Comments

After Action Report: Contextual Handgun/The Armed Parent/Guardian — 16 Comments

  1. Your stepdaughter certainly did a fine job in writing this blog post. She held my attention throughout. My stepdaughter is/was a trauma nurse in a big-enough city and my sister an ER doctor in NYC, just btw.

    Seeing that child-sized black mannequin laying on the floor I was struck with, first a very decidely ‘un-pc’ thought referencing a liberal agit-prop group, and then, “what if the person who is creating the dangerous situation is actually holding a child?”

    As an ex-socialworker I have had the experience of individuals going off the deep end while holding a child in their arms, by the hand, or even using the child as a “prop” and shield.

  2. Great write up on a very informative class. No doubt we need more of these type classes available around the country. Thanks for you time writing this.
    Bob

  3. Mas – I wanted to share a safety reminder with your readers. I took a friend to the range last night to test fire his new 9 mm compact pistol and ended up in the emergency room. After shooting only two rounds, my friend attempted to activate the safety to ask me a question. I saw his left hand in front of the muzzle and before I could get the words out and get his finger off the trigger, he squeezed the trigger and sent a 9 mm FMJ through his left hand. Fortunately, I keep a tourniquet and trauma pack in my range bag. We got the bleeding under control quickly and got him proper medical attention. The staff at the range reacted very quickly and professionally, as did the EMTs that arrived within just a few minutes. He’s home now and doing well – albeit in a lot of pain and embarrassment. In his case, I’m not sure which is worse.

    Two lessons here – follow the four rules every time and always be prepared to react in an emergency.

    • One can say from experience that Murphy’s Law is too likely to obtain, and that some kind of inadvertent discharge of a cartridge about once every year or two is going to occur at a particular shooting range. Obviously, not all such shots head downrange unimpeded, if at all. The short handgun may be most prone to cause a hand injury, actually largely because of its ease of handling. Maybe a very simple, fifth rule should be put first: Don’t shoot somebody accidentally, especially yourself! A sense of vulnerability to mistakes is an important component of a safe state of mind.

      • Especially at the end of the day when you’re tired.

        I was working with a teacher, and laid my rifle on a table, pointing in a safe direction to handle another weapon. I didn’t unload the gun because I planned on picking it up in about a minute. Well, time with the other gun lengthened to 15 minutes, and then conversation started. When I went back to grab my own gun, it was time to leave the range.

        I was tired, and was just going to slip the rifle into the case, when I forced myself to check the chamber. I remembered the rule “When you touch a gun, always check.”

        The gun had a round in the chamber. I remembered that I never unloaded the gun.

        First, I should have cleared the gun when I put it down. Second, I should have never even considered casing the gun without checking it first. It’s amazing how easy it is to mess up when you’re tired after training all day.

  4. Excellent article. For reasons that are about to appear clear, this time I am going to have to use my anonymous log in. Mas, if your stepdaughter Sonja doesn’t already know about the Thunderwear Holsters, please recommend them to her. I also work in scrubs and the Thunderwear holster works PERFECTLY with them (Size S with a Kahr PM9 and a spare magazine). Comfortable and completely undetectable.

  5. I have two female investigators that will start their 8 hour CCW training class next week. I had them read this article. We found it informative.

    Thank you for posting.

    J. Edgar Investigation Agency

  6. I hope no liberals will see that photo showing a white person standing over a prone, child sized black dummy and thinking that gun owners are now encouraged to shoot little kids of color instead of limiting themselves to only blasting black teenagers for sport 🙁

  7. Mas,
    I discovered Melody long ago, when I was first becoming interested in handguns. It was through her videos that I learned how to do a field strip of my 1911. And of course, even though a lot of her blog posts were related more to women carrying and such, I was able to glean much from her, simply because she was not trying to make things more complicated than they are.
    I also want to second your stand in, Sonja, for a very good, and informative article. I suggest that you let her write about things that affect her and her day to day practices of both self defense, and self awareness. She hits the mark solidly as to being both detailed and still understandable.
    I also have looked at some of the classes available, and while they all look like they might be fun, the truth is, I doubt that I will ever be asked to clear a 3 story building, or any of the other scenarios that some teach. I possibly will be forced to draw my firearm, while at the same time trying to contend with a loved one, either young or my age, like my wife. Thanks for posting this, and thank your step daughter for both being a good writer, but also a good student, who was able to teach what she learned to others.

  8. Outstanding!
    It’s wonderful that Melody and John are covering such an IMPORTANT skill.
    Sonya, that was a thorough review, nice jobJ

  9. John Correia has a video on his ASP youtube channel (from Brazil) that shows an off-duty officer with his toddler in one arm as he shoots at multiple BG’s in a store. Toward the end his wife runs up and grabs the kid, and he proceeds to further clearing of the aisles. That video is heart-stopping to watch.

    (the situational background is that BG’s normally kill any off-duty officers they encounter during robberies, and they are required to be armed at all times. Having a perp discover your gun or badge during a pat-down is a death sentence)