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  #1  
Old 01-21-2017, 09:28 AM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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Default $800

Veterinary care is now only for the wealthy in this small town. Yesterday my neighbor told me about her friend who was charged $800 to have her 3 medium sized dogs fixed. That's outrageous.

When I called the vet to ask about an office visit and basic blood test, they told me it would be $140 to start and go up from there.

I've been up all night watching my 8 year old cat as his life slips away. He's on the floor on a blanket, pupils fixed and dilated. This was preventable, I just didn't know that there was something I could have been doing all along.

There is a liquid that is tasteless, odorless, homeopathic and affordable that is added to their water and it helps prevent urinary tract infections that male cats are so prone to. My younger cat will be getting it for the rest of his life. The 8 year old has the symptoms of a blockage. Surgery and after care could run $3,000 dollars.

I had no idea boy cats needed special care. My girl cats lived to be 16 and 19 without incident.

I read about one woman who fed her cat freshly ground mouse every day. She said he was thriving and that he ate 1.5 pounds of ground mouse per week. Just the thought of it makes me nauseous.

I think that these cats are the last animals I'll ever have.

How many pets do you have? How much are you willing to spend? When is enough enough?
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  #2  
Old 01-21-2017, 05:14 PM
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backlash Male backlash is offline
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1.5 pounds of mouse a week!
That woman has a mouse problem.
I have spent way too much on stray animals but I will not let them suffer if I can help.
There was an outside cat that got hurt.
Had a big patch of hide ripped back.
$300 to fix that. Then he came around with an eye hanging out of the socket.
$500 to fix it but I just couldn't spend that much on a cat I saw a couple times a week so I paid to have him put down.
We have a cat that my wife found with both eyes infected.
We took care of that one and she now lives inside.
I have $800 invested in her.

$800 to fix 3 dogs is outrages.
Look for some place that offers free or reduced spay and neutering.
I shopped around for a vet and found one that is about the half priced of the old one.

Sorry to hear about your cat.
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  #3  
Old 01-21-2017, 06:15 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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I have a friend who's a former vet tech. She's retired now and I'm hoping she'll decide to become the middleman for people like me. She knows a lot and was very supportive during my struggle to help my cat. He died today.

She might not be able to get the blue juice (for euthanasia), but maybe there's something she could use to put a terminally ill dog or cat in a deep sleep. My boy suffered even though I was doing everything I could to help him.

That $800 vet bill was paid by the owner. She should have contested it.
But, she's well known here, so making a fuss is bad for her reputation.
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  #4  
Old 01-21-2017, 09:25 PM
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Mesquite_Bean Mesquite_Bean is offline
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I'm not sure where in Texas you are but we've almost always have used mobile vets where ever we've lived.

https://spayneuternet.org They are in and around the metroplex.

Both the feed stores in town have vax clinics frequently too. $10.

Our pyrs we did take to actual brick and mortar vet because the breed in general doesnt do too well with anaesthesia. It was less than $300 to get both our boys done.
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  #5  
Old 01-21-2017, 10:49 PM
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Jjr Male Jjr is offline
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Default Veterinarians have expenses too.....

The average Veterinarian has about $200,000 invested in their education, before they can even apply for their licenses. Then equipment, supplies, etc are required before they can began receiving any return on their investment.

Now for comparison:
I had to have a new natural gas line pressure tested, before the utility company would connect the meter to the line. $145.00 for about thirty minutes. A bicycle hand air pump with a pressure gauge attached, a couple of fittings, then once 15 PSI was achieved a spray bottle with a soap solution to spray each fitting checking for leaks (air bubbles). There were no leaks, but being outside the city limits saved me an addition $105, because I was told the service inside the city limits would have been $250 minimum.

I can assure you that the average plumbers do not have $20,000 (most probably the majority have less than $2,000) invested in their career choice before they can apply for their licenses, much less $200,000 Plus.

Just something to consider before you criticise another Veterinarians invoice.

Would you care to ask, how I know?
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  #6  
Old 01-21-2017, 10:55 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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No mobile vets here. I'm in south central Texas in a small town that requires a car in order to get around. No car, you're screwed.

My remaining cat is a former stray. He watched me for a long time before he decided I was the mama he wanted. I wouldn't let him come in until he was checked out because I already had a dog and cat. I called animal control and they took him to the shelter where he was examined, wormed, fixed, vaccinated and micro chipped along with having the tip of his left ear clipped. My cost: $0. He was ecstatic when they brought him back. He's been an indoor cat ever since.

