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Old 07-07-2017, 09:58 AM
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I don't own any guns and have only rudimentary knowledge about them. But now that I've got 40 ac with frequent visits by deer, turkeys and varmints, what firearms would the experts here recommend to get me started?
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Old 07-07-2017, 05:13 PM
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My opinion is the best farm gun is a 12 gauge pump (Mossberg Flex 500 is about ($419) that accepts the 3" shells. Can handle any game and any 2 legged intruders. A wide range of ammo is readily available at reasonable cost from any major sports store or Wally World. Easy to use and easy to clean. I collect guns and the only other option I would recommend if you can't afford a pump is a New England Arms 12 gauge single shot Pardner model ($177), with a modified choke barrel. If money allows also purchase a Chiappa Firearms X-caliber set of barrel adapters ($226), that fit inside the barrel of the Pardner shotgun that allows you to shoot 12 different caliber shells. It has 8 steel adapters, can fire up to 12 different calibers : 8 pistol calibers ( .380 , 9 mm
, .357Mag/.38SP , .40 S & W, .44 Mag, .45 ACP , .410/.45colt ) and two shotgun calibers (410 ga, 20ga).
Hope that helps.
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Old 07-07-2017, 06:18 PM
Doninalaska Doninalaska is offline
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My opinion is the best farm gun is a 12 gauge pump (Mossberg Flex 500 is about ($419) that accepts the 3" shells. Can handle any game and any 2 legged intruders. A wide range of ammo is readily available at reasonable cost from any major sports store or Wally World. Easy to use and easy to clean. I collect guns and the only other option I would recommend if you can't afford a pump is a New England Arms 12 gauge single shot Pardner model ($177), with a modified choke barrel. If money allows also purchase a Chiappa Firearms X-caliber set of barrel adapters ($226), that fit inside the barrel of the Pardner shotgun that allows you to shoot 12 different caliber shells. It has 8 steel adapters, can fire up to 12 different calibers : 8 pistol calibers ( .380 , 9 mm
, .357Mag/.38SP , .40 S & W, .44 Mag, .45 ACP , .410/.45colt ) and two shotgun calibers (410 ga, 20ga).
Hope that helps.
Doesn't that Mossberg also have a rifled barrel available for slugs at longer ranges? Are rifles legal for hunting in your area of Wisconsin? We always used small-caliber centerfire rifles for varmits such as woodchucks when I lived in the lower 48 (.223, .243, or sometimes .270) simply because we made some long shots. I am no expert, however, so there are many others including 1gman who know more than I do. I just threw in my 2 cents, as Tim Horton says....
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Old 07-07-2017, 08:45 PM
MtnManJim Male MtnManJim is offline
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Wow! That’s kind of a wide open question, doc.For answers, you could get hundreds of different opinions, and probably about 98% of them would be right.Or at least not entirely wrong.I’ll take a “shot” at answering you though.
First off, living “out in the country,” I wouldn’t want to be without a .22 rimfire rifle of some kind. And for a .22 rimfire, I lean heavily (make that “absolutely”) towards a .22 Long Rifle.Note – “.22 Long Rifle” is the name of the cartridge.The gun that fires it doesn’t necessarily have to be a rifle.There are millions of .22 Long Rifle handguns out there.And “rimfire” means the cartridge’s priming compound (the stuff that lights off the gunpowder) is in the cartridge’s rim, unlike a “centerfire” cartridge where the primer is in the middle of the cartridge’s base.
Also unlike centerfire cartridges, it’s nigh on impossible for the average shooter to reload (handload) rimfire cartridges. That was a big problem a couple of years ago because there was a huge ammunition shortage.And rimfire ammunition was especially affected.I would only be my opinions if I stated the reasons behind the shortage, so I won’t.Besides, for the most part the shortage is over now, and you can once again find inexpensive .22 rimfire ammunition in almost every store that sells ammunition.
