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Where We Live by John Silveira and Richard Blunt. Photos and commentary from Oregon and New England.

Want to Comment on a blog post? Look for and click on the blue No Comments or # Comments at the end of each post.



The babies

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

I don’t have any great affection for Western Seagulls. I think it’s because there are so many of them and they’re here year-round, so I just don’t see them anymore.

However, a friend pointed out a Western Seagull nest at the launch ramp at the Port of Gold Beach. No matter how you feel about seagulls, babies are babies and almost universally cute. So, I’m now photographing them.

Here's the nest, atop some pilings, and I think that may be Mom and Dad watching over them.

Here’s the nest, atop some pilings, and I think that may be Mom and Dad watching over them.

There are three babies in the "divided" nest. This little one is stretching its wings.

There are three babies in the “divided” nest. The little guy on the left seems to spend a lot of time stretching its wings.

G83C5815 cropped for blog - Copy

 

I wondered why the one here was peering into the other side of the nest.

I wondered why the one here was peering into the other side of the nest.

He or she was about to pay its sibling a visit.

He or she was about to pay its other sibling a visit.

Maybe it was just triing to get away from the sibling that was crowding it with its wings. Whatever its intentions, if it falls, it's about 20 or 30 feet to the floating dock and the water below, and these guys can't fly, yet.

Maybe it was just trying to get away from the sibling that was crowding it with its wings. Whatever its intentions, if it falls, it’s about 15 feet to the floating dock and the water below, and these guys can’t fly, yet.

 

 

 

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