There are low cost vax clinics here too, mostly on the weekends and in locations I can't get to. I'm moving back to the city. Rural living is highly overrated.
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Old 01-21-2017, 11:35 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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Jjr, there's no competition here, so it's easy for providers of any service to charge the maximum and usually get it. The pipe below my water meter sprung a tiny leak and because I rent, the landlord had to pay the plumber $700. Ouch!

There are things vets do that really anger me. Should a client get free or greatly reduced goods and services because that person and the vet attend the same church?

Why was I charged, years ago, $90 to euthanize a 7# cat? It was because I work hard at keeping my animals healthy and out of the vet's office. They didn't see me very often, but when they did, I got charged a lot more than a person who went in every 6 months. That's why prices for goods and services are not posted any more.

The last time I took my cat to the vet it was because he was unable to eat or drink but he really wanted to. This was a few years ago, I still had my car back then. The vet started off with the need for xrays, then blood work, and on and on. I kept refusing, telling her I wanted to try a simple fix first, if possible, and work our way up the price chart if necessary. She recommended Care Credit to cover the cost of the tests. I refused. Finally she suggests I give the cat half a tablet of Pepcid A/C. Generic was fine. I paid 99 for the Pepcid at Walmart and one dose is all it took. Cat cured. But I had a $60 office visit to pay for, so I came home, gathered up some special things and sold them for the money to pay the vet. I believe the vet knew the Pepcid would work at the beginning of the exam, but just couldn't resist the chance to earn a little extra money at my expense.

The people who suffer are the elderly who are on very tight budgets and are very attached to little Sugar or Tommy.

Veterinary care has become quite a racket here. There will never be a low cost clinic here. They've got a good thing going and they know it.

What I do now is refer to my cherished copy of Dr. Pitcairn's book and use herbal and homeopathic remedies when I can. They work, they're affordable and Dr. Pitcairn's book explains everything in a balanced, complete and detailed way. Here's a link, the next edition is coming out soon.

http://www.drpitcairn.com/books/dr-p...omplete-guide/

One reason I'm so anxious to get back to the city is that there are 2 highly regarded holistic vets there. I took one of my dogs to see one a long time ago and what a difference!

Last edited by SKB; 01-21-2017 at 11:42 PM. Reason: addition
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  #8  
Old 01-22-2017, 04:47 AM
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Jjr Male Jjr is offline
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I completely understand the high cost of living, products & services. I have also heard the fixed income theory relating most usually to the elderly at least retired individuals my entire life. I have also lived on a fixed income my entire life, and certainly did not receive an automatic pay adjustment annually. I did not even keep up with inflation some years, and if one is not keeping up with inflation, they are loosing purchasing power. I was not a pauper, and in later years my income was to become more in align with comparable work at other establishments and I guess to some degree I was rewarded for continuous and faithful service during those bleak years as well. But even then I was not provided an elevated salary way beyond other similar employees income. Actually it is a minority of workers that do not live on a fixed income.

All business have a fixed cost of doing business, and that cost will vary from one business to another, even sometimes from month to month for a single business.

I have a daughter who is a Veterinarian. After being in the Vets "rat race" for a few years, she left the private practice. She did not have any benefits, other than those she paid for out of her own income. She averaged about $45,000 per year in round numbers. She worked 5 1/2 days each week, and was on call 24-7 for emergency cases. If she didn't work, she had no income, so there was no such thing as a vacation. After paying expenses, (student loans was a big expense for her and it still is) she was virtually broke every month, just having a burger & fries was a luxury. We payed for her college expenses, up until the time she entered Veterinary School, but we did not have the income to pay those expenses, so she was forced to take out student loans, if she wanted to be a DVM.

Her education and degree is a requirement for her current employment, but she just about doubled her income, earns annual leave and sick leave and can occasionally enjoy a nice meal at a restaurant without feeling guilty about squandering her little income. And she no longer has to explain to angry clients about their outrageous Vet bill.