At any rate, a scoped, .22 Long Rifle, rifle of some kind is good for small varmints up to the size of skunks and foxes. You can kill coyotes with a .22 Long Rifle, if they are close, and if you can always shoot them between the eyes or behind an ear, but I wouldn’t try it.It’s inhumane to shoot animals with cartridges that are not powerful enough to cause nearly instantaneous death.And a coyote shot in the lungs with a .22 Long Rifle could go a long, long ways before he finally expired.
As far as .22 Long Rifle rifles are concerned, I favor Ruger 10-22s. They’re reliable, accurate enough, and not overly pricey.Besides, if you really get into it, there are hundreds of accessories for Ruger 10-22s.They’re real Barbie Dolls.I have one I’ve “personalized,” and I’m working on another.
Okay, next up is a centerfire rifle for deer and large varmints. Doc, you’ve got to check with your State’s Department of Fish and Game on this.I don’t know what cartridges are legal for hunting big game such as deer where you are, but I guarantee there are rules and regulations about it.Even the before mentioned .22 Long Rifle is legal for big game hunting in some (relatively rare) locals, but I’ll bet it’s not where you are.
That said, if, and only if it’s legal, I’d recommend a 243 Winchester -“243 Winchester” being the name of the cartridge, not necessarily a Winchester rifle. Most people just call them “two-forty-threes.”But technically they are 243 Winchesters.It’s the same as most people just say “thirty-aught-six” when they’re talking about 30-06 Springfield cartridges.I have an old thirty-aught-six (30-06 Springfield) myself, but it’s a Ruger.My buddy has a 30-06 Springfield, but it’s a Remington.Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think the Springfield Rifle Company is even in business anymore.
By the way, a plain old 30-06 is a good choice for hunting any big game, anywhere in the lower 48. The only reason I’m not recommending a 30-06 (thirty-aught-six) of some brand for you is because you said you’re new to guns and hunting.30-06s kick relatively hard, and that kick can cause an inexperienced shooter to develop a flinch.
Anyway, back to the 243. A 243 Winchester is powerful enough, and flat shooting enough, to humanely kill deer and coyotes out to around 300 yards.It is fast, doesn’t kick very hard, there is a large variety of rifles chambered for it, and 243 Winchester ammo is generally available.
As far as big game rifle brands are concerned, I like Winchesters and Rugers. I like bolt actions, and Leopold or Weaver variable power scopes.There is a lot of opinions about different brand rifles, action types, and scopes of course.And like I said before, 98% of them are right, or at least not entirely wrong.But only my opinion is 100% right. LOL!
As I’ve never hunted turkeys, I don’t know what gun and ammunition to recommend for it. But I’ll guess a 12-gauge shotgun of some kind would be a good choice.Get one with a good recoil pad, and don’t shoot magnum shotgun shells in it until you get used to it.I like semi-automatic shotguns myself, but it’s your choice.
I hope all this helps. If what I wrote was over simplistic, I apologize.I’ve been around guns and hunting my whole life (I’m nearly 70 now) and I just don’t have a real good handle on what hunting newcomers already know or don’t know.
Oh yeah, “Just one more thing” Columbo said – there is at least one glaring exception to that cartridge name not necessarily matching the brand of the rifle it’s fired in thing. Generally speaking, Weatherby cartridges are fired in Weatherby rifles.That is, if someone tells you they have a 7mm Weatherby Magnum, it would be a pretty safe bet they have a Weatherby rifle.That’s entirely different than say, my wife, who has a 7mm Remington magnum.Yet her 7mm Remington magnum is a Winchester rifle.For big game, I shoot a 308 Norma Magnum.But Norma Ammunition Company never built a rifle of their own.My “three-oh-eight Norma” is a custom rifle that I had Montana Rifle Company build for me.
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Old 07-08-2017, 01:34 AM
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Doc, everyone has an opinion: good, bad or indifferent they have one! What works for me may not for you and vice versa.

