Top Navigation  
 
U.S. Flag waving
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418
 
Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
 
Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues

Bookstore
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 Kindle Publications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Discount Books
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

More
 BHM Forum
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Lost Password
 Write For BHM


Link to BHM

Where We Live by John Silveira and Richard Blunt. Photos and commentary from Oregon and New England.

Want to Comment on a blog post? Look for and click on the blue No Comments or # Comments at the end of each post.



Great egrets catching fish

Monday, September 2nd, 2013

I took one hundred and fifty-five photos of two great egrets, over a five-minute period, in the Port of Gold Beach. It’s the first time I could clearly see them catching fish. Besides fish, great egrets eat amphibians, small mammals and reptiles, crustaceans, insects, etc.

I focused on one as it was stalking prey. It alternately walked very slowly or stood still in the shallow water. It now just waited for something below the surface to approach. When one of the fish finally got too close, the great egret plunged its head into the water and, when it pulled it out, it had one in its bill.

What I didn’t realize, until I saw this one in action, is that, once it’s caught a fish, it’ll very patiently dip it back into the water, several times, to clean it off. In this case, it was removing most of the seaweed before it ate it. This can take several minutes and several dips into the water. Then it’ll turn the fish in its bill so it can swallow it whole, head first. Unfortunately, I missed the shot where it swallowed the fish.

That silvery filament, in the next-to-last shot, that looks like fishing line, is thin strands of seaweed with water running down them.

In the fifth photo, you can see the great egret in the background trying to catch something. In the sixth photo, you can see just the seaweed hanging off a fish it had caught.

 

It's hunting.

It’s hunting.

I almost missed this shot because it struck so quickly.

I almost missed this shot because it struck so quickly.

It caught something.

It caught something.

G83C7616 cropped for blog

It's about to clean off its catch.

It’s about to clean off its catch.

It will dip its catch back into the water, several times, until it's satisfied the catch is clean.

It will dip its catch back into the water, several times, until it’s satisfied the catch is clean.

G83C7650 cropped for blog

While it's getting ready to swallow, its companion, in the background, is making its own catch.

While it’s getting ready to swallow, its companion, in the background, is making its own catch.

While it's turning it's catch to swallow it head-first, its companion has a mass of seaweed hanging from its own catch and will have to deal with it.

While it’s turning it’s catch to swallow it head-first, its companion has a mass of seaweed hanging from its own catch and will have to deal with it.

This is the full-frame photo of the cropped image above. I just thought you should see what I was seeing.

This is the full-frame photo of the cropped image above. I just thought you should see what I was seeing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments are closed.

 
 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Copyright © 1998 - Present by Backwoods Home Magazine. All Rights Reserved.