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Old 11-28-2016, 03:15 AM
ron45 ron45 is offline
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Default Heating with wood

Sometimes I'm too big a fan of `just do it' and work it out as you go. I'm sorry to say I've done this with my wood burning stove since 83 when we went off grid.

I've talked with others since and learned that my stove should have it's own air supply and not pull it from the house. I have not done this yet because we also have a radiant floor system that helps keep things comfortable. Also there have been a series of things to take care of this fall that held up the implimentation of the outside air project

Still.... I'm thinking I should put a damper in the chimney untill I get the air supply worked out. I did this years ago for another part of the house with a small Rumsford fire place. It draws it's air under the floor from inlets on the south side of the house.

Is there some outstanding book on collected good ideas that help burn less wood. Our stove has a gasketed door but the air control part is a series of holes that either line up or can close but that part is not gasketed to I'm assuming some loss in that area.

I cut my own wood from my own property as part of A USFS tree thinning/fire danger abatement program. It's a serious issue here in Lincoln County New Mexico. High desert juniper pinon forrest with tons of wind much of the time. I look forward to learning some more about treading a little more lightly on our home planet. [finite resources and all that]

Ron

Last edited by ron45; 11-28-2016 at 03:19 AM. Reason: sp
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:47 AM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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most wood stoves draw air from inside the house, its a relatively new idea to pull air from outside. the air inside the house is already warm so your combusting with warm air and sending it out the chimney. pulling cold air from outside leaves all the warm air inside the house, makes it more efficient to heat this way. wood is carbon neutral, trees that die in the woods give off the same carbon as they rot anyway.

I would use an outside air source but I just have a basic cast iron stove, too many openings in it so can't set up such system, don't want to upgrade since my stove is more versatile for cooking on, sacrificing efficiency for versitility
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Old 12-02-2016, 03:14 AM
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Quietgentleman Quietgentleman is offline
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Actually Setanta, air just like water will take the path of least resistance. So adding a good outside air source to you old cast iron stove would slow down the heat loss of inside air being used for combustion.

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Old 12-02-2016, 08:24 PM
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CountryGuy CountryGuy is offline
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An idea might be to look into a rocket mass stove. They're to be super efficient and fairly easy to build. So you maximize the amount of wood that is burned and the mass of the design captures the heat to prevent it going up the chimney. Lots of videos on Youtube on them along with info on the web and books to be had. I think you can also incorporate an area for cooking or baking but not sure so you'd need to check that further.
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Old 12-03-2016, 02:55 PM
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Ron,

Lots of thoughts so far .
Here is a really good place to get info about anything to do with heating with wood. I got a really big house and use an OWB( outside wood boiler) to heat the place through zoned in floor radiant heat.

http://www.hearth.com/talk/articles/
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Old 12-08-2016, 02:40 PM
doc doc is offline
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Another source for info:

http://www.wisconsinwoodenergy.org/
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Old 12-15-2016, 02:10 PM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Post OA

Our home is 40 years old +-. The builder and previous owner had a fireplace installed and a 8" thimble in the basement for a stove pipe connection. The fireplace has 2 OA openings which consist of a brick size opening on either side of the fireplace.

We have gas logs installed. But eh old man did but wood in it at one time.

In the basement I run a ussg wood stove epa approved. YEA I've stopped cutting the air off since it creosotes up so bad even with well seasoned wood. Oak ,hickory, cherry.

It will burn good with compressed blocks and really dry firewood. The combustion air for it comes from the room and a craw space opening. The craw space has OA vents.

Even if you have a new gas furnace with a power vent you should install a OA pipe.

Many new furnaces and wood/pellet stoves come with a flue inside a OA pipe to pre warm the in coming air.

Another big hog that draws in OA from every crack is the dryer. Most dryers are 100btu/hr that's a lot of air sucked out of your home.
Second a gas hot water heater.

IMO if you can locate the furnace/stove/hot water heater in a room of their own and then install OA make-up you'd be farther a head.

The craw space, I removed the fiberglass insulation, took down the 3 /6" duct runs , ran new ones insulated, and had closed cell foam 2" blown onto the floor between the joist and the foundation sill area sprayed to seal it up.
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Old 12-16-2016, 12:38 AM
Mad_Professor Mad_Professor is offline
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I think OA and EPA stoves are going a bit too far.............a good air tight stove and proper chimney/flue is all you need.

I heat the house with an old warner made out of 700 lbs of boilerplate steel. It will take 26" chunks a foot across and it heats the house a whole day in freezing weather on one good load topped onto a pile of coals. It's getting close to zero outside now with a strong wind, and it's balmy in the living room, the far reaches of the house are all close to 70 oF. The stove is not running close to capacity but is burning very clean.

No creosote problems, even when I choke it down, and I have to unless it gets real cold. I cleaned the flue after a years worth of fires and collected about 1/2 gallon of debris including the stuff that had already fallen into the clean out. I burn hardwood that has been cut split and covered > 1 year.

The stove uses an existing fireplace hearth and chimney, fitted with an insulated stainless steel flue liner matched to the stove. Draft is excellent and stove can be totally controlled with the simple single screw type air inlet. The flue has a damper but I've only used it when I disconnect the stove for cleaning to prevent loss of inside air up the chimney.
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Old 02-08-2017, 07:15 PM
paul wheaton paul wheaton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryGuy View Post
An idea might be to look into a rocket mass stove. They're to be super efficient and fairly easy to build. So you maximize the amount of wood that is burned and the mass of the design captures the heat to prevent it going up the chimney. Lots of videos on Youtube on them along with info on the web and books to be had. I think you can also incorporate an area for cooking or baking but not sure so you'd need to check that further.
I rigged up the rocket mass heater in my office to use outside air, or not. In the end, I plugged up the outside air intake. It might make my system 4% less efficient, but I like the fresher indoor air.
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