The standard three guns around the home stead has been the shotgun, .22 long rifle rimfire rifle and a centerfire rifle.

I grew up with the .12 gauge, but I much prefer the .20 today and it is just as effective as the .12, but that is my preference. I also like doubles, but pump actions are all-around great guns too, and the automatics are just as reliable today as any pump gun. If there is a range where you can rent guns, go try out a few. Among the pumps, Remington's 870 & the Mossberg's 500 are two of the best and available in both .12 & 20 gauges. If you are ambidextrous or a lefty then a Browning "BPS" is more in order because it throws the emptied out the bottom. It can also be had in .12 or .20 gauge.

Almost any .22 LR (long rife) caliber rimfire will do. They are available in anything from single shot, bolt action, leaver action, pump & semi-automatic. Leaver actions are only available in the tube feeding variety. Bolt, pump and semi-automatics are available in both tube fed and clip fed, although not each and every individual model is available in both feed designs. The tube feed is a long under barrel tube which has an inner smaller retractable tube with a spring plunger inside itself. The .22 cartridges are loaded through a cut out in the larger outer tube, then the inter tube is pushed down over the cartridges and locked in a notch in the larger tube. The spring provides constant pressure to push the cartridges down into the action. It is strictly a matter of personal preferences, because they all are great little guns! If accuracy is an overriding consideration a bolt action probably has an edge, but the Ruger 10-22 is a great little gun as has already been pointed out. Clip fed guns are probably faster to reload, but at one time in the past there were reloading devices for the tube fed guns, but I am not sure they are still available. If nostalgia is a concern, then the lever action is the style of choice. I would not turn a single one down, if they were free. The Ruger 10-22 probably has more accessories available for it than all the rest which makes it a very desirable gun, and near the top for my choice, but I do like the Ruger 77-22 myself. I don't think you can go wrong with any .22 rimfire you choose, although other may disagree. Again if you can try out a few different styles go for it. Even if you can't test fire them go look over what is out there and see how they feel, how they shoulder and what the sights look like, regardless of plans for a scope when purchased or later. I for one detest a barrel without sights, and have only one without sights, but there will never be another. If something happens to a scope, I want sights until the scope can be replaced. Another preference, but one I feel strongly about, but I digress.

The Centerfire is the trickiest and most touchy of the three, assuming they are legal for hunting in your area. If not find yourself a bolt action .410 on the used market in good condition with rifle sights, over a rifled barrel and use .410 slugs. End of discussion.

If centerfire rifles are legal, most everyone has a favorite caliber, regardless of their owning and using that caliber, it is still their favorite and they want to own it, so they recommend it to everyone. Unless you expect elephants or cape buffalo to suddenly start grazing on you 40 acres, or you plan an African Safari or a trip out west for some extremely long range shooting you don't need a .338 Winchester Magnum, .375 H & H Magnum or a .416 Remington for starters. Now if you want one that is a different story, but they can not kill a white tail any deader than a .243 or .308 Winchester can. There are, however, a lot of other great white tail calibers available: The .257 Roberts, .260 Remington, 6.5X55 Swedish Mauser, 7mm-08, 7mm, 7mm Magnum, Jack O'Conner's all time favorite the .270 Winchester, then the .280, the .30-06 and of course the legendary .30-30 Winchester. All are good choices, but depending on certain factors like range (distance for the shot) to the target, some are better than others. The older I get, the more I prefer the tried and true calibers over the pick of the week variety, which is here today, but possibly not next week. I consider all the new Winchester Short Magnum calibers as part of the pick of the week variety. I had one but did not, especially like it. That was me, you might love one. Again go try out what is available, call friends or acquaintances that might be able to go to the range with you and allow you to test fire their favorite rifle. Ask these same people not only what they like about their guns, but what they dislike, if there are any. Also what gun would they purchase today, if they were starting over. If it is not that same rifle, I would want to know why. I would not recommend the .30-30 Winchester although there is absolutely nothing wrong with the old round. Availability is something else I look at as I have aged, and those middle of the road calibers that have a proven track record of half a century or more are the ones I would recommend, and the old .30-30 certainly fits in with the last statement, but it is no longer available in a bolt action rifle, although one might be found on the used market. Bolt action rifles dominate the centerfire market and a quality bolt action would be the beginning of my recommendation. They have the strongest actions and provide the greatest accuracy right out of the box. The 6.5x55 SM is a personal favorite of mine, but only CZ offers this chamber today, but it is an excellent offering. The .243, 7mm-08, 308, 7mm & .270 would be the bulk of my core choices, even though someone will point out the 7mm-08 is not quite 50. The .280 & .30-06 are also great cartridges, but another cut for me would be a short action which removes them and the the .270 Winchester. Of the five remaining the .308 Winchester would be the best all around performer for a novice. It also has more choices in manufactured ammo than the rest, which is a definite plus. But I am prejudiced and biased towards the 6.5.x55 and I would probably take it.

