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Tractors Big ones, small ones, old ones, new ones, buying, using, fixing...you get the idea.

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Old 07-02-2017, 12:50 AM
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Default What did you grow up with?

Since many here have tractors, raise gardens and strive to live an independent & self-sustaining life style as much as possible, I thought it would be interesting to tell about what farm & garden equipment the various members grew up with? (To reply to this thread, draft animals, hand tools and/or tillers should be acceptable, I hope!)
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Old 07-02-2017, 03:00 AM
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Grandpa had a Ford 9N.
I used to love to drive that thing.
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Old 07-02-2017, 03:21 AM
mozarkian mozarkian is offline
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Does an old bay draft horse named Bill with a plow, disk and homemade drag count? We had him till I was about 7 then dad sold him and bought a cub tractor with cultivators.
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Old 07-02-2017, 04:08 AM
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1. An 8N
2. A wood box wheat drill I rode and worked while dad drive the ford
3. A dump rake once again that had a foot release to dump. We made rows for uncle Williards square bailer.
4. A corn planter - something I rode and worked he drove tractor .
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Old 07-02-2017, 04:31 AM
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I grew up in Chicago. Great grandpa & grandpa had an empty lot next to the house. In Chicago, an empty lot is euphemistically called a "prairie." They grew tomatoes and zucchini using the usual hand tools: fork, shovel, hoe & rake.

In those days, we still had a fruit & vegetable guy and a rags & iron guy who came down the alley weekly with their horse drawn carts. My job was to use the coal shovel to scoop up the road apples left in the alley to save as fertilizer.
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Old 07-02-2017, 05:24 PM
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Dad plowed with a mule for the first few years I can remember. When the old mule died, dad purchased a tiller, something fairly new on the market then. We had a garden for the typical vegetables, and a "patch" (roughly five acres) as it was referred to for the running viney things which required more space like cantaloupes, water melons, cucumbers as well as field corn & peas. In the fall collard, mustard and turnip greens would also be planted in the patch.

It was quickly realized the little tiller was not capable of handling the garden, roughly one acre itself, much less the patch, so dad went to looking for something else. He found a used David Bradley two wheel walking tractor for sale with several implements which he purchased. The attachments included a trailer, middle buster, turning plow & cultivators for gardening use. There was also a dirt blade, sickle mower & set of disks, which were all of questionable value, but they were included in the purchase. The David Bradley was an excellent tractor and served many years, before it was retired and dad purchased a slightly used International Harvester 140 Tractor. For anyone not familiar with the International Harvester Tractors the IH-A, IH-Super A, IH-140 was the progression of the Cubs bigger brother. I was in college at that time, but in the following years I used the 140 to mow and work the gardens when I was at home.

The 140 served dad well, but in 1987 he purchased a new Kubota L245H which was basically a 140 only in diesel and made by a different company. All the 140's equipment would attach to and work from the L245H Kubota. Dad offered me the 140, but at the time I didn't need it, or have enough property to make it feasible, so he sold the 140. Inflation had made the 140 more valuable during the years of his ownership and he got nearly twice the original investment in the little tractor back when it was sold, plus all the years of its utility.

I restored the old David Bradley in the mid-90's, and although it is not used much these days I still have it and all of its equipment. Dad is now gone, but I also have his Kubota L245H and the equipment.
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Old 07-02-2017, 09:31 PM
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Gravely tractor. Bush hog and rotary plow.

Still got one.
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Old 07-06-2017, 04:46 PM
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Default WD9 Tractor

Thing was like a tank to drive. I used to have to stand on the clutch pedal to make it work.
One time pulling a cultivator I hooked a huge flat rock that was just under the surface, picked up the whole tractor (and scared the beejeesers out of me!)
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Old 07-07-2017, 12:23 AM
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As early as I can remember until I graduated high school.... I and most of the family bled bright green.

We had all other colors as well, but mostly green.
My Grandpa had a line of retired tractors in the shelter belt that started with a steam Case, Rumley Oil Pull, all manor of John Deer A, B, G, D, R, and lastly the big 830s.. We also had a Ford 9 or 2N (war time) VC(?) Case, Allis Chalmers, and a number of early Farmall models.

My crazy uncles got all there buddies to buy a Farmall M, H, or C.. A John Deere A or B.. What ever was available on the veterans preference. Then they bought the tractors from them.
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Old 07-07-2017, 02:56 AM
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Tim,
Before I started school ( guess it was around 1949'or 50) . We moved from one farm to another. From Dad's side of family home place to Mom's. Sides Home place. That move was first memory I have . We move on flatbed farm wagons -and I can remember riding on Uncle Willards JD B - put put all the way.

Mo
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Old 07-07-2017, 06:49 PM
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Both Grand Dads were North Carolina tobacco farmers. (Backer for those us from the South). One farmed with horse and mules and never did upgrade right up through the 60s. Other Grand Dad share cropped quite a bit of land for an old lady who had money. Every two years she'd buy him a new Allis Chalmers tractor. She was good to the family. I have a 1946 Ford 2N. Had it 11 years and have spent less than $1000 keeping it running (including a $500 rear tire). It shreds, plows, grades, etc. for what I need. It does have too fast a ground speed to run a rototiller unfortunately. Needs to find a Howard transmission for it.
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Old 07-08-2017, 11:00 AM
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The first two tractors I drove were an Allis Chalmers D14, not sure of the age, and in 63 or 64 my dad bought a new 3020 John Deere diesel. I loved the power steering on the JD because most of my summer was spent driving wagons back and forth from the fields where we chopped alfalfa and put it in pit silos. It wasn't bad when you could drive straight through, dump, and go back out for another wagon. But there were times you had to back the wagon into the pit silo to dump, and the wagons were 4 wheel wagons which are always interesting to back a long ways. I always thought the hundreds of wagons I had to back in made me better later in life when it came to backing in boat trailers or horse trailers.

I still have both of those tractors today.
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:10 PM
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Well, since I grew up in a row house neighborhood in NE Philly, I grew up with stick ball in the street, using just about anything for the ball, and football (sometimes tackle) in those same streets when in season. Didn't buy my first tractor until well over 60 (a Branson 3510i), but in an earlier "back to the land" move in 75, I bought a troybilt 6HP tiller which I used for many years in backyard gardens in several locations. It too held it's value and I sold it in about 91 for about what I paid for it. Well I guess counting the inflation during all those years, it wasn't really near what I paid for it, but still a nice chunk of cash.

JVC
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