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Old 07-05-2016, 09:31 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
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Default Carbon Monoxide poisoning

Long story short: Bosch on demand LPG water heater plugged up with soot over the course of 10+ years and filled the house with CO gas. Me and the Mrs about bought the farm but went to the ER instead. Installed a CO detector after that episode. Last night the CO alarm sounded. Turns out to be the 20 year old LPG refrigerator. Thank goodness for the CO detector! Never a dull moment. Just thought I'd pass this tidbit of information on.
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Old 07-05-2016, 10:41 PM
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DavidOH Male DavidOH is offline
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Good to hear you are still with us. My appliances are natural gas and I have the CO detector nearby them. Bosch makes quality products, so I hate to hear that was sooty. They make battery powered CO and smoke detectors, some better than others.

I just replaced my 10 year old smoke detector..... they do wear out.
( Americium half life.... )

Stay safe !
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Old 07-06-2016, 03:37 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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good that you had a detector!

remember the combination smoke and co2 detectors don't really work, smoke rises to the ceiling and c02 sinks to the floor, so its only going to work for one or the other effectively. I have 3 in my cabin positioned to focus on one task or another, they run on 3 AA batteries and I use Li rechargeable energizers an change once a month.
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Old 07-06-2016, 04:23 PM
Lurch Male Lurch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Setanta View Post
good that you had a detector!

remember the combination smoke and co2 detectors don't really work, smoke rises to the ceiling and c02 sinks to the floor, so its only going to work for one or the other effectively. I have 3 in my cabin positioned to focus on one task or another, they run on 3 AA batteries and I use Li rechargeable energizers an change once a month.
Good to know. Mine is a combo unit. I have it at eye level. Will do more research now.
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Old 07-06-2016, 05:26 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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C02 sinks to the floor, its heavier than air and pools to the first foot or so being very toxic, a foot off the floor is the best place to set C02 detectors, it will detect dangerous levels there first, but by the time enough smoke fills the room to be detected at that same level its already too toxic to get out. smoke rises to the celing first so a smoke detector high up will go off before too much can fill in. by the time a detector at middle height would detect anything there is already dangerously high levels in the room.

the old idea to crawl on the floor to escape a burning building has been discredited since you would be in the dangerous c02 area, they now recommend staying low with your head between 3 and 4 feet off the ground as that is the last place the air gets contaminated. its all about the slight differences in weight of gasses.
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Old 07-06-2016, 10:54 PM
doc doc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Setanta View Post
C02 sinks to the floor, its heavier than air and pools to the first foot or so being very toxic, a foot off the floor is the best place to set C02 detectors, it will detect dangerous levels there first, but by the time enough smoke fills the room to be detected at that same level its already too toxic to get out. smoke rises to the celing first so a smoke detector high up will go off before too much can fill in. by the time a detector at middle height would detect anything there is already dangerously high levels in the room.

the old idea to crawl on the floor to escape a burning building has been discredited since you would be in the dangerous c02 area, they now recommend staying low with your head between 3 and 4 feet off the ground as that is the last place the air gets contaminated. its all about the slight differences in weight of gasses.
I'd forget the new recommendations, if that's what indeed they are: in an active fire, the smoke is warm and rises, leaving a smokeless space on the bottom foot or so. I can verify that, having been in a fire several yrs ago.

CO is a minor problem in an actively burning building and any produced is still part of the hot gases and would also rise. CO is produced a very little at a time over a long period of time by a defectively ventilated stove or furnace. It would eventually cool, sink and then build up near the floor in that situation.

In "smoke inhalation," the problem is not so much that soot has been inhaled, but that hot smoke has been inhaled and the heat itself damages the lungs.

Last edited by doc; 07-06-2016 at 11:01 PM.
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