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The Ballad of Carl Drega

Book review

By Oliver Del Signore

Oliver Del Signore

Issue #78 • November/December, 2002

Those who say sequels are never as good as the original, have not read The Ballad of Carl Drega, the follow-up to Send in the Waco Killers. Following in the style of Waco Killers, Vin's new book is built around his newspaper columns but it surpasses the first effort with much more added commentary and expansion of the material.

Book Cover

Although it entertains as it informs, this book is not for the faint of head. Unlike other authors, Vin's no-holds-barred style of writing neither pulls any punches nor talks down to the reader. He writes for those who know how to read and how to think. He is a meticulous and tireless researcher and lays out the facts—often very disturbing facts—for all to see.

Subtitled Essays on the Freedom Movement, 1994 to 2001, the meat of The Ballad of Carl Drega is divided into sixteen chapters. It begins with the account of how New Hampshire citizen Carl Drega endured years of bureaucratic harassment and judicial indifference while trying to work within the system, but finally had enough and used lethal force to fight back.

From that springboard, Suprynowicz dives into topics like The Tyranny of Taxation, Are The Gun-Rights Lobbyists Being De-Clawed, Environmentalism as a State Religion, Sacrificing Children to the Government Vaccination Machine, Burn the Schools, Castrating a People Who Said 'Can Do,' and much more.

The Ballad of Carl Drega is a great book for a cold winter's day because what you read will set your blood to boiling. It is a volume every soccer mom, environmentalist, feel-good, knee-jerk do-gooder and politician should study because it will open their eyes to the reality of what fifty-plus years of socialist intervention and government expansion have done to this once proud land and the values for which it once stood.

You will read about Dr. Steven M. Beresford's landmark lawsuit against the IRS and about how environmentalists use the power of government to force farmers and ranchers off their land.

You'll learn how Sandra Dykes' children were taken away from her after she resisted the advances of a male social worker.

You'll come to know many unfortunate people as you read this book, people who have been marginalized, oppressed, lied-to, cheated, illegally punished, ignored, threatened, and even killed by their own government.

And if you believe the Second Amendment means what it plainly says, and that the NRA exists to prevent your gun rights from being abridged, you'll want to lock your firearms away in case you lose your temper when you read the truth about how the NRA is, and always has been, a gun-control organization.

Justice Louis Brandeis said, "The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding."

After reading The Ballad of Carl Drega, you will understand in great detail exactly what Justice Brandeis meant.

The Ballad of Carl Drega
By Vin Suprynowicz
Mountain Media
689 pages, Trade Paperback, 2002

Oliver Del Signore is a freelance writer, proofreader, creative consultant, website designer, and the webmaster for Backwoods Home Magazine. He welcomes comments and inquiries via email to




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      Please address comments regarding this page to editor[at]backwoodshome.com. Comments may appear in the "Letters" section of Backwoods Home Magazine. Although every email is read, busy schedules generally do not permit personal responses.


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
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