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Old 12-20-2016, 03:52 PM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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Default Removing astringency from fruit and berries

Hi there, I've been wondering if any of you have a good tip for removing astringency from tannin-high fruit and berries. Would soaking/cooking help?
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Old 12-20-2016, 04:01 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Originally Posted by SmallFlocksMom View Post
Hi there, I've been wondering if any of you have a good tip for removing astringency from tannin-high fruit and berries. Would soaking/cooking help?
Well, soaking removes tannin from crushed acorns.

What fruits and berries were you thinking of?
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Old 12-22-2016, 09:11 AM
SmallFlocksMom Female SmallFlocksMom is offline
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Originally Posted by Terri View Post
Well, soaking removes tannin from crushed acorns.

What fruits and berries were you thinking of?
Persimmons and myrtle berries, mainly. We've got plenty of myrtle berries here, but they tend to be somewhat astringent. Cooking helps, but it's not a perfect solution. I might try pre-soaking. Thanks!!
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Old 12-22-2016, 06:10 PM
Terri Terri is online now
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Originally Posted by SmallFlocksMom View Post
Persimmons and myrtle berries, mainly. We've got plenty of myrtle berries here, but they tend to be somewhat astringent. Cooking helps, but it's not a perfect solution. I might try pre-soaking. Thanks!!
I have no experience with either, alas!

Have you tried setting the persimmons on the counter until they are dead ripe? I know the unripe ones do not taste good!
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Old 12-22-2016, 09:15 PM
Bones Bones is offline
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Maybe try soaking the berries in water that has Ascorbic acid (vitamin C, lemon juice) added to it.

To avoid serious persimmon-pucker, there seems to be only two choices: eat them very ripe, or try this trick from a United States Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin of 1915:
“Since heat makes the astringency of the persimmon more apparent, it is always well to add one-half teaspoonful of baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) to each cupful of persimmon pulp in all recipes where the fruit is subjected to heat. Although it has been proved by experiment that the soda may be omitted if the fruit is entirely free from astringency, it is better to use it until one is sure of the quality of the persimmon pulp.”

Other hints are here http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2007/10/...ersimmons.html
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Old 12-23-2016, 12:11 PM
MichaelK Male MichaelK is offline
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I believe the Japanese have a long tradition of drying their persimmons, specifically to get rid of astringency. I'd focus on dried persimmon recipes.
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