folded out of the way till you need them. After SHTF it wouldn't mater how they looked. You could fill them before you are hit

As Randel suggested also. Look for alternate source. One of the prime preppers tools are water purifacation kit. Filters and tablets are a must. Including ways to make chlorine. There are more source then you know, sprinkler systems, fire hydrant pipes(which really need purifying), that little stream that the construction of the apartments built over. That most people never notice.

The main thing is to open your mind and think about possiblities
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Old 06-25-2016, 10:04 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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the tub bladder is a great idea for long term storage---if you happen to have 2 full baths in your apt. Other wise, keep one on hand and fill it when you know the need is arising.

JVC
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Old 06-26-2016, 09:59 PM
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When I lived in an apartment I had access to the craw space. I stored water in jugs there. It was never cold enough to freeze, and yet always cooler than the house.
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Old 06-28-2016, 01:56 PM
Knowitall Male Knowitall is offline
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When I lived in an apartment I had access to the craw space. I stored water in jugs there. It was never cold enough to freeze, and yet always cooler than the house.
Crawlspaces are great! I've got a few dozen bottles of homebrew, worm bin, buckets of paint, fans, 2L bottles, gardening stuff, and a spare propane heater down there.
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Old 06-28-2016, 10:49 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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have you considered those 5 gallon water jugs? they are like oversized water bottles with a sealed cap, the caps are designed to fit on dispenser stands but can also work as pop tops. 4 or 6 jugs would not look out of place and there are stands that can store them stacked on their sides. they are extremely common and I have seen them on dispensers in repair shop waiting rooms, office lobbies, and they have one in the scalehouse at the local transfer station. I try to keep 10 full ones at home myself, as long as they are unopened and kept in the shade they are fine (food grade plastic, heavy type). I can open them any time I need to be sure I have safe drinking water and use rain water for everything else.
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