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IN THE EYE OF THE (GENTLE) STORM — No Comments

  1. -Those who fail to prepare, prepare to fail.

    I try to keep all the essentials on hand, with enough to last me awhile. Food, water, batteries, ammo, warm clothing etc. Another thing I’ve learn to do is keep spares of stuff. Holsters, carry guns, knives, flashlights etc. Got a duplicate carry gun and holster should either need to be taken out of service. (And let’s face it most of us that carry have all the “other” holsters we bought and used once or never used period…)

    Had to wiki Geocaching. I’ve heard of it before but didn’t know exactly what it was. Sounds like a fun outdoor hobby. Not sure if I would have gone at night when it was raining…but then again I’ve gone out for pancakes during a blizzard…

  2. Mas,

    I notice that your shoulder holster appears to have a belt tie-in. Can you comment on whether or not the belt tie-in restricts your range of motion and/or affects comfort and weapon control? If you (or anyone else) has already discussed this, a link would be fine.

    I run an Alessi horizontal carry rig, which does not need the belt tie-in, but I was trying to advise a fellow who was looking at vertical carry and I would like to get him “the voice of experience” that I do not have in this instance.

    Thank you for your time,

    Matthew

  3. Mas:

    Is that your pet alligator behind you in the third photo? It looks kind of scrawny, maybe you should feed it more anti-gun liberals.

    Tom

  4. People around here in WA crack up at me when they ask why I am prepared year around. I patiently explain that I lived in Florida for many years so when hurricane season came around I didn’t need to rush to the store for supplies as I was already and always prepared. Just makes sense to me. Hope you Guys had a great weekend.

  5. I live near the mouth of the Cape Fear River in NC. It’s that little hook that sticks out in an effort to snag every storm that wends its way up the Atlantic coast. This week, Beryl only forced me to cancel my golf game (which gave me an opportunity to hit the range in the afternoon). Around here, an “event” like Beryl doesn’t even register on the OMG scale. In this area, we tend to be well prepared in advance to either lash ourselves to the mast or head for the high ground. I’m glad you were also minimally affected by the storm and got some shooting time in.

  6. The only time my 357 isn’t with me is when I’m in the shower or in the bed. I even carry it when I have my M&P 40.Still trying to pile my ammo deep.

  7. “…old fat guy?” Hardly! I”m wearing a lot more disaster relief: rations for a month would be my conservative estimate!
    Interesting point on stainless hardware though. Many that were displaced in the aftermath of Katrina didnt have the means to care for their blued pieces. Got to admit, stainless can sure take a beating in a natural disaster

  8. You will Never Be Wrong “When you have a S&W 357. mag. on your body. / I wish more people would prepare for what the World may bring to there door step. When you talk to most people about being prepared, most will say they plan on it, but then Blows it off. I guess some people have to get burned, before they know what HOT is..Wishing all a great day!

  9. As the saying goes, stuff happens. The difference is that the unprepared are always in a state of perpetual crisis as the typical host of events rolls in while for the prepared it’s just another day at the railroad.

  10. That thing in the background is Mas’ CCW.

    Concealed Crocodile Weapon

    While very effective at engaging a threat, reholstering is usually problematic.

  11. Spent some time down in the Orlando area, for boot camp and “A”/Nuke schools, way back in the day. Used to love it when it would rain like that, nothing like a good 6-mile run while its pouring! No overheating, you don’t really get thirsty, and the sidewalks are clear. Never tried Geocaching in the rain, though…one fluffy cloud on the horizon, and my old GPS gets cranky. Man, I miss running (bad knees) and Geocaching (lazy)!

  12. I think that thirsty alligator is trying to sneak a swig out of Mas’ jug of moonshine laying on the ground behind him in the third photo.

  13. Mas – I really do enjoy your posts and writing style!

    I have enjoyed your great reading material & content for many years now.

    Thanks!

  14. A David Lauck 1911 traded off for a Smith wheelgun… someone must have been bored during the downpour and going through their accessories.

    So, the question remains, for us fashionistoes, exactly WHICH Smith .357 did you decide to go with?

    While that’s going on, I’m taking an inventory of batteries here in AZ for the next hurricane. 😉

  15. Really Mas, a shoulder rig? Have you been watching re-runs of the Untouchables ? If I ever used a shoulder rig, it would be one like that. I dont like the horizontal ones that point a loaded weapon at the guy behind you. Does Bianchi still offer these ?

  16. Mas Fan, shoulder holsters are very comfortable. I had a minor back operation, and if I wear a gun outside my clothing on a belt, it must be balanced with something on the other side. Otherwise, my back bothers me. The best thing to balance it with is another gun, of course, but I have also used binoculars, canteens or about six full speedloaders. However, if I wear one gun in a belly band close to my skin, my back is fine.

    I have an Uncle Mike’s Sidekick, size 3, to carry my Ruger GP-100 with a 6″ barrel, outside my clothes, of course. For concealed carry, I have something named “Kangaroo” which goes around my chest, points the snubnose S&W Model 60 straight down under my arm. I also have Kramer Confidant (pronounced “Con-fi-donnt”) T-shirts which can carry a pistol under each arm very comfortably. With two pistols, I can do a NY reload, and don’t need to carry speedloaders. Hey, whatever works. Weather has a lot to do with my choices, too.

  17. Matthew McLaughlin, I do like the belt tie down, makes the draw cleaner on a vertical shoulder holster and also keeps it from banging against your rib cage when you run, as happens with unsecured shoulder holsters. They only time you feel it as a “range of movement” issue — or at least, the only time I feel it so — is when stretching to reach something high above my head.

    David H., that one is a Bianchi X2100; not sure if it’s still in their catalog or not, but I found that one in a used holster bin at a gun shop and it’s worked out great.