There is one other gun I will recommend. One which you can have on you when wandering around and over your 40 acres, and still have hands free for other uses. There are many good handguns, but for out and about a good .357 Magnum revolver would make an excellent companion. It also make a nice companion at night on the bedside table. When things go bump in the night and one is startled awake, there are no safeties to deal with when the adrenaline is flowing swiftly. The .357 Magnum can fire the much cheaper .38 Special cartridges, which are very respectable on their own, but the more powerful .357 Magnum cartridges can also be used in the one handgun, as can shot shell.
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Old 07-08-2017, 08:25 AM
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Wow! A lot of info in a concentrated space. Thanks guys. Now I have a starting point.

I am lefty-- does that limit my choices or are LH models readily available? ("I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous"-- Yogi Berra)

What are the advantages/disadvantages of rim fire vs center fire? Is the difference only in the ammo or is the rifle itself one or the other?

WI apparently has no restrictions on weapons/caliber for deer hunting.
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Old 07-08-2017, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by doc View Post
Wow! A lot of info in a concentrated space. Thanks guys. Now I have a starting point.

I am lefty-- does that limit my choices or are LH models readily available? ("I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous"-- Yogi Berra)

What are the advantages/disadvantages of rim fire vs center fire? Is the difference only in the ammo or is the rifle itself one or the other?

WI apparently has no restrictions on weapons/caliber for deer hunting.
Current rimfires will be small calibers for small game.
All the larger cartridges will be centerfire.

The "ideal" hunting battery would be a 22 rimfire rifle, a centerfire deer rifle and a 12 or 20 GA shotgun for upland birds and waterfowl.

Check your local hunting regulations to see what is legal.
Some states have caliber restrictions for deer, or don't allow rifles for turkeys.

This is a good time of year to buy used guns since sales are slower and dealers will often cut prices more than they will in the Fall.
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:22 PM
MtnManJim Male MtnManJim is offline
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Originally Posted by doc View Post
Wow! A lot of info in a concentrated space. Thanks guys. Now I have a starting point.

I am lefty-- does that limit my choices or are LH models readily available? ("I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous"-- Yogi Berra)

What are the advantages/disadvantages of rim fire vs center fire? Is the difference only in the ammo or is the rifle itself one or the other?

WI apparently has no restrictions on weapons/caliber for deer hunting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1qXl7xkK8Q
There's a pretty good explanation of rimfire versus centerfire ammo at the above link. However, as Bearfootfarm already stated, the only rimfire ammo currently available is small caliber (22 caliber), and it's generally used for small game or small varmints at close range - under 50 yards.
Now that's not to say that all 22 caliber guns are rimfires. The well known AR-15 (the civilian version of the M-16) is a 22 caliber centerfire. The cartridge an AR-15 fires is called a 223 Remington or a 5.56mm NATO. I myself use a 22-250, which is yet another 22 caliber centerfire. A 22-250 is powerful enough, and fast enough, to cleanly take coyotes out to 300 yards or so if I do my job.

Yes, being a lefty limits your choices somewhat. But almost all of the large gun makers, Winchester, Remington, Ruger, etc. offer left-handed versions of their bolt action rifles. With single shot, semi-auto, pump action, or lever action rifles and shotguns, left handed/right handed might not matter as much. "The Rifleman," Chuck Connors was ambidextrous, and you can watch him firing his lever action rifle both ways in his old television shows.

Not to be a wise guy, but asking if there are advantages/disadvantages to rimfires versus centerfires, is like asking if there are advantages/disadvantages to putters versus drivers when it comes to golf clubs - they're used for different things. 22 rimfires are used for small game and small varmints at close range. 22 caliber centerfires on up are used for larger game and varmints at longer ranges. But I'll say it again - I would not want to be without a 22 rimfire, namely a 22 Long Rifle, living out in the country where I do. And if I might make a recommendation - I really think a 22 rimfire (again a 22 Long Rifle) rifle of some kind should be your first firearms purchase.

I checked it out myself, and it seems WI does have caliber restrictions for deer hunting - no rimfires, but you can use centerfires from 22 caliber on up.
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Old 07-09-2017, 12:13 AM
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I am lefty-- does that limit my choices or are LH models readily available? ("I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous"-- Yogi Berra)
Being left handed today is not the hindrance it was in the past. My grandfather was very ambidextrous, and I inherited some of his skills, but I am not as adept with the left hand as he was.

My MIL is a lefty and had a couple of kids who were also left handed, but my wife is not one of them. Guess what? We've got the only left handed grandchild in the family. He also has some ambidexterity ability, but like myself he lacks some skills with the off (right in his case) hand.