She has never had a new vehicle in her life. We have furnished her transportation (one was a used vehicle bought specifically for her, others were cast offs we were driving, knowing their history and life rather than purchasing something unknown for her, and purchasing a new one for ourselves, when it was evident she was going to have to have something else for transportation or spend a fortune reconditioning what she was driving), and we also paid her auto insurance through late 2015. What she was driving was going to have to be replace, and she purchased an EIGHT YEAR OLD vehicle herself about October 2015.

We have had our own ups & downs with our pets. They become family and it hurts when one is injured, sick or just reaches that end of road for their life. Been there and done it all, and it most definitely hurts personally and sometimes financially too, but we protect and care for those not capable of doing so for themselves, and that includes our pets, at least to the point we are financially able to do so. There may be a time when we can not.

The boys Beagle would lay stretched out on her back sun bathing her stomach, and later in life she was diagnosed with Stomach Cancer. She had surgery once and it came back. Although she did not complain, it was obvious she was in pain and the Vet gave her no hope so we had to have her put down. Our German Shepherds hips began to give way in their advanced years and they had to also be put down when they could no longer stand and walk, but I am on my fourth one now. I keep getting another one.

An old cat we had, had for years who had been neutered when young and he did not roam was shot by someone for the pure HELL of it. Shot completely through & through the thoracic area at an angle but he survived. He was severely dehydrated when he came in. It was $300 just to try and build him up with fluids, and the Vet gave him at most a 50/50 chance of surviving the night. Then if he survived the night and strengthened enough for surgery it would be another $500 for the surgery. We gave him the benefit of doubt and he survived and lived another couple of years, but had he not been shot, he very likely would have lived a number of more years. Was he worth $800+? No, not really, but he was family so we tried to take care of him.
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Old 01-22-2017, 06:55 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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If you are near a vet school, you can sometimes get reduced price care. Of course, your animals are being used for training...but supervised training. We seldom deal with vets except for spaying/neutering and rabies vaccinations (it is illegal in Alaska to do your own rabies vaccines). My wife and I operated a veterinary clinic in rural Alaska for 3 years, and learned a lot there. The vet only visited once a month, so we handled a lot of stuff. If we had questions, we could call and get meds and such shipped to us. All the surgery was lined up for the monthly vet visit. We also had sled dogs and livestock for 25 years, so we learned to do all but major surgery. the market for small animal veterinarians is pretty well saturated in many areas, but finding a large animal vet is nearly impossible in some areas. The saturated areas don't have the patient volume to support all the vets, so they have to charge more to cover their overhead--it is not always a shortage that causes high prices. I don't know if it is still in place, but the University of Washington had full ride scholarships available for folks with bachelors degrees who agreed to work with large animals for 5 years after graduation since almost all the large animal vets were old men who were nearing retirement. Overhead is most likely the cause of high prices.
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  #10  
Old 01-22-2017, 01:24 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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Doninalaska, lack of reliable transportation is a huge obstacle. Finding a ride can be challenging because many people don't want an animal in their vehicle.

There are 5 veterinary clinics in this county of approximately 60,000 people. The population of the city is just under 8,000 and we have 2 vet clinics here. Both are too far away to walk to. No saturation here.

I recently bought 3 small cans (3 oz each) of Merrick cat food for my 16# cat to try. He likes it and it's very good quality, so I'll be buying more. $1.39 a can is high, but cooking for him wouldn't be any cheaper. He's worth it and it will hopefully keep him out of the vet's office.

I read the reviews for alternative pet products on Chewy.com and Amazon and owners consistently mention that they went the conventional route first, spending a lot of money and getting little or no results. Then they try an herbal or homeopathic remedy and see an improvement in a short time and it didn't break the bank, so they are thrilled and telling everyone they can. That really helps me.

Animals can't fake it. Either something works or it doesn't. I've used goldenseal externally to eliminate an eye infection in both a dog and a cat. The directions are in Dr. Pitcairn's book. The infection was gone in 2 days in both animals. They didn't fight me, they weren't stressed and I had the capsules in the cupboard. Win/win.

I think vets are for those who just don't have the time or interest to deal with an animal's problem (emergencies excluded). Here doc, fix it.

When it comes to emergencies, I'm learning that I can do more than I thought. My cat was dying yesterday, but I wasn't thinking clearly enough to remember I had some Arsenicum Album 30C in the closet and it would have helped ease him in transitioning. Instead, I held him, rocked him and talked to him. Now I know there's more I could have done. I've used the remedy for other things which is why it didn't click in my head to see if I had anything that would have helped. That's one of the downsides of living alone.

