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  #1  
Old 10-19-2016, 11:03 PM
rolson3819 Male rolson3819 is offline
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Default work gloves

Hello everyone; I am looking to find information on some good quality work gloves for the homestead. I am looking for gloves that can get wet, keep thorns out of my fingers are sensitive enough so my finger tips can plant young seedlings without damaging the roots and hold up to abrasion from wood and tree bark. Suggestions?
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Old 10-20-2016, 12:28 AM
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A few different pair of gloves...

Tractor supply has a good selection. I like the leather gloves but getting wet doesn't go well. Mechanix type gloves are also very good for lots of tasks and give good feel plus would work for doing wood.
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Old 10-20-2016, 02:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolson3819 View Post
. . . I am looking for gloves that can get wet, keep thorns out of my fingers are sensitive enough so my finger tips can plant young seedlings without damaging the roots and hold up to abrasion from wood and tree bark.
From my perspective, I wouldn't expect a single pair of gloves to perform well under all those conditions. Over the years, I've come to view work gloves as consumables. For rough work, like wood chopping, rock hauling etc. I buy bundles of cheap, leather palm work gloves that may last a day or two in hard use.

If I need more tactile protection -- maybe while operating equipment, tying rope, driving etc. I like better quality leather gloves.

For gardening -- well, mostly I think it would be called planticide . . . I like the cheap fabric gloves with a latex or nitrile palm gloves which breathe, protect, and are tactile.

A note about waterproof gloves: Keep in mind that although waterproof keeps liquids out, they also keep sweat in. Your hands will still be wet if you're working hard.

I've also used the synthetic fiber "mechanic" gloves. I've caught some on sale and like them pretty well. I can't speak to how durable they are because I haven't given them a hard enough workout.
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Old 10-20-2016, 09:03 AM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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I agree that few different pairs would be best

personally I have a pair of Kinko insulated gloves that I use for general work, by avoiding getting them wet they tend to last a year. I have Kinko chainsaw gloves as well for sawing work and they are good for thorns too. I get the 3 pack of heavy duty leather gloves from tractor supply for general work and wear the most worn out pairs when its wet work.
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Old 10-20-2016, 09:57 AM
doc doc is offline
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Let me add in the contrarian view from the Alternate Universe that I live in: I almost never wear gloves. I only use them when shoveling snow or clearing the invasive, thorny wild rose from my property.

When I used to wear gloves, I found that you can replace cheap gloves frequently and still come out money ahead rather than buying "good" (ie- expensive) gloves.

Randal makes a good point about waterproof or heavily lined gloves and sweat: I got a pair of HarleyDavidson heavy gauntlets. They were very warm when just wearing them around even in the coldest weather, but my hands actually were colder when riding the bike than with cheap gloves because of the wet-in-the-wind factor.
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Old 10-20-2016, 11:12 AM
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I almost never wear gloves. I only use them when shoveling snow or clearing the invasive, thorny wild rose from my property.
My "he man" tendency is not to use gloves but, as you mention, clearing briers and the like definitely influence that decision.

Howsomebutever . . .

A few years back, I made the conscious decision to be more diligent about donning my hand shoes. Over the years, as self reliance became more prominent in my thought processes, I began to realize and appreciate the risks of hand injuries.

In the work place, employers track "lost time injuries" because of that category's importance to their bottom line. In a homestead environment, a lost time injury could mean not getting a fence mended before the cow gets out . . . or crop planted at the right time.

An infection exacerbates the risk, possibly creating a long term debilitation, not to mention additional costs in both cash as well as productivity.

I was concerned that my hands would become too soft (I used to joke that I wore gloves in order to protect fine finishes I haven't noticed much of a change. I still have good callouses and dirty fingernails. What's missing are the bloody knuckles and myriad nicks and scratches. In fact, the money I have saved on manicures has more than paid for the gloves I buy.
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Old 10-20-2016, 02:26 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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I'm another who prefers not to wear gloves, and after 40 plus years working with stone, the skin is pretty tough. For some reason, I've always felt that gloves destroy the tactile sense I find important. Currently have been attacking an infestation of burr grass, and found that if I can find that right spot to grasp under the crown, the burr grass will come out of the clump of other grass it is growing with without having to dig up the whole mess. Can't do that with gloves, and even though my thumb and forefinger get a bit tender from being stuck with the burrs, it is not as bad as wholesale digging up the pasture.

One thing I found is wearing those latex, or nitrile type gloves come in handy when working garden areas home to the fire ants--but working the burr grass would just tear them up.

JVC
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Old 10-21-2016, 04:20 AM
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I'm another who prefers not to wear gloves, and after 40 plus years working with stone, the skin is pretty tough.
You would be in good company with this guy. I met him this past summer, we was lining a culvert with stone. Bare handed. Alone -- just him and his pet "bobcat." I didn't shake hands with him but his paws looked like clubs. Close to a solid half century of stone work.




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Old 10-21-2016, 01:28 PM
jvcstone jvcstone is offline
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thanks for that link, Randall. I did build a two story all masonry building in Liberty Hill, but nothing at all like this guy (Mr. Bishop) Somewhere down in Florida is another one man castle built of coral stone if I remember right, and not too long ago, I saw an article about a guy who has "built" his own (and a couple of others) underground cave dwelling by carving out rooms and passageways in a sandstone formation--sort of like Petra in Jordan. It's in Arizona or Utah I think. It is amazing to me the dedication and perseverance a person needs to accomplish such things.

JVC
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Old 10-21-2016, 04:05 PM
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I am like you Randall . It depends on what I am doing . Chai sawing trees or splitting fire wood with the Maul I t is those cheap $2 grey split leather slalom gloves. But sometimes I need more dexterity and use what ever mechanica gloves on sale/ I used to do a lot of remodeling in the house and tried deer skin for q long time. Good grip and feel for nails. Etc but @$18. Pop I moved on. The lowes mechanics glove are 10 and pretty good for that type of work . Gardening - bare hands .
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