Double barrel shotguns can be handled with equal ease by either a left or right handed person, and that is just another reason I like doubles.

Browning also makes an excellent little .22 LR semi-automatic rifle which ejects empties out the bottom and prevents brass flying out the starboard side and across your face. Browning also produces their "T-Bolt Action" rimfire rifle in a left hand version. I believe these are the only two best choices for lefty. Erma made at one time in the past a copy of the Browning semi-automatic, which was a well made gun and Norinco a china company also produced a copy of the Browning, but it was a poor copy and I would not recommend anything but running from it. I am not sure if either of the last two are still being produced.

Left handed Centerfire rifles have already been pretty well gone over so I will stop here.
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Old 07-09-2017, 05:44 PM
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I'm still confused:

You need a Philips head screwdriver to drive a Philips head screw. You can't use a Torx drive tool to drive the Philips head screw.

Do you need a center fire rifle to shoot center fire ammo, or will any 22 rifle shoot any 22 ammo?
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Old 07-09-2017, 07:19 PM
MtnManJim Male MtnManJim is offline
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I'm still confused:

You need a Philips head screwdriver to drive a Philips head screw. You can't use a Torx drive tool to drive the Philips head screw.

Do you need a center fire rifle to shoot center fire ammo, or will any 22 rifle shoot any 22 ammo?
Sorry for the confusion, doc. I'm afraid my posts might be a little overwhelming (too much info) because I'm a bit long-winded.

Yes, you do need a centerfire rifle (or handgun) to shoot centerfire ammo, just like you do need a rimfire rifle (or handgun) to shoot rimfire ammo.

Okay, now for a definition - when we say "22" we're actually talking about the approximate diameter of the bullet a 22 caliber firearm uses, or the approximate diameter of the inside of the barrel (the bore) of a firearm. The following is from the glossary in my Speer Reloading Manual:
"Caliber: The diameter of either a projectile or the bore of a gun. It is the approximate diameter expressed in hundredths of an inch in the English measurement system. A bullet that is 0.451-inch in diameter is a 45-caliber..."

The above definition is why we have "22-caliber" rimfires, as well as "22-caliber centerfires." They both shoot "22-caliber" bullets, which are all approximately .22 hundredths of an inch in diameter, but the cartridges themselves are entirely different.

And while we're on the subject of definitions, because of TV and movies, as well as a great deal of printed media, many people, probably even most people, call cartridges, "bullets." They are not. A cartridge consists of a cartridge case, a primer, some gunpowder, and a bullet. The bullet becomes the "projectile," or the "missile," when it leaves the barrel of the gun.

I only mentioned that because it's important to understand that when we're talking about 22, or 30, or 45, or whatever caliber cartridges or the guns they're fired in, we're technically talking about the diameters of the bullets.

As I said in an earlier post, my varmint rifle is a 22-250 Remington. If I said, "I have a 22 caliber varmint rifle," that would be correct because it does shoot 22 caliber bullets. But that doesn't tell you much about what size or type of varmint rifle I have because there are a lot of rifles and handguns, that have 22 caliber bores, and therefore use 22 caliber bullets.

On the other hand, if I told you, "I have a 22-250 caliber varmint rifle," that would be incorrect, because "caliber" is just the diameter of the bullet, not the whole cartridge. In order to correctly, and better describe my varmint rifle, I would have to say, "I have a Kimber, 22-250 Remington rifle."

Just one more example - earlier I recommended that a 22-rimfire (especially a 22 Long Rifle) rifle should be your first firearms purchase. A "22 Long Rifle" is a rimfire cartridge that fires a 22-caliber bullet. And there are millions of 22 Long Rifle handguns, as well as 22 Long Rifle rifles out there. I recommended a 22 Long Rifle, rifle for your first gun.

I hope this helps.
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Old 07-10-2017, 03:44 AM
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Don't know the terrain of your 40ac, but if it's anything like mine in MN - mixed forest, with a lot of cover, with most shots within 50 yards:

12ga. Pump. Two barrels - one that you can choose chokes, and a rifled slug barrel.

Done.

