Top Navigation  
 
U.S. Flag waving
Office Hours Momday - Friday  8 am - 5 pm Pacific 1-800-835-2418
 
Facebook   YouTube   Twitter
 

Features
 Home Page
 Current Issue
 Article Index
 Author Index
 Previous Issues
 Print Display Ads
 Print Classifieds
 Newsletter
 Letters
 Humor
 Free Stuff
 Recipes
 Home Energy

General Store
 Ordering Info
 Subscriptions
 Kindle Subscriptions
 Kindle Publications
 Anthologies
 Books
 Back Issues
 Help Yourself
 All Specials
 Classified Ad

Advertise
 Web Site Ads
 Magazine Ads

BHM Blogs
 Ask Jackie Clay
 Massad Ayoob
 Claire Wolfe
 Where We Live
 Dave on Twitter
Retired Blogs
 Behind The Scenes
 Oliver Del Signore
 David Lee
 James Kash
 Energy Questions

Quick Links
 Home Energy Info
 Jackie Clay
 Ask Jackie Online
 Dave Duffy
 Massad Ayoob
 John Silveira
 Claire Wolfe

Forum / Chat
 Forum/Chat Info
 Enter Forum
 Lost Password

More Features
 Contact Us/
 Change of Address
 Write For BHM
 Meet The Staff
 Meet The Authors
 Disclaimer and
 Privacy Policy


Retired Features
 Country Moments
 Links
 Feedback
 Radio Show


Link to BHM

Living Freedom by Claire Wolfe. Musings about personal freedom and finding it within ourselves.

Want to Comment on a blog post? Look for and click on the blue No Comments or # Comments at the end of each post.



Archive for the ‘Books and Movies’ Category

Claire Wolfe

Critter videos

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Source. (H/T K&R)

If I ever end up on one of these places, I want a roaming Great Dane. But for a poodle, Nala’s pretty amazing.

Source. (H/T Cat. Yes, Cat sent an adorable dog video.)

Claire Wolfe

Tuesday links

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016
  • Pretty amazing way for a 16-year-old to live. (H/T JB)
  • OTOH, some people may just have too much time on their hands. And hatchets and beer in them. (H/T ML)
  • Speaking of too much time and hands … did you know there’s a (not joking) world of rock-paper-scissors competition? (Tip o’ hat to jed)
  • Looking for some good hard science fiction? (H/T MJR)
  • Get businesses freaked out enough about “discriminating against the disabled” and they’ll fall for anything.
  • 12 lessons to learn and hang onto forever. (Especially for business, but plenty have applications in the rest of the world, too.)
  • Just to cheer you up, here’s the latest report on global-catastrophic risks. I confess not to have read it yet. I don’t need that kind of “cheering up” right now. But just in case you’re interested. (H/T MJR)
  • Assume your state government is in big trouble if one, single taxpayer saying goodbye could have this much impact.
  • It seems more lefties are realizing their fellows have become high-handed elitist snobs, and that it happened when the left parted ways with the working class.
Claire Wolfe

Wednesday links

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Happened to be at the library and happened to have collected a bunch of interestingly open tabs. So here you go …

  • Five tips for making your social justice pecksniff hoax a success. :-)
  • Barefoot Bandit boy, I’ve always felt kind of fond of you. As criminals go, you’ve got style and brains. You reimbursed your victims and you gave $100 to my favorite vet to help animals. But this is just dumbass stupid. Your mother smoked and drank herself to death on government money. Who, other than you, would want to bring her back to life? (H/T CB)
  • What to do if you have nothing to hide. The great up-and-coming freedomista Kit Perez (formerly Lange) nails it. (Via Matt at Sipsey Street)
  • Also from Matt. This one’s a hoot: “Tacticool Tuesday: How I learned to stop worrying and love my inner Geardo.”
  • In Russia, everything old is new again, says Nicki who’s in a position to know.
  • And it’s the same-old-same-old in the world of U.S. cops, too. So it’s okay to train a dog to potentially “rip the face off” any innocent person — infant, sleeping woman, hapless bystander — as long as it’s for “officer safety”?
  • Getting away from all that evil … Years ago, webmaster Oliver sent me a the catalog of the Museum of Bad Art. Smiling my way through it the other day, I wondered if the place still existed. Yes! And it’s growing. Here’s a portion of its fabulous collection, each piece worth as much as $6.50. And for those who simply must have these works prominently displayed on their coffee tables, the original catalog has now been supplemented by a collection of their masterworks.
Claire Wolfe

Solve the medical mess: share this book

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

The High Price of Socialized Medicine:
A History of Government Meddling in American Health Care,
And How a Free Market Would Solve Our Problems

By Dr. James W. Brook
302 pages

I owe Dr. Jim an apology. It must be two months now since he sent me a copy of his book for review. I meant to get on it right away. But you know, I just could not bring myself to pick up and read that book.

It’s not that there was anything wrong with it. On the contrary, at a glance it was obviously a solid, professional piece of work. I already knew Dr. Jim, an occasional Commentariat participant, writes clearly with an amazingly light touch given the subject matter. The book is lucid, well laid-out, and easy on the eye.

