Family dinner at Backwoods Home Magazine

By Richard Blunt Issue #129 • May/June, 2011 Last fall I was invited to Gold Beach, Oregon, to spend some quality time with my lifelong friend, Dave Duffy, and his family. On these visits it is...

Making apple pectin

By Kristina Seleshanko Issue #167 • September/October, 2017 One day, as I walked past an apple tree that was naturally thinning its fruit by dropping tiny, baby apples, I thought, “I wish there was something useful...

Canning game meat

By Linda Gabris Issue #166 • July/August, 2017 Attempting to can meat (or any other low acid food, for that matter) without the use of a pressure canner is every bit as foolhardy as arming up...

Cast iron loaf pans from breakfast to dessert

By Matt and Linda Morehouse Issue #133 • January/February, 2012 Cast iron loaf pans are not just for bread. Nearly as versatile as the cast iron 10-inch (#8) covered skillet, the venerable cast iron loaf pan...

Making delicious, unthinkable wines

By Lev G. Fedyniak Issue #110 • March/April, 2010 I love wines. Always have. I've drunk wine, studied wine, written about wine, and collected wine. But I got tired of hearing my back-to-nature friends chide me by...

Elderberries — Hospitality, Health, And Beauty

By Gail Butler Issue #124 • July/August, 2010 When friends stop by for a visit I like to offer them a hospitable and healthful libation of elderberry cordial. When served in a small aperitif glass or...

Dehydrating food

By Kristina Seleshanko Issue #173 • September/October, 2018 Dehydration is one of the oldest and easiest methods of food preservation. Anyone can easily dry and store almost any food; there are just a few basic rules...

Switch your family to goat’s milk

By Tanya Kelley Issue #128 • March/April, 2011 If you milk goats, there's no doubt you've heard it—"Eww! Goat's milk! Gross!" To be perfectly honest, goat milk does taste different than cow milk. So? Different doesn't...

Brining pickles by the quart or gallon

By Vicky Rose Issue #113 • September/October, 2008 The ancient art of brining pickles produces a product similar to the expensive "deli-style" pickles in the supermarket. The process is not difficult; however, older recipes call for...

Picking and preserving the wild plum

By Bill Weekes Issue #69 • May/June, 2001 The wild plum is a fickle fruit, ripening any time between late spring and late summer. It comes in a bunch of colors, shapes, and sizes. Some are...

Brew your own root beer

By Tim Murphy Issue #130 • July/August, 2011 Ah, root beer! That sweet, dark elixir of kidhood, majestically topped with a beige pillow of foam. It's the perfect companion to Bazooka bubble gum, baseball cards, wiffle...

Pasteurizing milk

By Patrice Lewis Issue #123 • May/June, 2010 In the last hundred years of urban migration, the home or small farm dairy became a lost breed. Who needed to keep a cow when it was so...

Some unusual jellies for your sweet tooth

By Charles Sanders Issue #70 • July/August, 2001 In my mind, one of the simple pleasures in life is hot biscuits, a dab of butter, and a dollop of homemade jelly. Around here any biscuits left...

Bob’s basic breads for beginners, bachelors, barbarians, and backwoodsmen

By Bob Van Putten Issue #173 • September/October, 2018 I reckon it takes a lot of gall for me to write about bread because compared to my wife I’ll never be anything but a rank amateur...

Growing and Using Cilantro

By Habeeb Salloum Cilantro (also called fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, Mexican parsley, Spanish parsley, and Thai parsley) is one of the oldest herbal condiments known to humankind. It is thought to be the first herb...

Woodstove cooking

By Cindi Myers Issue #127 • January/February, 2011 If you have a woodstove for heat, take advantage of the fire to cook your dinner for no extra cost and very little effort. The heat of a...