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Where We Live by John Silveira and Richard Blunt. Photos and commentary from Oregon and New England.

Want to Comment on a blog post? Look for and click on the blue No Comments or # Comments at the end of each post.



Then there was one…

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Three and a half weeks ago I posted some photos of baby western seagulls that were in a nest atop some pilings at the launch ramp in the Port of Gold Beach. I don’t know how many eggs were originally in the clutch, but when I started taking photos, there were three babies. Several days later, I returned and saw only two. I didn’t know if the third one was “hiding” because they can hunker down in the holes on the pilings and they’re invisible when they do. But I eventually realized one was really gone. A few days later, there was only one, and a few days after that I went down there and didn’t see any. Now, however, I’ve discovered there is still one and sometimes it does hide.

I don’t know what happened to the others. A few people suggested predators may have gotten them. But I’ve watched them jump from one part of the nest to another and, if they stumble and fall,  it’s a long way from the nest to the dock and the water and there’s no way of them getting back up.

This is a photo from almost a month ago. The babies seemed to like going from the "hole" atop one of the pilings to the hole atop the next one and jumping back.

This is a photo from almost a month ago. The babies seemed to like going from the “hole” atop one of the pilings to the hole atop the next one and jumping back.

This is the set of pilings where the nest is located. As you can see, a misstep or an errant breeze could be catastrophic to a baby that can't fly.

This is the set of pilings where the nest is located. As you can see, a misstep or an errant breeze when it’s jumping could be catastrophic to a baby that can’t fly.

This is when they were down to two.

This is when they were down to two.
Then there was one.

Then there was one.

This, of course is a different angle from the one I usually shoot them from.

This, of course is a different angle from the one I usually shoot them from.

I don't know if this one is as advanturous as the other two. It always seems to be atop the one piling.

I don’t know if this one has survived just because it isn’t as adventurous as the other two. It always seems to be atop the one piling.

This is the latest photo. The parents seem to hover around the nest. Maybe they realize this is going to be their only offspring this summer.

This is the latest photo. The parents seem to hover around the nest. Maybe they realize this is going to be their only offspring this summer.

 

 

 

 

One Response to “Then there was one…”

  1. Karen Baker Says:

    Thank you for posting this…I really enjoyed it! I feed the seagulls and the crows every morning…but have never seen a baby in the nest before. The pictures were delightful!

 
 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
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