Issue #71 of Backwoods Home Magazine. September/October, 2001

Issue #71

September/October, 2001

This issue is Sold Out.
Most articles are included in our print anthology
A Backwoods Home Anthology — The Twelfth Year
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Click on items listed in red to read them.

DEPARTMENTS

6  Publisher’s Note

7  Editorial: Freedom, guns, & boycotts

57  Ask Jackie: Dealing with wild bears and moose, canning cabbage, old butter churns, and more

22  Think of it this way:The coming American dictatorship, Part VI

18  Ayoob on Firearms:
      Sight and sound enhancement

62  Irreverent joke page

77  Book Review: Achieving Energy Independence—One Step at a Time

78  Small Business Profile

79  Letters

90   Advertiser Index

86  Classified ads (pdf)

86  Classified ad form

91   BHM books

94-95  Subscription Info

97  The last word:
      Man vs. the machine

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or call Toll Free 1-800–835-2418

Cover 71
ABOUT THE COVER
The cover for this issue is a painting by the artist Don Childers. It’s a buck under the autumn foliage as he’s about to cross a small stream. We thought we’d be able to think of something interesting to say about the picture, but after Dave and I sat around the office for awhile trying to think of something snazzy to say, we finally admitted we couldn’t come up with anything.
      Finally, Dave said, “Why don’t we just tell people we liked it?
      And that’s really the reason we chose it as this issue’s cover.”
      Live with it.

FEATURES

Independent energy

8  Water: a safe supply when you’re off the grid   By Jeffrey Yago

      Securing a safe supply of potable water can be one of the things that confounds a move to the country. This is all the more difficult when you live off the grid. Jeffrey Yago explains how he designed and installed a water system in the remote mountains of Idaho to efficiently and effectively provide safe water.

Self-sufficiency

14  Living the outlaw life: Beware the Great Guru of Freedom   By Claire Wolfe

      Freedom lovers, like the rest of overburdened humanity, often look for simple solutions to complex problems. Claire Wolfe tells us there are steps we can take, but warns against succumbing to the ubiquitous self-styled gurus who dispense bad advice, take our money, and can even land us in jail.

42  Tips and handy hints for 4X4 living   By Jackie Clay

      There are several things you should consider when selecting a 4X4 for backwoods living, and Jackie Clay guides us through the options.

Farm and garden

35  The good life starts with your garden   By Alice Yeager

      If you are looking to move to the backwoods for a life of self-sufficiency, the search should start with an eye as to what kind of ground you’re moving onto. Alice Yeager lets us in on a little secret on what to look for — garden strips.

Building and tools

27  Build your own log home in the woods: part 2   By Jackie Clay

      In this, the second installment of Jackie Clay’s three-part series on building your own log home, she tells us how to put in the footings and floor, how to make provisions for electricity and water, how to “lay up the logs” while making room for windows, doors, fireplaces, and chimneys, how to plan for a loft or a second floor, and how to begin your roof.

39  This coop is for the birds: Mattie Sue, Splatty-Goo, and Fu-man-choo   By Dorothy Ainsworth

      Chickens are low-maintenance pets, inexpensive to feed, and they give back that little prize every day. All they ask for in return is a light and airy shelter, kept clean and dry and safe, and Dorothy Ainsworth tells you how to build them one.

70  Earth-sheltered homes and structures   By Ruthanne and Marty Davis

      Imagine a home where heating and cooling bills are low and changes in the outdoor temperature do not alter indoor temperatures by more than a few degrees, even in the coldest environments. These are just a few of the advantages you have when you live in an earth-sheltered home.

Country Living

66  Storm Survivors   By Anita Evangelista

Recipes

46  Caribbean cooking   By Richard Blunt

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