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Where We Live by John Silveira and Richard Blunt. Photos and commentary from Oregon and New England.

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Archive for February 5th, 2013

 

What kind of hawk is this?

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

The other day, my friend, Christine Mack, and I were out driving in Ophir. Ophir lies just eight or ten miles north Gold Beach. We were traveling the frontage road that parallels Highway 101. I think it’s called Ophir Road.

“There’s a  hawk,” she said casually.

“Where?”

She pointed to the top of a power line pole I was driving by and I leaned forward over the steering wheel and just caught sight of it as we passed.

She naturally sees these things. I’m just learning to. I could say she sees them because she’s the passenger and I have to keep my eyes on the road, but she sees them when she’s driving, too, and I’m oblivious when I’m in the passenger’s seat.

I found a spot on the side of the road up ahead where I could turn around and we doubled back.

And there he (she?) was, sitting atop the pole. I could tell, right away, he didn’t appreciate our company and I was afraid when I got out of the car he would fly off. But he didn’t. He watched us askance while we watched him and I clicked away with my Canon 5D Mark III, whom I have named Chloe, while she was sporting my EF 400mm f/5.6 L USM lens.

All of these photos were cropped for the blog.

Here’s the catch: I don’t know what kind of hawk it is. Anyone out there know?

Here he was, regarding our interruption scornfully as he perched on the pole.

Here he was, regarding our interruption scornfully as he perched on the pole.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 160     focal length 400mm

 

I don’t know what he was looking at, here.

I don’t know what he was looking at, here.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 125     focal length 400mm

 

When he raised himself into this position, I thought he was getting ready to fly.

When he raised himself into this position, I thought he was getting ready to fly.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 160     focal length 400mm

 

He wasn’t. He was taking a poop. I don’t know if it was the call of nature or an expression of his opinion of us.

He wasn’t. He was taking a poop. I don’t know if it was the call of nature or an expression of his opinion of us.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 200     focal length 400mm

 

Bombs away!

Bombs away!

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 160     focal length 400mm

 

Finally, he did leave.

Finally, he did leave.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 200     focal length 400mm

 

G83C9296 cropped for blog

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 200     focal length 400mm

 

We caught up with him a quarter mile down the road. He was spotted, of course, by Christine.

We caught up with him a quarter mile down the road. He was spotted, of course, by Christine.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 100     focal length 400mm

 

But he still regarded us distrustfully. So, after a few more photos, we left him alone and drove on.

But he still regarded us distrustfully. So, after a few more photos, we left him alone and drove on.

Shutter speed 1/1000     f-stop 5.6     ISO 125     focal length 400mm

 
 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
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