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Q and A: Leaving Montana and garlic and onions — 3 Comments

  1. when I moved into this house, the back side of my land was covered in garlic. after the neighbor harvested his garlic, the small ones he just threw out on the ground, and the next spring, up it came. I had no clue garlic was so difficult to grow. we get down to 20 below a couple times per winter but, most of the time, we stay pretty close to the 30 to 40 mark. I’m delighted we don’t have the pure cold all you northerners consider normal. we also get more ice than snow, just not often. my neighbor passed away, and the garlic slowly disappeared since then.
    gen

  2. Jim G, I’d suspect that you didn’t mulch your garlic and as Jackie said, it was planted late. But even planted late, it would likely have survived if it had been mulched. Mulch is key to fall planting of garlic, onions and shallots. I’d never get a crop without it because where I live there’s a lot of freeze/thaw, very cold winter temps, and unmulched cloves and bulbs tend to freeze and to heave out of the ground. I use hay, straw works if you don’t have wind. I put down a good 4 inches and have to weight it down so it doesn’t blow off. I think if you will mulch on your next try you’ll have success. The other thing I do is apply fish emulsion fertilizer in spring, once a week for about 2 months (how long depends on when your sprouts come up), one tablespoon to a gallon of water. My soil is good and amended each year, but the fish emulsion just seems to add a boost of early strong growth and disease prevention.

  3. Jim G, I’d suspect that you didn’t mulch your garlic and as Jackie said, it was planted too late. But even planted late, it would likely have survived if it had been mulched. Mulch is key to fall planting of garlic, onions and shallots. I’d never get a crop without it because where I live there’s a lot of freeze/thaw and unmulched cloves and bulbs tend to heave out of the ground. I use hay, straw works if you don’t have wind. I put down a good