I just could not force myself to endure a rehash of the hash that politicians are making of what was once (and in some ways still is) the best medical system on the planet.

Once I belatedly opened the cover, I realized I had nothing to dread.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Claire Wolfe

Just a little catching up

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Another Darwin runner up

If this is actually true (and Snopes hasn’t pronounced otherwise), it truly belongs in the Department of Stupidity Archives: Motorist tries to drive through a Roadrunner tunnel. (H/T MJR)

—–

Constitutional carry moves ahead

« Read the rest of this entry »

Claire Wolfe

A Day Out of Time

Monday, March 21st, 2016

This weekend I read Oliver Sacks’ tiny mini-tome, Gratitude. I really mean tiny. It’s a book you can finish in half an hour.

It consists of four short essays, all written in the two years before his death. All four reflect on aging and dying as Sacks went from a robust 79-year-old who swam a mile a day to an invalid dying of liver cancer. He really says nothing new or profound. For that matter he doesn’t say much overtly about gratitude. The attraction is, of course, that Oliver Sacks is saying the rather familiar things about death.

He lived in front of the world for all those decades, a man of the mind who also studied minds and wrote about them in the liveliest way. So you know that when he quotes a philosopher, said philosopher was likely to have been a good friend. And you know that when his cousin turns him on to a good idea, it’s going to be his cousin the Nobel Prize winner.

In this case his cousin the Nobel Prize winning economist, Robert John Aumann, is also an observant Orthodox Jew, who inspired the last essay in the book, “Sabbath.”

I’ve always admired such strict observances as not even being willing to drive a car or flip a light switch or turn on a stove burner from some arcane-but-precise moment on Friday to some arcane-but-precise moment on Saturday. At the same time, it also seems silly. Srsly you can’t turn on a 21st-century LED light on the Sabbath because of a millennia-old proscription against lighting fires on that day? Well, yeah, it makes a certain bureaucratic sense. But …

Yet I sometimes find myself yearning for such ritual, such steadfast belief in something unknowable. I’m not patient enough to practice rituals that don’t make sense to me (whether the rituals of a mainstream religion or some neopagan thing like honoring the four corners), but it seems like such an honorable and mindful ideal.

Sacks wrote of the Sabbath differently. Watching his cousin and his family observe the Sabbath, he didn’t think of their observances as being hopelessly strict or meaningless, even though he’d long since ceased being a believer. He thought of their ultra-observent Sabbath as “a day out of time.” A day to step aside from the go-go world.

What a great way to view it.

That could mean a lot of different things to different people, but most of them, I’m guessing, are filled with adventures in serenity.

Claire Wolfe

Great movie! Lousy weather. Life in general

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

Great movie! The Martian

Boy, have you guys seen The Martian? Holy cats!

I watched it on DVD a few days ago and was glad I didn’t see it on a big screen or, heaven forbid, in 3D. I’d have had a heart attack and not be here to write this at you.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Claire Wolfe

Friday links

Friday, March 11th, 2016

Yes, even when ‘Netless, I manage to pick up some newses. Enjoy.

Claire Wolfe

RebelFire nightmare

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

During my nice, mundane days, I’ve begun a mega-tidying. Not a Marie Kondo-type tidying, mind you. I wouldn’t tuck my purses inside my purses, even if I owned purses, which for many years I have not (see the “head in the clouds” subhead at that link if you wonder what the heck I’m talking about).

I am, among other things, tidying my computer files and finding the best places to tuck various guns, knives, and power tools. Serious tidying, that.

Along the way, I found the backup files of both the job culture book (which I knew I had somewhere) and RebelFire (which I didn’t know I had). I foresee Kindle-izing in my future.

In the directory with the not-quite-final RF book files I found yet another forgotten piece of the history of Jeremy, Cedra, and the band RebelFire. A movie script.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Claire Wolfe

Finally, a job Ava could do!

Friday, February 26th, 2016

(Source — and H/T S.)

Claire Wolfe

End O’ week links

Thursday, February 11th, 2016
  • Millennials don’t yet realize how fully the political system is rigged. (H/T Shel and jed in comments)
  • Pop-Up House.. Low cost, quick build, pretty cool. But why when they tout these things do they always act as if plumbing, electrical work, and site prep don’t exist?
  • “Are Pets Really Good for Us?” Heck, yeah! … as long as we don’t trip over them or become social outcasts.
  • Well, this is depressing. Fear of punishment from a vengeful god turns out to produce social good. Not surprising, really. That’s probably why vengeful gods were invented (by those who wanted to define social good for everybody else).
  • Nicki on government health care as the ultimate sickness. Man, such horror stories should have been left behind in the Soviet Union.
  • Smart guns, stupid science (and that’s even without addressing their “features” of being hackable and remote shut-offable).
  • Just five years old and already the the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is a hotbed of abuse, including race-based corporate shakedowns.
  • Finally, OK Go does another one of their mind-bendingly memorable videos for another of their oddly forgettable songs.
Claire Wolfe

Wednesday links

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016
 
 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Copyright © 1998 - Present by Backwoods Home Magazine. All Rights Reserved.