Anyway, I m planning to get some Tarentula Cubensis 30C (for an animal dying from a severe infection) as another end of life remedy. Every animal and situation is different, and living around elderly people with pets, if I don't need it, someone else might.

Pulsatilla 30C is also an end of life remedy I want to have on hand. 80 pellets go a long way and for less than $7 a tube, a bargain. These are multi use remedies, it's the application/strength that makes the difference. Thank God for Dr. Pitcairn!!
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Old 01-22-2017, 01:57 PM
Setanta Male Setanta is offline
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Cost me $700+ to have my dog worked on by a vet after my neighbors pitbull tore into him. then another $500 to fix a couple other problems a few weeks later. while there I asked how much to have a cat fixed, $290 each. fortunately male cats rarely wander by my place so they don't have a lot of kittens (1 kitten born and that's it). I have had male cats with urinary tract problems, I literally had to squeeze the piss out of him (he was only a year old). I put him on a special diet catfood that helped, most of the problems come from feeding cheaper dry food. the more expensive stuff was better for him, but he was hit by a car at 2 and a half. the next cat lived to be 6 months before being hit by a car, then I had another who never liked me and I gave him to a group that organized fixing feral cats for free at local vets and releasing to the wild(was a feral who marked territory in my tool shed).

had some sick chickens this year, just lopped their heads off to make it quick, not going to spend a cent to save a sick chicken. cats only if its practical. and the dog only if its practical (how long could they live if treated, cats get grabbed by coyote and owls so often and hit by cars I loose them before they are 2 years old most of the time, so I don't put much money into them), the dog is already older but could easily live another 4 years, so he was worth the investment.
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Old 01-22-2017, 02:18 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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There's definitely a difference in how city folks treat animals vs. how country folks do it.

I grew up in a small city, so taking an animal to the vet was all I knew.

Now I'm in a rural area and one neighbor lets her cats run loose. When the landlord put out rat poison, I warned her. She shrugged.

I have a friend who grew up on a farm. Her dog got run over, and the dog's pelvis was crushed so she shot her. Never for a moment did she consider doing anything else. Very brave woman.

The last dog I had was rescued, along with his sister, while a tiny pup. The story that circulated was that their mama had been hit by a car and when a local cop saw her, she was bleeding but rather than transport her to a vet and mess up his car, he shot her. The pups were later found hiding under a nearby house.
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Old 01-23-2017, 06:12 AM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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[QUOTE=SKB;430079]


Animals can't fake it. Either something works or it doesn't. I've used goldenseal externally to eliminate an eye infection in both a dog and a cat. The directions are in Dr. Pitcairn's book. The infection was gone in 2 days in both animals. They didn't fight me, they weren't stressed and I had the capsules in the cupboard. Win/win.

I think vets are for those who just don't have the time or interest to deal with an animal's problem (emergencies excluded). Here doc, fix it.

/QUOTE]

We once saved a goat with a frank udder infection using Echinacea and Goldenseal, but we gave it internally. We may have also used it externally...I just don't remember. She was a wonderful animal, and she lost half her udder, but went on to lead a full and productive life for another 7 or 8 years.
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Old 01-23-2017, 12:23 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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It's just amazing what herbs can do. I think that overall, pharmaceuticals have done more harm than good.

The recent news story of the woman who died because her infection was resistant to every antibiotic known to man was sad and frightening. I wonder if an herbalist could have helped her. Or a good dose of raw garlic. Geeze, there has to be a Plan B.
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Old 01-23-2017, 10:55 PM
SKB Female SKB is offline
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Today I learned that there is a vet who will do in home euthanasia, so I called to get information. To euthanize my 7# cat would have cost $300
and depending on the type of cremation services I wanted, another $300-525 would be added to the bill.

Clearly not an option for me.
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2017, 04:56 PM
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What a ripoff. I always wished I had been a vet.

Living in suburban Chicago with plenty of competition among the vets, ours charged $25 to put down an old, suffering German Shepard.

Once we had to put down a mini horse with colic. Several hundred bucks for 24 hrs of care at their facility before it became apparent that further efforts would be futile. Then they wanted another $500 for "disposal." I told 'em to load the carcass on my truck.

It took me about an hour to dig a six foot hole. Good exercise.
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