I am also left handed, have had problems with some semi-autos, but never a pump. Worst thing is the safety. Mossy works pretty good, for us Lefties.
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Old 08-08-2017, 06:38 PM
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All you need for the game you mentioned are;

Deer -

A lever action .30/30 such as a Winchester model 94, or a Marlin model 336. Both are south paw friendly, but they will eject on the right, which isn't really a big issue. Or;

A left handed bolt action rifle. Most of the big name companies offer at least some of their line in a left handed model. The choice in caliber will be a bit more limited as compared to a right handed gun, but the main calibers such as .308, .30/06, .270 are usually offered. Or;

A pump shotgun using slugs or buckshot is also a good choice, albeit a short range weapon. Again will eject on the right. Find an Ithaca Deer Slayer and you'll have a nice downward ejecting left hand friendly weapon.

Turkey -

A shotgun of some sort, whether single shot, pump, double barrel, or semi-auto. All but the single shot and double barrel will still eject on the right (unless you can find an old Ithaca shotgun which ejects out of the same hole you load it from, downward).


Varmints;

.22 rimfire

either single shot, lever, pump or bolt. If bolt, again look for a lefty bolt model if you can.

Small caliber centerfire, such as a .223 or similar. Sam criteria as above.


Don't let people tell you to adapt. They're only saying "adapt" because they will be speaking from a resale standpoint. I don't know about the next guy, but I buy guns for the long term. My decision to purchase is never based on a potential resale. So when I buy, I buy what fits me, and I always buy left handed if I can. I will spend extra to get what fits me. I don't buy clothing that doesn't fit me and try to adapt, and I don't buy guns that way either. Besides, a left handed gun will sell, in some cases just as quickly as a wrong handed gun.

Now of course there are some guns that you can't buy left handed, example, and AK47. Doesn't mean a lefty can't shoot one, but I'm sure some day somebody will offer a lefty version. And when they do I'll be first in line to get one. I already have a left handed AR 15(left handed upper anyway), its only a matter of time until some enterprising individual comes up with a left handed AK.

Last edited by Nickathome; 08-08-2017 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 08-12-2017, 02:37 AM
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I am also left handed, have had problems with some semi-autos, but never a pump. Worst thing is the safety. Mossy works pretty good, for us Lefties.
If you are still checking this thread doc, to add a little more to what was previously stated.

The newer Mossberg and Browning pumps are equipped with a tang safety which is operated with the thumb. Remington still has the safety located in the back of the trigger guard, but they do offer a "left hand" version (Port side ejection of the empties), as does Mossberg.

Remington also makes a left hand version of their semi-automatic shotgun, but Browning and Mossberg do not, I believe. Winchester has been such an, on-again/off-again, brand in recent years, I have no idea what its offering contain regarding "left hand" versions.
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Jjr View Post
If you are still checking this thread doc, to add a little more to what was previously stated.

The newer Mossberg and Browning pumps are equipped with a tang safety which is operated with the thumb. Remington still has the safety located in the back of the trigger guard, but they do offer a "left hand" version (Port side ejection of the empties), as does Mossberg.

Remington also makes a left hand version of their semi-automatic shotgun, but Browning and Mossberg do not, I believe. Winchester has been such an, on-again/off-again, brand in recent years, I have no idea what its offering contain regarding "left hand" versions.
Mossberg has been using a tang safety on their pumps for quite a long time. This is not a new thing with them. I've got a model 500 that is at least 35 years old, and it has a tang safety.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:24 PM
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like the first post said. a 12 gauge shot gun will Absulutely cover everything you will hunt, or dispatch. You would just have to change the shot size. 00 bucket for two legged or four legged that size. #4,,5,6 for rabbit and upland. #7,8 for practice. also bird. the best kill range is between pitcher mound and second base. remember the smaller the number the bigger the shot
I would not recommend a 410 for a novice
if you need to reach out to 100 to 200 yards i would recommend a centerfire 30 caliber and up.
a rimfire is good for small game and the Fox in the hen house. also for the occasional putting down live stock
a firearm is nothing to be feared, it is to be respected. it is a tool like a chainsaw, and or 🚜
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  #17  
Old 09-20-2017, 11:20 AM
blackpowderbill Male blackpowderbill is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Madison County, NE Georgia
Posts: 375
Default hunter ed course

Go take a hunter education course first!
A good homestead will have a 12 or 20 gauge. 22 long rifle and if ya want one a centerfire rifle in a common caliber like 243,270,30-30,30-06. If it were me depending on the area a 270 will take anything here in the lower 48.
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