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BHM's Homesteading & Self-Reliance Forum
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Go Back   BHM Forum > Homesteading > Food > Canning/Preserving

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Old 07-05-2008, 05:38 PM
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pcrowder Female pcrowder is offline
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Default I know you can pressure can lard, but what about b

My son thinks bacon is it's own "food group", and we always have tons of bacon grease around. I am trying desperately to keep from freezing anything that isn't vital, as our freezers are getting old and we are VERY rural, and prone to power outages in the winter. We have a generator, but at the cost of propane, I hate to use it to run a bunch of freezers. So, can you p/c bacon grease? If so, how long?
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Old 07-08-2008, 04:50 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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Default Re: I know you can pressure can lard, but what abo

I have to wonder why you would want to can it. Seems you can preserve it (ie: have it not go rancid) by just keeping it submerged in brine.
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Old 07-09-2008, 03:27 PM
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pcrowder Female pcrowder is offline
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Default Re: I know you can pressure can lard, but what abo

Catherine- what type of brine (what strength?)... I'd rather can it if at all possible for "in between" times when we're running low on bacon to use as flavoring. We have pigs due to go in, but not until October....
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Old 07-13-2008, 05:55 PM
CatherineID CatherineID is offline
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Default Re: I know you can pressure can lard, but what abo

Everything I've read says to clairfy the lard (it is the impurities in the lard which will make it go rancid quickly) and simply keep it cool. I figured if you wanted to keep bugs off of it (grease eating ants, for instance), you could cover it with briny water. From what I've read, you can't use too much salt. I'd add salt to hot water until it was a super concentrated solution. You'll know because no more salt will dissolve. Cool that water and pour it over the clarified lard or grease. The gease will try to rise so you'll have to weight it down.

If you need a recipe, I'd look for instructions for brining bacon or other fatty meat and use that.
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